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so I'm trying to pass a type double * to a function that accepts void ** as one of the parameters. This is the warning that I am getting.

incompatible pointer type passing 'double **' to parameter of type 'void **'

Here is a snippet of my code.

int main( void )
{
    //  Local Declaration
    double *target;

   //   Statement
   success = dequeue(queueIn, &target);
}

Here's the prototype declaration of the function.

int    dequeue     ( QUEUE *queue, void **dataOutPtr );

I thought that if I passed target as a two level pointer that it would work, but I guess I'm wrong. Can someone please explain to me how come i'm getting this warning?

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@GreenMatt The type signature for dequeue expecta pointer to a pointer. Look again. –  ValekHalfHeart Apr 23 '13 at 4:14
    
possible duplicate of Is void** an acceptable type in ANSI-C? –  Cody Gray Apr 23 '13 at 4:17
    
ideone.com/VGvqFe –  Binayaka Chakraborty Apr 23 '13 at 4:17
    
This is very likely a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/246280/… –  Rüppell's Vulture Apr 23 '13 at 4:28
2  
So, you've solved the casting issue. The bigger issue is likely what form of data the dequeue function is expecting. I bet it's not a pointer to an uninitialised pointer to double. –  MatthewD Apr 23 '13 at 4:30

3 Answers 3

In your prototype declaration , you said second argument as void** ,so you have to type cast doublee** to void**. Instead of this line success = dequeue(queueIn, &target);.

Call like this success = dequeue(queueIn,(void**) &target);

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2  
Why is the cast necessary? Aren't all pointers interpret-able as void pointers? –  ValekHalfHeart Apr 23 '13 at 4:15
1  
@valek That's true for void*, but not for the double-pointer void**. Details are here. –  Cody Gray Apr 23 '13 at 4:17
    
okay, yeah, type casting did take the warning off, but now my data for target isn't being recognize. One problem solve, but another one raises haha. –  Nathan Apr 23 '13 at 4:19
    
@Nathan It's obvious that it now doesn't recognize the data as you have stripped off its identity by casting it to void**. –  Rüppell's Vulture Apr 23 '13 at 4:22
    
This can be a bit dangerous sometimes. We once had 2 userdefined free-methods. One would take void* as argument and just free the memory, the other would take void** as argument and free as well as reset the pointer. If you call it without a cast it always uses the void*-variant, even if you passed the reference of a pointer which effectively resulted in freeing UB. I would avoid void** altogether. –  Excelcius Apr 23 '13 at 4:28
int main( void )
{
    //  Local Declaration
    double *target;

   //   Statement
   success = dequeue(queueIn, (void**)&target);
}

Use it like this.

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What does this change? Why does he need to make this change? –  Cody Gray Apr 23 '13 at 4:22
1  
Assuming the queue is a list of "pointers to doubles", this is likely correct. Hard to say without knowing more about the library of code. –  selbie Apr 23 '13 at 4:31

Even though all other pointer types can be converted to and from void * without loss of information, the same is not true of void ** and other pointer-to-pointer types; if you dereference a void ** pointer, it needs to be pointing at a genuine void * object1.

In this case, presuming that dequeue() is returning a single pointer value by storing it through the provided pointer, to be formally correct you would need to do:

int main( void )
{
    void *p;
    double *target;

    success = dequeue(queueIn, &p);
    target = p;

When you write it like this, the conversion from void * to double * is explicit, which allows the compiler to do any magic that's necessary (even though in the overwhelmingly common case, there's no magic at all).


1. ...or a char *, unsigned char * or signed char * object, because there's a special rule for those.

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