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im using WPF/MVVM to fool around with a treeview control

<TreeView HorizontalAlignment="Left" 
                  Height="319" 
                  VerticalAlignment="Top" 
                  Width="517"
                  ItemsSource="{Binding Tree}"
                  >
            <TreeView.ItemTemplate>
                <HierarchicalDataTemplate ItemsSource="{Binding Children}">
                    <StackPanel Orientation="Horizontal">
                        <Button Width="100" Height="20" IsEnabled="{Binding IsEnabled}" Content="{Binding Name}" />
                    </StackPanel>
                </HierarchicalDataTemplate>
            </TreeView.ItemTemplate>
        </TreeView>

And this is my viewmodel with the node class

public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        class TreeNode
        {
            public string Name { get; set; }
            public bool IsEnabled { get; set; }
            public List<TreeNode> Children { get; set; }
            public TreeNode()
            {
                Children = new List<TreeNode>();
                IsEnabled = true;
            }
        }

        class ViewModel
        {
            public List<TreeNode> Tree { get; private set; }
            public ViewModel()
            {
                Tree = new List<TreeNode>();
            }
        }

        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            var viewModel = new ViewModel
                {
                    Tree =
                        {
                            new TreeNode
                                {
                                    Name = "Root 1",
                                    IsEnabled = false,
                                    Children = {
                                        new TreeNode { Name = "Child 1" },
                                        new TreeNode { Name = "Child 2" },
                                        new TreeNode { Name = "Child 3", 
                                            Children =
                                                {
                                                    new TreeNode { Name = "Child 3-1" },
                                                    new TreeNode { Name = "Child 3-2" },
                                                    new TreeNode { Name = "Child 3-3" }, 
                                                }
                                        },
                                    }
                                }
                        }
                };

            DataContext = viewModel;
        }
    }

As you can see, i bind the property "IsEnabled" to the button, this is all good, but i actually want to bind the "IsEnabled" property to the actual root node element, not a object within the node.

What would i need to do to disable the entire root node based on this property value?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To do this, you actually need to affect the ItemContainerStyle for the TreeView. This sets the style for the ItemContainer (TreeViewItem) that is generated for each node of the Tree.

<TreeView HorizontalAlignment="Left" Height="319" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="517" ItemsSource="{Binding Tree}">
    <TreeView.ItemTemplate>
        <!-- Leave this the same, except for the IsEnabled binding on the button -->
    </TreeView.ItemTemplate>
    <TreeView.ItemContainerStyle>
        <Style TargetType="{x:Type TreeViewItem}">
            <Setter Property="IsEnabled" Value="{Binding IsEnabled}"/>
        </Style>
    </TreeView.ItemContainerStyle>
</TreeView>
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I was barking up that tree but was implementing it in the wrong way, thanks for showing me the right way to do it :) –  Swift Apr 23 '13 at 13:32
    
No problem, glad to help. I often get confused between the ItemTemplates and the ItemContainerStyles and which is used for what! Sometimes a quick reminder is all it takes. –  Brian S Apr 23 '13 at 13:34

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