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Is it possible to design a C# class that when querying it through reflections will mark itself as positive IsValueType and positive IsClass?

Or are they actually mutually exclusive markings?

I know that,

Most primitive types will return (including enums & structs):
IsValueType=true, IsClass=false.

String or any class - abstracts too.. return:
IsValueType=false, IsClass=true.

Interfaces returns:
IsValueType=false, IsClass=false

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1  
What is your use case actually? – ken2k Apr 23 '13 at 8:37
    
Just building some simple persistence manager for objects to save into some sort of flat files and I want it to include the widest range of types. but regardless I always wondered about it :) – G.Y Apr 23 '13 at 8:39
1  
Just satisfy following requirements: ValueType: this.IsSubclassOf(RuntimeType.ValueType);, Class: (((this.GetAttributeFlagsImpl() & TypeAttributes.Interface) == TypeAttributes.AutoLayout) && !this.IsValueType); – sll Apr 23 '13 at 8:40
3  
@sll: Is it just me, or is your condition the perfect explanation of why they are mutually exclusive? :) – Elad Lachmi Apr 23 '13 at 8:43
1  
@G.Y It's not possible to have a type that will be both IsValueType and IsClass, see !this.IsValueType line in IsClass implementation in my answer – taras.roshko Apr 23 '13 at 9:06
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Is it possible to design a C# class that when querying it through reflections will mark itself as positive IsValueType and positive IsClass?

Let's take a look on these implementations:

protected virtual bool IsValueTypeImpl()
{
      return this.IsSubclassOf((Type) RuntimeType.ValueType);
}

public bool IsClass
{
  [__DynamicallyInvokable] get
  {
    if ((this.GetAttributeFlagsImpl() & TypeAttributes.ClassSemanticsMask) == TypeAttributes.NotPublic)
      return !this.IsValueType;
    else
      return false;
  }
}

As you can see, IsValueTypeImpl() (which is called by IsValueType property) depends on inheritance AND IsClass depends on IsValueType (!).

Next, this description of ValueType states that it's not possible to inherit from ValueType directly.

So, the answer is no, you cannot create type which will be IsClass and IsValueType at the same time

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1  
That first method is marked as virtual, implying there may be different implementations of this method. – Buh Buh Apr 23 '13 at 9:58
    
@BuhBuh but the second method is not virtual making sure it can never happen.. – G.Y Apr 23 '13 at 17:51
    
@BuhBuh can it change? sure, all in all, it's internal framework code, it can change, but i really doubt that public behavior can change, a lot of third party code can depend on it. – taras.roshko Apr 23 '13 at 18:58

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