Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

a Linux question: I have the CSV file data.csv with the following fields and values

KEY,LEVEL,DATA
2.456,2,aaa
2.456,1,zzz
0.867,2,bbb
9.775,4,ddd
0.867,1,ccc
2.456,0,ttt 
...

The field KEY is a float value, while LEVEL is an integer. I know that the first field can have repeated values, as well as the second one, but if you take them together you have a unique couple.

What I would like to do is to sort the file according to the column KEY and then for each unique value under KEY keep only the row having the higher value under LEVEL. Sorting is not a problem:

$> sort -t, -k1,2 data.csv  # fields: KEY,LEVEL,DATA
0.867,1,ccc
0.867,2,bbb
2.456,0,ttt
2.456,1,zzz
2.456,2,aaa
9.775,4,ddd
...

but then how can I filter the rows so that I get what I want, which is:

0.867,2,bbb
2.456,2,aaa
9.775,4,ddd
...

Is there a way to do it using command line tools like sort, uniq, awk and so on? Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

try this line:

your sort...|awk -F, 'k&&k!=$1{print p}{p=$0;k=$1}END{print p}'

output:

kent$  echo "0.867,1,bbb
0.867,2,ccc
2.456,0,ttt
2.456,1,zzz
2.456,2,aaa
9.775,4,ddd"|awk -F, 'k&&k!=$1{print p}{p=$0;k=$1}END{print p}'
0.867,2,ccc
2.456,2,aaa
9.775,4,ddd

The idea is, because your file is already sorted, just go through the file/input from top, if the first column (KEY) changed, print the last line, which is the highest value of LEVEL of last KEY

try with your real data, it should work.

also the whole logic (with your sort) could be done by awk in single process.

share|improve this answer
    
OK this worked out perfectly - and thanks for the explanation (so next time I can remember how to do), thanks! – csparpa Apr 23 '13 at 14:13

Use:

$> sort -r data.csv | uniq -w 5 | sort

given your floats are formatted "0.000"-"9.999"

share|improve this answer

Perl solution:

perl -aF, -ne '$h{$F[0]} = [@F[1,2]] if $F[1] > $h{$F[0]}[0]
               }{
               print join ",", $_, @{$h{$_}} for sort {$a<=>$b} keys %h' data.csv

Note that the result is different from the one you requested, the first line contains bbb, not ccc.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, it was a typo – csparpa Apr 23 '13 at 14:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.