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Have a .csv with 4 columns of values:

data<-read.csv("C:\\Users\\mtatange\\Desktop\\Dataset.csv")
A         B        C        D   
1         1       NA        1   
2         2        4        1   
3         3        6        4   
4        NA        8        5

data$E<-do.call(paste,c(data[c("A","B","C","D")], sep=""))
data
A         B        C        D       E        
1         1       NA        1      11NA1 
2         2        4        1      2241
3         3        6        4      3364 
4        NA        8        5      4NA85

summary(data)
E
Length: 4
Class: Character
Mode: Character

I need column "E" to be a vector, it cannot stay as a character variable. I tried:

data$E[is.na(a$E)]<-0

But that still left the column as a character variable. How do I convert the column to a vector variable?

share|improve this question
    
If you replace NA to 0 in data (before getting E), then you can do data$E <- as.numeric(do.call(paste0, data)) –  Arun Apr 23 '13 at 13:55
    
How would I do that? This is a test example, in the dataset there are 6000 entries. –  Mark Apr 23 '13 at 13:57
    
do what? replace NA? data[is.na(data)] <- 0. –  Arun Apr 23 '13 at 14:01
    
Sorry I should have clarified, I cannot replace every NA missing value in the entire dataset with O, only this "E" column. –  Mark Apr 23 '13 at 14:03
    
Mark - why not? 6000 is not very many entries! And it is far quicker to replace NAs in the dataset than it will be to gsub out NA entries in data$E afterwards! –  Simon O'Hanlon Apr 23 '13 at 14:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Get rid of the NA's first..:

df[ is.na(df) ] <- 0
df$E <- apply(df,1,function(x) as.numeric(paste0(x , collapse="")))
  A B C D    E
1 1 1 0 1 1101
2 2 2 4 1 2241
3 3 3 6 4 3364
4 4 0 8 5 4085

apply(df , 2 , class )
        A         B         C         D         E 
"numeric" "numeric" "numeric" "numeric" "numeric" 

The solution above gives you the idea. Alternatively, a (relatively) faster way of doing this is:

df[ is.na(df) ] <- 0
df$E <- as.numeric(do.call(paste0, df))

And replacement of NA's is very fast. In a test on a 3 column table with 300,000 rows on a MBP laptop...

df <- data.frame( a = sample(c(1:9,NA) , 3e5 , repl = TRUE ) , b = sample(c(1:9,NA) , 3e5 , repl = TRUE ) , c = sample(c(1:9,NA) , 3e5 , repl = TRUE )  )   
sum(is.na(df))
[1] 90118

system.time( (df[is.na(df)] <- 0 ) )
  user  system elapsed 
 0.250   0.021   0.269 
nrow(df)
 [1] 300000
share|improve this answer
    
SimonO101, as.numeric(do.call(paste0, df)) would be faster. apply converts the data.frame to a matrix. –  Arun Apr 23 '13 at 14:02
    
@Arun thank you for the tip. Want to edit it? Or if you write an answer I will just +1 you instead! :-) –  Simon O'Hanlon Apr 23 '13 at 14:03
    
@Arun can you also explain why I don't have to set collapse = "" in do.call but I do using the apply route? –  Simon O'Hanlon Apr 23 '13 at 14:05
    
Simon, can you put down how to replace NA's with 0's only in certain columns? For instance, in column 1-3 I need the NA's but in column 2-5 I need them replaced with 0. –  Mark Apr 23 '13 at 14:14
    
@SiminO101, iiuc, collapse is used when you pass in a single vector and want to stitch them together. ex: paste(1:5, collapse="."). sep is used when you've each element passed as a separate argument: ex: paste(1,2,3,4,5, sep="."). The do.call syntax basically does the latter but all columns together like: paste(df$X1, df$X2, sep="") is equivalent to do.call(paste0, df[,1:2]) –  Arun Apr 23 '13 at 14:14

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