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suppose i have a repo name core. core is the upstream repository. i then have fork, which is core + commits that will never be pushed to core. what is the correct way to keep the fork up to date with commits in core?

right now, from fork, i simply do git pull core master. this works, but what happens is it includes previous commits, so when I look at my github log, i see duplicates of a lot of commits.

is this the correct way to do this? is there a better way?

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1 Answer 1

it includes previous commits, so when I look at my github log, i see duplicates of a lot of commits.

This should not be happening. If you want to maintain your fork, you can use

git pull core master

or you can rebase the changes

git pull --rebase core master

or you can maintain a Topic Branch.

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or just git pull --rebase upstream master –  aragaer Apr 23 '13 at 7:54
    
okay. this was my issue with your previous suggestion. it seemed to be the same as this, but just in a more roundabout way and you didn't explain why. i'm going to try with --rebase on the next pull (i've been doing without) and report back. –  Jonathan Ong Apr 24 '13 at 2:05
    
okay... so i think it wants me to rebase the entire commit history instead of just the recent history. this is just tedious, but it might have worked if i did it from the beginning. ideas? or should i just go through with it? –  Jonathan Ong Apr 25 '13 at 5:00

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