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taken from this link, which I came across while trying to figure this out.

Here's the function(modified a bit to try and help myself understand):

(function(){

    fibonacci = (function () {

        var cache = {};
        return function (n) {
            var cached = cache[n];
            if (cached) {
                console.log('already in the ', cache);
                return cached;
            }
            if (n <= 1) {
                console.log('no 0s or 1s, ', n);
                return n;
            }
            console.log('a brand new ', n, 'consider yourself cached');
            cache[n] = fibonacci(n - 2) + fibonacci(n - 1);
            console.log('current cache: ', cache);
            return cache[n];
        };
    }());

    fibonacci(20);

})();

I modified it a little to try and help myself understand, but I get lost because the output goes towards 0, then it increases from 0. I would have thought that in this statement:

cache[n] = fibonacci(n - 2) + fibonacci(n - 1);

fibonacci(n - 2) would be evaluated, then fibonacci(n - 1) right after that.
But even if that was the case, I don't understand how JavaScript would add these two functions together.

Could anyone help me to understand how this works a bit, or at the least, can you maybe help me restructure it in a fashion that may be a bit easier to understand?

Here's the output:

a brand new  20 consider yourself cached 
a brand new  18 consider yourself cached 
a brand new  16 consider yourself cached 
a brand new  14 consider yourself cached 
a brand new  12 consider yourself cached 
a brand new  10 consider yourself cached 
a brand new  8 consider yourself cached 
a brand new  6 consider yourself cached 
a brand new  4 consider yourself cached 
a brand new  2 consider yourself cached 
no 0s or 1s,  0 
no 0s or 1s,  1 
current cache:  Object {2: 1} 
a brand new  3 consider yourself cached 
no 0s or 1s,  1 
already in the  Object {2: 1} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3} 
a brand new  5 consider yourself cached 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3} 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8} 
a brand new  7 consider yourself cached 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8} 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21} 
a brand new  9 consider yourself cached 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21} 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55} 
a brand new  11 consider yourself cached 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55} 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144} 
a brand new  13 consider yourself cached 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144} 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377} 
a brand new  15 consider yourself cached 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377} 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377, 15: 610} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377, 15: 610, 16: 987} 
a brand new  17 consider yourself cached 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377, 15: 610, 16: 987} 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377, 15: 610, 16: 987} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377, 15: 610, 16: 987, 17: 1597} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377, 15: 610, 16: 987, 17: 1597, 18: 2584} 
a brand new  19 consider yourself cached 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377, 15: 610, 16: 987, 17: 1597, 18: 2584} 
already in the  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377, 15: 610, 16: 987, 17: 1597, 18: 2584} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377, 15: 610, 16: 987, 17: 1597, 18: 2584, 19: 4181} 
current cache:  Object {2: 1, 3: 2, 4: 3, 5: 5, 6: 8, 7: 13, 8: 21, 9: 34, 10: 55, 11: 89, 12: 144, 13: 233, 14: 377, 15: 610, 16: 987, 17: 1597, 18: 2584, 19: 4181, 20: 6765} 

Thanks, I know that recursion is probably a large noob question, and I've used it a few times, but understanding how it works makes my head spin.

share|improve this question
    
Please note that you're logging "consider yourself cached" before the recursion, so that's way before the actual caching occurs. – user123444555621 Apr 23 '13 at 5:56
1  
You may want to use Firebug's console.group() feature for better logging. Example: jsfiddle.net/cJ4LT – user123444555621 Apr 23 '13 at 6:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may find it easier if the code is simplified and you start with a smaller number, say 4. The following is functionality identical to what you originally posted:

var cache = {};

function fibonacci(n) {   // assume n = 4
   var cached = cache[n];

The first time through, cache[4] will be undefined, so the following test evaluates to false:

    if (cached) {
        console.log('already in the ', cache);
        return cached;
    }

As n = 4, the following is false too:

    if (n <= 1) {
        console.log('no 0s or 1s, ', n);
        return n;
    }

Then the following lines are executed:

    console.log('a brand new ', n, 'consider yourself cached');  // 4
    cache[n] = fibonacci(n - 2) + fibonacci(n - 1);

which is:

    cache[4] = fibonacci(2) + fibonacci(3);

In the above line, the left hand side is evaluated first, initiating the creation of a '4' property of cache. It isn't actually created yet as the statement isn't finished, so you almost have:

cache = {4:undefined};

Then the right hand side is evaluated to see what will be assigned. Since there is a + operator, both expressions must be evaluated to see whether it is treated as addition or concatenation.

Next fibonacci(2) is evaluated (whether + is addition or concatentation, evaluation proceeds left to right), so the above process repeats, creating:

    cache[2] = fibonacci(0) + fibonacci(1);

and you almost have:

cache = {4:undefined, 2:undefined};

noting that the properties aren't actually created yet.

Now fibonacci(0) is evaluated. This time it gets to the second if and returns 0, so no cache['0'] is created and now you have:

cache[2] = 0 + fibonacci(1);

Again, when evaluating fibonacci(1) the second if statement executes and returns 1, so you have a value to assign so a property is created and the value assigned:

    cache[2] = 0 + 1; // cache = {2:1, 4:undefined}; 

Now that proceeds to the next line:

    console.log('current cache: ', cache);
    return cache[n]; // returns 1;
}

So now the previous call continues:

    cache[4] = 1 + fibonacci(3);

again it gets to:

    cache[3] = fibonacci(1) + fibonacci(2);

The first expression returns 1 from the first if so you have:

    cache[3] = 1 + fibonacci(2);

The second expression gets to the first if, where cache[2] exists so it returns 1 (i.e. the value of cache[2]) and you have:

    cache[3] = 1 + 1; // cache = {3:1, 3:2, 4:undefined};

and then returns cache[3] (which is 2) so you are back at:

    cache[4] = 1 + 2;

and now have cache = {2:1, 3:2, 3:3}

You can write the above as a sequential operation (all recursive functions can be written as sequential operations), which is common where speed matters as sequential operations are always faster. In this case, the sequential function is very simple:

function fibonacci2(n) {
  var fibs = {0:0, 1:1};
  var i = 1;
  while (i < n) {
    fibs[++i] = fibs[i-1] + fibs[i-2];
  }
  return fibs;
}

console.log(fibonacci2(4));
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so so much for this in depth explanation, as it is really helping me understand the output. It will be a few hours before I get to test it out, but I just wanted to show my appreciation right away! – laserface Apr 24 '13 at 2:11
    
i'm counting this as solved, since it's exactly what I asked for and is much easier for me to understand. Thanks again for your help. – laserface Apr 24 '13 at 23:49
    
after going over this for a while, i think that my main confusion was what happens when n gets to 0. for some reason, i forgot that the function just converts itself into the returned value when the function returns, making the evaluation of the two functions with a '+' operator much more digestible... (even if recursion still boggles my mind a bit) – laserface May 4 '13 at 5:11

"I don't understand how JavaScript would add these two functions together."

JS doesn't add functions, it adds the values that return from these function calls. Say that f(n-2) was calculated, when f(n-1) is called it will be calculated by:

f(n-1) = f(n-2) + f(n-3)

and by now, since we calculated both values on the right side of the equation, both values will be taken from the cache.

Let's demonstrate it with an example, suppose we want to calculate f(5):

f(5) = f(4) + f(3)

recursive call with f(3):

f(3) = f(2) + f(1)

recursive call:

f(1) = 1 and f(2) = cached(f(1)) + f(0) = 1 + 0 = 1

now we're coming back up to calc f(3) and we have both values f(2) and f(1) cached, hence:

f(3) = 1 + 1 = 2

coming back up to calc f(4)

f(4) = f(3) + f(2) = 2 + 1 = 3

end again:

f(5) = f(4) + f(3) = 3 + 2 = 5

Pay close attention to the fact that once you reached the deepest point in the recursion (f(1)), all the way back up the cache will be used and none of the values will be calculated, which makes this implementation very efficient!

share|improve this answer
    
This is a mostly correct answer - but won't Javascript evaluate f(4) before f(3) in f(4) + f(3)? – Patashu Apr 23 '13 at 5:25
1  
@Patashu the order of the call doesn't matter cause since this recursion is calculated bottom-up, f(3) will ALWAYS be calculated before f(4). Confusing ? yes a bit, but try to run it manually with numbers like I did and you'll see ;) – alfasin Apr 23 '13 at 5:27
    
Oh yeah, I'm mixing up order of evaluation and order of caching. My bad – Patashu Apr 23 '13 at 5:30
    
Thanks for your answer, I'm going to need a little time to digest it. – laserface Apr 23 '13 at 5:35

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