Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider this simple SFINAE test to determine if a type can be an argument to std::begin

#include <utility>

    template <class T> constexpr auto
std_begin_callable (T const*) -> decltype (std::begin (std::declval <T>()), bool ()) 
{ return true; }

    template <class> constexpr bool
std_begin_callable (...) 
{ return false; }

#include <array>

static_assert (std_begin_callable <std::array <int, 3>> (0), "failed");

int main () {}

Note that the array header, in which the specialization for std::begin is defined, is included after the SFINAE functions. The assertion fails. Now if I move the #include <array> before, it works. (gcc 4.8.0 20130411, clang version 3.2)

I don't understand why. The SFINAE functions being templates, shouldn't they be instanciated when needed, in the static assertion, after the inclusion of the header defining the function they test?

The problem is that my SFINAE being in a header, I must ensure that it is included after any other container header (this issue is not specifically linked to the array header).

share|improve this question
    
It's undefined behaviour to add specializations to a template after the template has already been used elsewhere. –  Kerrek SB Apr 23 '13 at 8:38
    
@KerrekSB: Are you sure that is relevant in this case? After all, the first use that would cause an implicit instantiation is in the static_assert –  Andy Prowl Apr 23 '13 at 8:42
    
@AndyProwl: I'm like 90% sure or so. I believe this has been discussed before, and that's the conclusion we came to. I might be wrong, of course. –  Kerrek SB Apr 23 '13 at 8:44
    
@KerrekSB: I see. I am not sure how to interpret 14.7.3/6: "If a template, a member template or a member of a class template is explicitly specialized then that specialization shall be declared before the first use of that specialization that would cause an implicit instantiation to take place, in every translation unit in which such a use occurs". –  Andy Prowl Apr 23 '13 at 8:46
2  
Whaaaat. First of all, begin and end are defined in <iterator>. Next, <array> doesn't have any specialization of those two, the ones that forward to member begin/end suffice completely. Also, you can't partially specialize function templates, so it'd never work for std::array anyways. –  Xeo Apr 23 '13 at 8:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As Xeo said, to make it work you must #include <iterator> to bring in the appropriate definition of begin. More precisely, this works:

#include <iterator>
#include <utility>

template <class T> constexpr auto
std_begin_callable (T const*) -> decltype (std::begin (std::declval <T>()), bool ()) 
{ return true; }

template <class> constexpr bool
std_begin_callable (...) 
{ return false; }

#include <array>

static_assert (std_begin_callable <std::array <int, 3>> (0), "failed");

int main () {}

Now, let's see why the original code which doesn't include <iterator> compiles but doesn't give the expected result (unless you move the #include <array> up).

The inclusion of <utility> indirectly implies the inclusion of <initializer_list> which defines std::begin(std::initializer_list<T>). Therefore, in this translation unit the name std::begin is visible.

However, when you call std_begin_callable the first overload is SFINAEd away because the visible std::begin cannot take a std::array.

Now, if you remove the inclusions of <iterator> and <utility> altogether (keeping <array> after std_begin_callable), then compilation fails because the compiler will no longer see any overload of std::begin or std::declval:

template <class T> constexpr auto
std_begin_callable (T const*) -> decltype (std::begin (std::declval <T>()), bool ()) 
{ return true; } // error: begin/declval is not a member of std

template <class> constexpr bool
std_begin_callable (...) 
{ return false; }

#include <array>

static_assert (std_begin_callable <std::array <int, 3>> (0), "failed");

int main () {}

Finally, you can replicate/simplify the previous erroneous behavior with this:

namespace std {

  void begin();

  template <typename T>
  T&& declval();

}

template <class T> constexpr auto
std_begin_callable (T const*) -> decltype (std::begin (std::declval <T>()), bool ()) 
{ return true; } // No compiler error here, just SFINAE.

template <class> constexpr bool
std_begin_callable (...) 
{ return false; }

#include <array>

static_assert (std_begin_callable <std::array <int, 3>> (0), "failed");

int main () {}

Update:

From the comments (here and in the OP) I guess it's not possible to solve the header file order issue in the way you wanted. Let me suggest then, a workaround based on ADL that's close to a solution and, possibly (but may be not), good enough for your use case:

// <your_header_file>
#include <iterator>
#include <utility>

namespace detail {

    using std::begin;

    template <typename T, typename = decltype(begin(*((T*)0)))>
    constexpr std::true_type std_begin_callable(int) { return std::true_type(); }

    template <typename>
    constexpr std::false_type std_begin_callable(long) { return std::false_type(); };

};

template <typename T>
constexpr auto std_begin_callable() ->
  decltype(detail::std_begin_callable<typename std::remove_reference<T>::type>(0)) {
  return detail::std_begin_callable<typename std::remove_reference<T>::type>(0);
}
// </your_header_file>   

// <a_supposedly_std_header_file>
namespace std {
    struct foo { int begin() /* const */; }; 
    struct bar;
    int begin(/*const*/ bar&);

    template <typename T> struct goo;

    template <typename T>
    int begin(/*const*/ goo<T>&);
}
// </a_supposedly_std_header_file>

// <a_3rd_party_header_file>
namespace ns {

    struct foo { int begin() /*const*/; };
    struct bar;
    int begin(/*const*/ bar&);

    template <typename T> struct goo;

    template <typename T>
    int begin(/*const*/ goo<T>&);

}
// </a_3rd_party_header_file>

//<some_tests>
static_assert ( std_begin_callable</*const*/ std::foo>(), "failed");
static_assert ( std_begin_callable</*const*/ std::bar>(), "failed");
static_assert ( std_begin_callable</*const*/ std::goo<int>>(), "failed");

static_assert ( std_begin_callable</*const*/ ns::foo>(), "failed");
static_assert ( std_begin_callable</*const*/ ns::bar>(), "failed");
static_assert ( std_begin_callable</*const*/ ns::goo<int>>(), "failed");
//</some_tests>

int main () {}

It seems to work but I haven't fully tested. I suggest you to try several combinations with/without the commented out consts in the code.

I used *((T*)0) instead of std::declval<T>() because a constness issue. To see it, put declval back, and try the static_assert for const ns::foo leaving ns::foo::begin non-const.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your detailed answer. –  manu Apr 24 '13 at 8:05
    
And if I'm not completely mistaken (again), regarding the comments of @Andy Prowl, the "first use" of the begin template is during the declaration of the SFINAE functions and hence, any specialization should occur before. In other words, replacing array by valarray (or by a custom class specializing begin) would break your first example, wouldn't it? (I'm still concerned about the order of inclusion of headers, last point in my original post.) –  manu Apr 24 '13 at 8:35
    
Apparently that's the case, I'm afraid :-( For instance, static_assert (std_begin_callable <foo> (0), "failed"); will fire or not depending on whether class foo{}; namespace std { int begin(const foo&); } preceeds or follows the definition of std_begin_callable. –  Cassio Neri Apr 24 '13 at 9:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.