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Noob here, I'd like to extend the class, get a class literal, use it as a type parameter, or cast to it.

Currently I can instantiate my ASM generated class and invoke it's methods with reflection, but the class is of the wrong type.

Yes, the compiler doesn't know about the class until runtime, but in this case there is nothing I don't know about the class, but how can I convince the compiler?

I already have a workaround, but I'm still curious what this kind of "type-spoofing" would involve (Reflection? AST manipulation? Hacking the typechecker?).

I asked a similar question with a "Java" tag, posting to "Scala" hoping that the scala compiler is currently a hotter topic. Thanks very much for your input, -Julian

--Example Below of Needing a Class Type--

Without bytecode generation:

  class B {
      val hello = "Hello B!"
    }

    object HelloScala {
      def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
        val b = new B
        println(b.hello)
      }
    }

With bytecode generation:

HelloScala.scala:

    object HelloScala {
      def main(args: Array[String]): Unit = {
        val b = DumpLoader.loadClass("B", BDump.dump())
        //println(b.hello) //error: Value hello is not a member of Class[?0]
        val b_ = b.getDeclaredConstructor().newInstance()
        //println(b_.hello) //error: Value hello is not a member of Any
      }

   }

BDump.java bytecode generating code:

        import java.util.*;
        import org.objectweb.asm.*;
        //import org.objectweb.asm.attrs.*;
        public class BDump implements Opcodes {

        public static byte[] dump () throws Exception {

        ClassWriter cw = new ClassWriter(0);
        FieldVisitor fv;
        MethodVisitor mv;
        AnnotationVisitor av0;

        cw.visit(V1_6, ACC_PUBLIC + ACC_SUPER, "B", null, "java/lang/Object", null);

        {
        av0 = cw.visitAnnotation("Lscala/reflect/ScalaSignature;", true);
        av0.visit("bytes", "\u0006\u0001y1A!\u0001\u0002\u0001\u000b\u0009\u0009!IC\u0001\u0004\u0003\u001daT-\u001c9usz\u001a\u0001a\u0005\u0002\u0001\rA\u0011qAC\u0007\u0002\u0011)\u0009\u0011\"A\u0003tG\u0006d\u0017-\u0003\u0002\u000c\u0011\u00091\u0011I\\=SK\u001aDQ!\u0004\u0001\u0005\u00029\u0009a\u0001P5oSRtD#A\u0008\u0011\u0005A\u0001Q\"\u0001\u0002\u0009\u000fI\u0001!\u0019!C\u0001'\u0005)\u0001.\u001a7m_V\u0009A\u0003\u0005\u0002\u001655\u0009aC\u0003\u0002\u00181\u0005!A.\u00198h\u0015\u0005I\u0012\u0001\u00026bm\u0006L!a\u0007\u000c\u0003\rM#(/\u001b8h\u0011\u0019i\u0002\u0001)A\u0005)\u00051\u0001.\u001a7m_\u0002\u0002");
        av0.visitEnd();
        }
        // ATTRIBUTE ScalaSig
        {
        fv = cw.visitField(ACC_PRIVATE + ACC_FINAL, "hello", "Ljava/lang/String;", null, null);
        fv.visitEnd();
        }
        {
        mv = cw.visitMethod(ACC_PUBLIC, "hello", "()Ljava/lang/String;", null, null);
        mv.visitCode();
        mv.visitVarInsn(ALOAD, 0);
        mv.visitFieldInsn(GETFIELD, "B", "hello", "Ljava/lang/String;");
        mv.visitInsn(ARETURN);
        mv.visitMaxs(1, 1);
        mv.visitEnd();
        }
        {
        mv = cw.visitMethod(ACC_PUBLIC, "<init>", "()V", null, null);
        mv.visitCode();
        mv.visitVarInsn(ALOAD, 0);
        mv.visitMethodInsn(INVOKESPECIAL, "java/lang/Object", "<init>", "()V");
        mv.visitVarInsn(ALOAD, 0);
        mv.visitLdcInsn("Hello B!");
        mv.visitFieldInsn(PUTFIELD, "B", "hello", "Ljava/lang/String;");
        mv.visitInsn(RETURN);
        mv.visitMaxs(2, 1);
        mv.visitEnd();
        }
        cw.visitEnd();

        return cw.toByteArray();
        }
        }
share|improve this question
2  
Have you tried structural types? –  Eugene Burmako Apr 23 '13 at 15:56
    
Eugene, thank you for the great suggestion! And thank you more for your contributions to Scala. Structural types offer some magic: I can call methods "normally", and use the structural type as a type parameter. But I can't extend it (maybe not a problem), and I'm getting a Manifest is invariant for type T error since the structural type seems to be an Object. The error may be surmountable, but I'm afraid that this strategy only changes my problem from runtime class definition to runtime type definition. I stubbornly wonder if I can spoof whatever's needed to satisfy the compiler. A Tree? –  Julian Peeters May 3 '13 at 3:24
    
PS - I'm not sure if it's helpful info, but if I have my dynamically generated class extend a supertype, then I can cast an instance to the supertype and treat it like its parent. Works, but not ideal for a few reasons. –  Julian Peeters May 3 '13 at 3:28
    
Just wanted to suggest the thing that you wrote in PS :) –  Eugene Burmako May 3 '13 at 14:22
1  
Allright, if you really don't want to deal with structural types, what about dynamics? docs.scala-lang.org/sips/pending/type-dynamic.html –  Eugene Burmako May 3 '13 at 14:23

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