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I have a list of strings which I want to remove from a super set of another strings, not in a any specific order and thus constructing a new set. Is that doable in Bash?

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1  
Are these strings in files? One per line? If not, where are they how are they stored? –  Vinko Vrsalovic Oct 23 '09 at 21:51
    
Just a simple bash variable containing a list of text strings such as: SET1 = "package-x86 test0 hello world" SET2 = "computer hello sizeof compiler world package-x86 rocks test0" I want to get: SET3 = "computer sizeof compiler rocks" –  Ilyes Gouta Oct 23 '09 at 21:59
    
So what, you just want a random word generator? –  Adam Bard Oct 23 '09 at 22:02
    
random word generator? I can do a O(N²) bash function that does it (two loops, one nested) that goes through every string in SET2 an check if it equal any string (one by one) in SET1, if it's not the case then append in the initially empty SET3, but that doesn't scale for huge lists. I'm looking if there is already a built-in feature in bash that can help out. –  Ilyes Gouta Oct 23 '09 at 22:08
    
You should have said so in the original q, I just wrote an O(N*M) solution for you... :/ –  Vinko Vrsalovic Oct 23 '09 at 22:22

7 Answers 7

It looks like you're looking for something with better than O(nm) running time, so here's an answer to that. Fgrep or grep -F uses the Aho-Corasick algorithm to make a single FSM out of a list of fixed strings, so checking each word in SET2 takes O(length of word) time. This means the whole running time of this script is O(n+m).

(obviously the running times are also dependent on the length of the words)

[meatmanek@yggdrasil ~]$ cat subtract.sh 
#!/bin/bash
subtract()
{
  SET1=( $1 )
  SET2=( $2 )
  OLDIFS="$IFS"
  IFS=$'\n'
  SET3=( $(grep -Fxv "${SET1[*]}" <<< "${SET2[*]}") )
  IFS="$OLDIFS"
  echo "${SET3[*]}"
  # SET3 = SET2-SET1
}
subtract "$@"
[meatmanek@yggdrasil ~]$ . subtract.sh 

[meatmanek@yggdrasil ~]$ subtract "package-x86 test0 hello world" "computer hello sizeof compiler world package-x86 rocks"
computer sizeof compiler rocks
[meatmanek@yggdrasil ~]$
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You guys are so unbelievable! Amazing! Thanks! I think I'll go for the hash and the (hopefully) intelligent grep versions. I like the elegance of the regex + case/esac one. –  Ilyes Gouta Oct 24 '09 at 9:08
1  
Nice. Although it uses newline as separators, you can also use just: subtract() { fgrep -vx "${1// /$'\n'}" <<< "${2// /$'\n'}" ; } -- or for space separators, use: subtract() { echo $( fgrep -vx "${1// /$'\n'}" <<< "${2// /$'\n'}" ) ; } –  NVRAM Dec 5 '09 at 20:38
    
Good call; that is much simpler. –  Evan Krall Dec 29 '09 at 2:34

I think you'll have to at least characterize the parameters of the subset of strings you want to extract. If it's textfield-like data, though, look into awk.

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No special characterization, no regex. I'm looking for something like in makefiles, $(filter-out s1, s2) –  Ilyes Gouta Oct 23 '09 at 22:01

How about any ugly abuse of the builtin command hash?

#!/bin/bash
set -eu

filter_out() {
    local words="$2" words_to_remove="$1"
    ( # do this in a subshell to avoid contaminating the main script
        set +e
        hash -r
        hash -p bogus-placeholder $words
        hash -d $words_to_remove > /dev/null 2>&1
        left=''
        for word in $words; do
            hash -t "$word" > /dev/null 2>&1 && left="${left}${left:+ }$word"
        done
        printf '%s\n' "$left"
    )
}

filter_out "package-x86 test0 hello world" "computer hello sizeof compiler world package-x86 rocks test0"
w='foo bar baz quux toto'
d='baz toto quux'
filter_out "$d" "$w"
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This uses grep to see if a word has to be removed, but that's not pure BASH and it's probably faster than the other option (see below)

#!/bin/bash
REMOVE="package-x86 test0 hello world"
WORDBAG="computer hello sizeof compiler world package-x86 rocks test0"
OFS=$IFS
IFS=" "
WORDBAG_ARRAY=($WORDBAG)
IFS=$OFS
RESULT=""

for str2 in ${WORDBAG_ARRAY[@]}
do
        echo $REMOVE | grep $str2 >/dev/null
        if [[ $? == 1 ]] #Not Found
        then
                RESULT="$RESULT $str2"
        fi
done

echo $RESULT

This is a bit verbose, uses BASH arrays, and is O(N*M), but works.

#!/bin/bash
REMOVE="package-x86 test0 hello world"
WORDBAG="computer hello sizeof compiler world package-x86 rocks test0"
OFS=$IFS
IFS=" "
REMOVE_ARRAY=($REMOVE)
WORDBAG_ARRAY=($WORDBAG)
IFS=$OFS
RESULT=""

for str2 in ${WORDBAG_ARRAY[@]}
do
        found=0
        for str1 in ${REMOVE_ARRAY[@]}
        do
                if [[ "$str1" == "$str2" ]]
                then
                        found=1
                fi
        done
        if [[ $found == 0 ]]
        then
                RESULT="$RESULT $str2"
        fi
done

echo $RESULT
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#!/bin/bash
SET1="package-x86 test0 hello world"
SET2="computer hello sizeof compiler world package-x86 rocks test0"
awk -v s1="$SET1" -v s2="$SET2" 'BEGIN{
    m=split(s1,set1)
    n=split(s2,set2)
    for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
        for (j=1;j<=m;j++){
            if ( set1[j] == set2[i]){
                 delete set2[i]
            }   
        }
    }
    for(i in set2) if (set2[i]!="") {print set2[i]}
}'

output

# ./shell.sh
compiler
rocks
computer
sizeof
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This is, what, O(n) or O(n+m)?

#!/bin/bash
SET1="package-x86 test0 hello world"
SET2="computer hello sizeof compiler world package-x86 rocks test0"
for i in $SET2
do
    [[ ! $SET1 =~ $i  ]] && SET3="${SET3:+${SET3} }$i"
done
echo "..${SET3}.."

Running it:

$ ./script
..computer sizeof compiler rocks..
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It depends on the implementation of the =~ operator in bash. It could be a O(M*N). –  Ilyes Gouta Oct 24 '09 at 9:05

Without using anything bash-specific or external commands:

SET1="package-x86 test0 hello world"
SET2="computer hello sizeof compiler world package-x86 rocks test0"
SET3=

for arg in $SET2; do
  case $SET1 in
    $arg\ * | *\ $arg | *\ $arg\ *) ;;
    *) SET3="$SET3 $arg" ;;
  esac
done
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