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I have a vector with int elements and a vector with float elements. In that case most preffered type is float and in dot product I want to return a float type (if not specified).

The following code does just this, but something goes wrong with template packs.

Can I have a little bit of help?

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <array>
using namespace std;


template<typename Tp, typename T1> struct contains
{
    constexpr static bool value = std::is_same<Tp, T1>::value;
};
template<typename Tp, typename T1, typename ... Tn> struct contains
{
    constexpr static bool value = std::is_same<Tp, T1>::value || contains<Tp, Tn...>::value;
};

template<typename ... T> struct perfect
{
    typedef 
        typename std::conditional<contains<long double, T...>::value, long double,
        typename std::conditional<contains<double     , T...>::value, double,
        typename std::conditional<contains<float      , T...>::value, float,
        typename std::conditional<contains<long long  , T...>::value, long long,
        typename std::conditional<contains<unsigned long long, T...>::value, unsigned long long,
        typename std::conditional<contains<int        , T...>::value, int,
        typename std::conditional<contains<unsigned int, T...>::value, unsigned int,
        //.....
        void
        >>>>>>>::type type;
};


struct Vector1 : public std::vector<double> {};
struct Vector2 : public std::vector<int> {};
struct Vector3 : public std::vector<float> {};

template<typename C1, typename C2, typename T = perfect<typename C1::value_type, typename C2::value_type>::type>
T dot_product(const C1 &c1, const C2 &c2)
{
    return 0; // return c1 * c2
} 

int main()
{
    Vector1 a;
    Vector2 b;
    cout << dot_product(a, b) << endl;
    cout << dot_product<Vector1, Vector2, long double>(a, b) << endl;
}
share|improve this question
    
In many cases integers are more accurate than floats. What do you mean by most-accurate? – deepmax Apr 23 '13 at 12:07
    
A vector dot product of int's is an int. Making it a float may well give you precision errors. Why do you say float is more accurate? – Roger Rowland Apr 23 '13 at 12:08
    
@RogerRowland I mean that if T is not specified, create a type from a list of types with some precedence. 'Accurate' is not a good word for this. – Chameleon Apr 23 '13 at 12:12
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're looking for decltype<C1() * C2()>, no need for your struct perfect.

share|improve this answer
    
You mean: decltype(C1::value_type() * C2::value_type()). Yes! – Chameleon Apr 23 '13 at 18:36

You are missing two things here.

template<typename Tp, typename T1> struct contains
{
    constexpr static bool value = std::is_same<Tp, T1>::value;
};

is a specialization so it should be

template<typename Tp, typename T1> struct contains<T1,Tp>
                                               // ^^^^^^ 
{
    constexpr static bool value = std::is_same<Tp, T1>::value;
};

and it should be defined after the original template.


Next you are missing typename here.

template<typename C1, typename C2, typename T = typename perfect<typename C1::value_type, typename C2::value_type>::type>
                                             // ^^^^^^^ 

However I should mention that you are probably over complicating it here. I am not sure if all of this is necessary for deduction from two types. Maybe pre-processor macros can do this much better for you. I am assuming this is an exercise.



EDIT:
OK Here is a similar operation but different approach from C++ Templates a Complete Guide . Old but still enough for your options

#define MK_PROMOTION(T1,T2,Tr)             \
    template<> class Promotion<T1, T2> {   \
      public:                              \
        typedef Tr type;                   \
    };                                     \
                                           \
    template<> class Promotion<T2, T1> {   \
      public:                              \
        typedef Tr type;                   \
    };



template<typename T1, typename T2>
class Promotion {
public:
    typedef T1 type;    
};


template<typename T>
class Promotion<T,T> {
  public:
    typedef T type;
};

MK_PROMOTION(int, char, int)
MK_PROMOTION(double, float, double)
MK_PROMOTION(double, int, double)




typedef std::vector<double> Vector1;
typedef std::vector<int> Vector2;
typedef std::vector<float> Vector3;


template<typename C1, typename C2, typename T = typename Promotion< typename C1::value_type, typename C2::value_type >::type >
T dot_product(const C1 &c1, const C2 &c2)
{
    return 0; // return c1 * c2
} 

int main()
{
    Vector1 a;
    Vector2 b;
    cout << dot_product(a, b) << endl;
    cout << dot_product<Vector1, Vector2, long double>(a, b) << endl;
}
share|improve this answer

EDIT: decltype() does it better.

template<typename C1, typename C2, typename T = decltype(typename C1::value_type() * typename C2::value_type())>
T dot_product(const C1 &c1, const C2 &c2) { return 5; }

Fixed program for future community need: (many syntactic errors)

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

template<typename Tp, typename T1, typename ... Tn> struct contains_type
    { constexpr static bool value = std::is_same<Tp, T1>::value || contains_type<Tp, Tn...>::value; };
template<typename Tp, typename T1> struct contains_type<Tp, T1>
    { constexpr static bool value = std::is_same<Tp, T1>::value; };

template<typename ... T> struct type_promotion
{
    typedef typename
        std::conditional<contains_type<long double, T...>::value, long double,
        typename std::conditional<contains_type<double     , T...>::value, double,
        typename std::conditional<contains_type<float      , T...>::value, float,
        typename std::conditional<contains_type<long long  , T...>::value, long long,
        typename std::conditional<contains_type<unsigned long long, T...>::value, unsigned long long,
        typename std::conditional<contains_type<int        , T...>::value, int,
        typename std::conditional<contains_type<unsigned int, T...>::value, unsigned int,
        void>::type>::type>::type>::type>::type>::type>::type type;
};


struct Vector1 : public std::vector<double> {};
struct Vector2 : public std::vector<int> {};

template<typename C1, typename C2, typename T = typename type_promotion<typename C1::value_type, typename C2::value_type>::type>
T dot_product(const C1 &c1, const C2 &c2)
    { return 5; } 

int main()
{
    Vector1 a;
    Vector2 b, c;
    cout << dot_product(a, b) / 2 << endl;
    cout << dot_product(b, c) / 2 << endl;
    cout << dot_product<Vector1, Vector2, long double>(a, b) << endl;
}
share|improve this answer

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