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I have two similar methods. One of them prints something and one of them save somethings. As you can see there are a lot of duplicate code. How should I refactor it and remove this duplication ?

public static void printSomething(List<String> list) {
    for (String item : list) {
        if (item.contains("aaa")) {
            System.out.println("aaa" + item);
        }
        if (item.contains("bbb")) {
            System.out.println("bbb" + item);
        } else {
            System.out.println(item);
        }
    }
}

public static Map<String, String> getSomething(List<String> list) {
    Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();
    for (String item : list) {
        if (item.contains("aaa")) {
            map.put("aaa", item);
        }
        if (item.contains("bbb")) {
            map.put("bbb", item);
        } else {
            //do nothing
        }
    }
    return map;
}

UPDATE:

Code was updated to solve problem when method are not exactly similar

share|improve this question
    
It depends...why do you have these 2 methods... can you share the calling methods –  Frank Apr 23 '13 at 13:54
    
You could probably use the return value of getSomething() to do the printouts in printSomething(); I would go this way in order to avoid methods returning nothing (which are not setters ofc). –  adrianp Apr 23 '13 at 13:56
    
@HighPerformanceMark sorry for mistake. I mean duplication –  hudi Apr 23 '13 at 14:00
1  
That edit radically changed the problem, now you can't use the second method to implement the first anymore. –  Keppil Apr 23 '13 at 14:08
1  
@hudl: The problem is that you are invalidating answers to your previous question by making this change. You are better off asking a new question then. –  Keppil Apr 23 '13 at 14:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A generic Interface Action that have a method action(T t) can reduce the code.

public interface Action<E> {
        void action(E e);
}

Example:

public static void forEach(List<String> list, Action <String> action) {
    for(String s : list){
           action.action(s);

}

Now you just need 2 different implementations of Action.

You can use annonymous types if you don't want to create a class.

If you know c# this is similar to lambdas.

edit:

Using annonymous type:

public static Map<String, String> getSomething(List<String> list) {
    final Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();
    forEach(list, new Action<String>() {
        @Override
        public void action(String e) {
            if (e.contains("aaa")) {
                map.put("aaa", e);
            }
            if (e.contains("bbb")) {
                map.put("bbb", e);
            } else {
                // do nothing
            }
        }
    });
    return map;
}

Creating the class:

public static Map<String, String> getSomething2(List<String> list) {
    final Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<String, String>();
    forEach(list, new ListToMapAction(map));
    return map;
}


public class ListToMapAction implements Action<String> {

    Map<String, String> map;

    public ListToMapAction(Map<String, String> map) {
        this.map = map;
    }

    @Override
    public void action(String e) {
        if (e.contains("aaa")) {
            map.put("aaa", e);
        }
        if (e.contains("bbb")) {
            map.put("bbb", e);
        } else {
            // do nothing
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
sorry but I dont understand your example. Your method return nothing so how should I get my map ? –  hudi Apr 23 '13 at 14:23
    
edited with full implementation –  Tiago Almeida Apr 23 '13 at 15:20
    
when you just println something ? I think there will be still some duplication in method action –  hudi Apr 23 '13 at 15:26
    
yea it will be repeated :\ are the "aaa" and "bbb" elements in a list? If yes, you can compare both lists and the code will be shorter. –  Tiago Almeida Apr 23 '13 at 15:32

In a programming language with first-class functions, you'd pass around a function as a parameter indicating what you want to do inside the loop (for an example see the update, below). Java is going to have lambdas in version 8, but they're not quite up to the job.

In the current state of Java, you'll have to settle with something uglier - for example, passing an extra parameter to the method; or you could pass around anonymous inner classes that implement an interface, but IMHO that's even uglier than what I'm about to suggest:

static void printSomething(List<String> list, boolean print)

If print is true then print inside the loop, otherwise add to the Map. Of course, you'll have to add a couple of ifs inside the loop for checking this condition, and at the beginning, one extra if to determine if the Map is to be initialized. Either way, the method returns a Map, but the Map can be null for the printing case. This is what I mean:

static Map<String, String> processSomething(List<String> list, boolean print) {

    Map<String, String> map = null;
    if (!print)
        map = new HashMap<String, String>();

    for (String item : list) {
        if (item.contains("aaa")) {
            if (print)
                System.out.println("aaa" + item);
            else
                map.put("aaa", item);
        }
        if (item.contains("bbb")) {
            if (print)
                System.out.println("bbb" + item);
            else
                map.put("bbb", item);
        } else if (print) {
            System.out.println(item);
        }
    }

    return map;

}

UPDATE

For example, in Python - which allows passing functions as parameters, this is how you'd solve the problem in an elegant fashion:

def processSomething(lst, func):
    result = None
    for item in lst:
        if 'aaa' in item:
            result = func(item, 'aaa', result)
        elif 'bbb' in item:
            result = func(item, 'bbb', result)
        else:
            result = func(item, '', result)
    return result

def printer(item, key, result):
    print key + item

def mapper(item, key, result):
    if not result:
        result = {}
    if key:
        result[key] = item
    return result

See how it works:

processSomething(['aaa', 'bbb', 'ccc'], printer)
=> aaaaaa
   bbbbbb
   ccc

processSomething(['aaa', 'bbb', 'ccc'], mapper)
=> {'aaa': 'aaa', 'bbb': 'bbb'}
share|improve this answer
3  
this is very ugly example. First name of this method print or get ?? Second you still have void so you return nothing –  hudi Apr 23 '13 at 13:57
    
The name could be something generic. And the method has to return a Map always, even if it's null –  Óscar López Apr 23 '13 at 13:58
    
Good advice. And you could always pass in an implementation of an interface - the delegate pattern. –  Jasper Blues Apr 23 '13 at 14:00
1  
your example will definitely works but you must admit this isnt very nice example –  hudi Apr 23 '13 at 14:20
1  
hm function as parameter :) very nice. –  hudi Apr 23 '13 at 15:54

Assuming the order of which the println of "aaa" and "bbb" appear does not matter, you could replace the implementation of printSomething with

public static void printSomething(List<String> list) {
  Map<String, String> map = getSomething(list);
  for(Map.Entry<String, String> entry : map) {
    System.out.println(entry.getKey() + entry.getValue());
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. This is assuming the order of the printouts doesn't matter though. –  Keppil Apr 23 '13 at 14:00
    
Right - I meant to write that, thanks for pointing it out. –  tehlexx Apr 23 '13 at 14:02
    
hm thx this will works if the method will be the same but what if print will contains: ... else { System.out.println("bbb" + item); } and get ...else { //doNothing } –  hudi Apr 23 '13 at 14:05
    
This solution misses the case where item does not contain "aaa" or "bbb"; printSomething handles this case, but getSomething drops it (perhaps it changed when the question was edited). –  kuporific Apr 23 '13 at 14:49

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