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My program is six iterations of a loop in which eight people vote for one another. Who each person votes for during each iteration is saved to the private class member voteList (a vector of pointers).

My trouble is that at the end of the six iterations, I want to be able to say, for example, who Anna voted for during each vote, using the GetVote(int) public method I wrote.

*(voteList[round]) should be the value (a person) of who Anna voted for in a given round, I think? And using the GetName() method should retrieve the string of that person's name. But no matter how I fiddle with it, the program crashes whenever I call GetVote().

I'm sure I've made one or more really stupid mistakes, but I can't figure out what the problem is. Any input would be appreciated!

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <random>
#include <time.h>
using namespace std;

enum gender { male, female };

class Person {
    private:
        string personName;
        gender personGender;
        vector<Person *> voteList;
    public:
        // Constructors
        Person (string, gender);
        // Setters
        void Vote (Person * target) {
            voteList.push_back (target); 
        };
        // Getters
        string GetName () { return personName; };
        string GetVote (int round)
        {
            Person ugh = *(voteList[round]);
            return ugh.GetName ();
        };
};

Person::Person (string a, gender b) {
    personName = a;
    personGender = b; }

void Voting (vector<Person> voters)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < voters.size(); i++) {
        int number = (rand() % voters.size());
        Person * myTarget = &voters[number];
        voters[i].Vote (myTarget);
        cout << voters[i].GetName() << " votes for " << voters[number].GetName() << endl;
    }
    cout << endl;
}

int main()
{
    srand(time(0));

    Person Anna ("Anna", female);
    Person Baxter ("Baxter", male);
    Person Caroline ("Caroline", female);
    Person David ("David", male);
    Person Erin ("Erin", female);
    Person Frank ("Frank", male);
    Person Gemma ("Gemma", female);
    Person Hassan ("Hassan", male);

    vector<Person> theGroup;
    theGroup.push_back (Anna);
    theGroup.push_back (Baxter);
    theGroup.push_back (Caroline);
    theGroup.push_back (David);
    theGroup.push_back (Erin);
    theGroup.push_back (Frank);
    theGroup.push_back (Gemma);
    theGroup.push_back (Hassan);

    for (int n = 0, iterations = (theGroup.size() - 2); n <= iterations; n++)
        Voting (theGroup);

    cout << "ANNA VOTED FOR...";
    for (int n = 0; n <= 5; n++)
    {
        cout << "Round " << (n + 1) << ": " << Anna.GetVote(n) << '\n';
    }

    cin.ignore();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
afaik std::vector will allocate the objects on the heap, so it would be no point in allocating memory to store a pointer to another heap space. but anyways ... your GetVote(int) member needs a check if the round is less or equal the count of objects of your voteList. the rest is explained by Nbr44 ;) –  Zaiborg Apr 23 '13 at 6:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First of all you're copying your Person objects all over the place. For example when adding your Person objects to the theGroup vector and again when passing that same vector to the Voting function.

Copying persons doesn't semantically make any sense. In order to avoid this you should add a private copy constructor and assignment operator to your Person class:

private:
    Person(const Person& other);
    Person& operator=(const Person& rhs);

Next you're going to have to change your vectors to use Person pointers:

    vector<Person *> theGroup;
    theGroup.push_back (&Anna);
    theGroup.push_back (&Baxter);
    theGroup.push_back (&Caroline);
    theGroup.push_back (&David);
    theGroup.push_back (&Erin);
    theGroup.push_back (&Frank);
    theGroup.push_back (&Gemma);
    theGroup.push_back (&Hassan);

You can use the -> operator to call methods on pointers to objects, like so:

    string GetVote (int round)
    {
        Person *ugh = voteList[round];
        return ugh->GetName ();
    };

And:

void Voting (const vector<Person *>& voters)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < voters.size(); i++) {
        int number = (rand() % voters.size());
        Person *myTarget = voters[number];
        voters[i]->Vote (myTarget);
        cout << voters[i]->GetName() << " votes for " << voters[number]->GetName() << endl;
    }
    cout << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, this worked beautifully, thank you! I didn't even realize that I was copying my objects. As you can probably tell, I'm rather new at this. :( –  user1814179 Apr 23 '13 at 6:39

When you call voting you pass a copy of the vector, and the contents will be copied as well.

You should pass this vector as a reference:

void Voting (vector<Person>& voters) { ... }

You might also want to add some safety checks in GetVote to make sure the caller doesn't supply an index out of bounds.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It was the lack of reference, among other things. And good call on the safety checks, working them in now. –  user1814179 Apr 23 '13 at 6:40
void Voting (vector<Person> voters)

You want to make this a reference. Otherwise, when you get the address of voters[number], you're getting the address of a local variable of your function - making everything go bananas once you try to actually use it.

void Voting (vector<Person> &voters)

Actually that wasn't exactly the problem, although that's still related to references. You are passing your original vector by copy, which means the original vector (in the main function) is not going to be modified by the function's operations (same goes for its contents, of course). So, all the Persons inside have their original state, with an empty voteList vector. Obviously, if you try to dereference any of its (non-existent) elements, that's not going to go well !

share|improve this answer
    
I reworked everything so that it's referring to the originals rather than the copy, and it's working like a charm. Thanks! –  user1814179 Apr 23 '13 at 6:41

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