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I have a string such as <html><body><div id="message">Hello World!</div></body></html> and I would like to get the content of the #message element without parsing the HTML myself.

I thought maybe I could create a document object from a string in Gecko (this is for a Firefox add on) but I don't see any simple way.

I noticed that there is a createDocument method, but that doesn't take a string. I'd have to strip the <html> portion from the text, and then again I'm starting to assume stuff.

Anyone have any ideas? Thanks.

EDIT: This seems to work for me:

doc = document.implementation.createDocument( "http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml", "html", null );
doc.firstChild.innerHTML = '<html><body><div id="message">Hello World!</div></body></html>';
node = doc.getElementById( "message" ); 
alert( node.innerHTML );
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1  
You should add a new answer with your edit. –  brianpeiris Oct 23 '09 at 23:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Where do you get the string from? If it's XML, you could get away with using DOMParser.

Otherwise, you have to create an HTML document - https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Parsing_HTML_From_Chrome.

The fact that just using createDocument works seems suspicious, because people used more complicated solutions all this time.

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I get it from a remote source via an xhr. –  Bjorn Tipling Oct 25 '09 at 7:03
    
I will try the domparser method too, just curious if it works and is simpler. Thank you. –  Bjorn Tipling Oct 25 '09 at 7:04
    
Yeah, but who controls what format that remote source returns data in? –  Nickolay Oct 25 '09 at 9:22

Don't like answering my own question, but this seems to have worked for me:

doc = document.implementation.createDocument( "http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml", "html", null );
doc.firstChild.innerHTML = '<html><body><div id="message">Hello World!</div></body></html>';
node = doc.getElementById( "message" ); 
alert( node.innerHTML );
share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget to declare variables. –  kangax Oct 25 '09 at 4:46
    
They are declared in a single, comma separated line at the beginning of the method. We use jslint. –  Bjorn Tipling Oct 25 '09 at 7:01

Is it always that syntax? If so, why not use a regex?

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my thoughts exactly –  pstanton Oct 23 '09 at 23:00
    
It may or may not be always that syntax. –  Bjorn Tipling Oct 23 '09 at 23:05

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