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I have an element like so:

<div id="foo">
  <a href="#" class="some">click me</a>
  <div id="bar">
     <a href="#" class="some">click me too</a>
  </div>
</div>

and I need to select the a elements that are not inside bar. Problem is I can't use children(), because my foo is much more complex than above.

Question:
Is there a way to select "some" elements from a foo and explicitly excluding "some" elements from bar?

share|improve this question
1  
I am far from being a selector ninja ;-) Can someone explain me why $('a:not(#bar a)') wouldn't work ? Please. – jbl Apr 23 '13 at 8:48
1  
hm... it does sound selector-ninja-esque :-) – frequent Apr 23 '13 at 8:49
    
$('#foo a.some:not(#foo #bar a.some)') would seem ninja-wannabe. Bon courage ;-) – jbl Apr 23 '13 at 9:06
    
@frequent: what if bar contains another a with a different class, other than some. Would you want that element part of the selection or not? I'm asking because the selector would be a little more complex then. – François Wahl Apr 23 '13 at 9:08
1  
@FrançoisWahl: No. I just need a.some, so all other link elements should be ignored – frequent Apr 23 '13 at 9:16
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the anchor elements may not always be a direct child of foo you can use the filter() method.

var anchors = $("#foo a").filter(function(){
    return !$("#bar").find(this).length;
});

Working Example http://jsfiddle.net/v63tC/

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ah. this looks good. a will not be a direct child of #foo, so this should help. – frequent Apr 23 '13 at 8:40
    
Ha i was also about to write the same. – Jai Apr 23 '13 at 8:40
    
Where in the solution is class some taken into account? As far as I can understand OP wants to select elements with the class of some from foo and explicitly exclude elements from bar with class of some. I would assume the class some would have to be part of the selector then. – François Wahl Apr 23 '13 at 8:53
    
Ok. This works. As per @FrançoisWahl comment, could you update $('#foo a') to $('#foo a.some'). Then it should be ok. – frequent Apr 23 '13 at 9:04

You can use .filter() along with $.contains() to solve this

var $bar = $('#bar');
var items = $('#foo a.some').filter(function() {
    return !$.contains($bar[0], this)
})

Demo: Fiddle

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May be with a > direct child notation:

$('#foo > a')

You can omit some elem with .not():

$("#foo a").not('#bar a').length;

Fiddle

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Since you mentioned that your #foo element is considerably more complex than the example, is it safe to assume that it's not just direct descendants that you'll need to be selecting? If that is the case, I'd suggest the following:

$('#foo a.some').filter(function() {
    return $(this).parents('#bar').length === 0;
});

That selects all <a> elements inside of #foo, then filters them down so that only those that don't have an ancestor with the id of bar on them are kept.

share|improve this answer
    
Where in the solution is class some taken into account? As far as I can understand OP wants to select elements with the class of some from foo and explicitly exclude elements from bar with class of some. I would assume the class some would have to be part of the selector then. – François Wahl Apr 23 '13 at 8:55
1  
@FrançoisWahl Ah, I think you're right - I missed that "some" was supposed to indicate it's a class, rather than just a vague approximation of a number of elements. They should be able to adapt the answer for themselves to add a class to the selector but I'll edit. – Anthony Grist Apr 23 '13 at 9:08

You can do that (assuming the variable foo is your #foo)

var a = foo.find('> a');
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You can use child selectors for accomplishing your first task (getting all <a> elements from foo):

$('#foo > a'). ...
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