Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an enum like that:

enum {
  ID_FOO = 0,
  ID_BAR,
  ID_BAZ
}

And a constant array using designated initializers like hat:

char* arr[] = {
  [ID_FOO] = "foo stuff",
  [ID_BAR] = "bar stuff",
  [ID_BAZ] = "baz stuff",
  0
}

Now when I add a value to the enum, e.g. after ID_FOO but forget to add it to the array, then I would get an uninitialized null-initialized 'hole' in the array. Is there any way to prevent that, or at least get a warning from the compiler?

A non-portable GCC-only solution is fine.

share|improve this question
5  
If there is any initialiser at all, elements without explicit initialiser are initialised to (a type-appropriate value of) zero, so there's no uninitialised hole. But I guess you want to be warned about the default null pointers here? –  Daniel Fischer Apr 23 '13 at 13:29
    
@DanielFischer yes, I don't want any null pointers in between. –  Michael Apr 23 '13 at 13:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One way is to add a sentinel maximum value to your enum, which you can use to verify that this maximum value is the same as the number of elements in the array.

enum {
    ID_FOO = 0,
    ID_BAR,
    ID_BAZ,
    // insert new values here

    ID_MAX
}

assert(ID_MAX == (sizeof(arr)/sizeof(arr[0]) - 1));

This is a runtime check; have a look at C compiler asserts - how to implement? for ideas on how to get a compile-time error instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Would kind of work. But I really don't like the runtime assert and static asserts seem to be ugly in C. –  Michael Apr 23 '13 at 14:47
    
Yes. I'm going with GCC 4.6, therefore I have _Static_assert. –  Michael Apr 23 '13 at 16:50

you can use X-Macros to keep them in sync, although some may argue about the prettiness of the resulting code.

The idea is to take all the information you need for both structures and put it into a single macro:

entries.inc

ENTRY(ID_FOO, "foo stuff")
ENTRY(ID_BAR, "bar stuff")
ENTRY(ID_BAZ, "baz stuff")

And then later, redefine your macro such that for each structure you need to build, you pull out the appropriate part from your data:

foo.c

/* here define what entry should be for your enums */
#define ENTRY(id, name) id,

enum {
#include "entries.inc"
};

/* and then redefine for the char array and include again */
#undef  ENTRY
#define ENTRY(id, name) [id] = name,

char* arr[] = {
  #include "entries.inc"
  0
};


int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
  /* whatever */
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.