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I'm pretty new to SQL and please bare with me while I explain this as it is quite hard to explain.

I have 3 tables:

Trip  Promotion  Promotion Cost.
  1 ---- M   1  --------- M

Sample data include:

TripID    TripName    Date
XYZ123     Hawaii    09/06/09
YTU574     Japan     09/09/09
GHR752     US        11/07/09


PromotionID    TripID    Name
1              XYZ123    Poster
2              XYZ123    Brochure
3              GHR752    TV ad

CostID    PromotionID   Cost
  1           1         $50
  2           1         $100
  3           1         $120
  4           3         $2000
  5           2         $500

I'm trying to build a query like this:

TripID     Number of Promotions     Total Cost
XYZ123             2                  $770
GHR752             1                  $2000

What I have is this:

SELECT
      Trip.TripID, Count(Trip.TripID) AS [Number Of Promotions], Sum(PromotionCost.Cost) AS SumOfCost
FROM
     Trip
     INNER JOIN
         (Promotion
          INNER JOIN
          PromotionCost ON Promotion.PromotionID = PromotionCost.PromotionID
         ) ON Trip.TripID = Promotion.TripID
GROUP BY
       Trip.TripID;

And it gives me something like this:

TripID     Number of Promotions     Total Cost
XYZ123             4                  $770
GHR752             1                  $2000

I'm not sure why the Number of Promotions is messed up like that for the first one (XYZ123). It seems that somehow the JOIN is affecting it because if I use this:

SELECT
      Trip.TripID, Count(Trip.TripID) AS [Number Of Promotions], 
FROM
      Trip
      INNER JOIN
      Promotion ON Trip.TripID = Promotion.TripID
GROUP BY
      Trip.TripID;

It gives me the right number of promotions which is just 2.

Any help?

share|improve this question

You can add up the cost for each promotion in a subquery. That way, you only get one row for each promotion, and COUNT works to calculate the number of promotions per trip. For example:

select 
    t.TripId
,   count(p.PromotionId) as [Number of Promotions]
,   sum(pc.PromotionCost) as [Total Cost]
from trip t
left join promotions p on p.TripId = t.TripId
left join (
    select 
        PromotionId
    ,   PromotionCost = sum(cost)
    from Promotions
    group by PromotionId
) pc on pc.PromotionId = p.PromotionId
group by t.TripId

In case MS Access does not allow subqueries, you can store the subquery in a view, and join on that.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, we have virtually the same coding style! I've never seen that before. Except, you indent w/ 4 spaces, where I prefer 2. – Peter Radocchia Oct 24 '09 at 17:02
2  
Jet/ACE supports derived table subqueries, but you can only use the standard () syntax if you're using the so-called SQL 93 mode. If you're using standard Jet/ACE SQL 89 mode, you have to use the weird dialect that uses square brackets, with the closing one requiring a period after it, e.g., "[SELECT * FROM MyTable]. As DerivedTable". This causes problems if your SQL string requires square brackets (because you were silly and named your fields with reserved words or included spaces or weird characters in the field names). – David-W-Fenton Oct 24 '09 at 20:52

You can try to compensate for the duplicate Promotion rows by using COUNT(DISTINCT):

SELECT Trip.TripID, Count(DISTINCT Promotion.PromotionID) AS [Number Of Promotions],
  Sum(PromotionCost.Cost) AS SumOfCost
FROM Trip INNER JOIN Promotion ON Trip.TripID = Promotion.TripID
INNER JOIN PromotionCost ON Promotion.PromotionID = PromotionCost.PromotionID
GROUP BY Trip.TripID;

What's going on is that by default, COUNT() counts the rows produced after all joins have been done. There are four promotion costs for TripID XYZ123, so four rows, even though the TripId occurs multiple times among those four rows.

It's easier to visualize if you try a similar query without the GROUP BY:

SELECT Trip.TripID, Promotion.PromotionID, PromotionCost.Cost
FROM Trip INNER JOIN Promotion ON Trip.TripID = Promotion.TripID
INNER JOIN PromotionCost ON Promotion.PromotionID = PromotionCost.PromotionID;

You'll see the four rows for XYZ123 (with duplicate PromotionID values), and one row for GHR752.


Re comments that MS Access doesn't support COUNT(DISTINCT): if that's the case, then you shouldn't do this in a single query. Do it in two queries:

SELECT Trip.TripID, SUM(PromotionCost.Cost) AS SumOfCost
FROM Trip INNER JOIN Promotion ON Trip.TripID = Promotion.TripID
INNER JOIN PromotionCost ON Promotion.PromotionID = PromotionCost.PromotionID
GROUP BY Trip.TripID;

SELECT Trip.TripID, Count(Promotion.PromotionID) AS [Number Of Promotions]
FROM Trip INNER JOIN Promotion ON Trip.TripID = Promotion.TripID
GROUP BY Trip.TripID;

The alternative is a very convoluted solution using subqueries, described in this article at Microsoft:

http://blogs.msdn.com/access/archive/2007/09/19/writing-a-count-distinct-query-in-access.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Can you SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT) in ms access? – Adriaan Stander Oct 24 '09 at 7:19
    
this gives a Syntax Error (missing operator) in query expression 'Count(DISTINCT Promotion.PromotionID)' – Jordan M. Oct 24 '09 at 7:28
    
No COUNT(DISTINCT) in ms access – Adriaan Stander Oct 24 '09 at 7:29
    
I'll look into the article tomorrow. This has to be done in one query so I guess I have no choice for now. Thanks! – Jordan M. Oct 24 '09 at 7:50
    
I wish people would not bother posting answers that don't work in the environment that is clearly declared in the original question. COUNT(DISTINCT) does not exist in Access/Jet/ACE so no one should be posting an answer dependent on it. If you don't have Access to check with and don't use Access regularly, you really shouldn't be posting an answer. -1 – David-W-Fenton Oct 24 '09 at 20:53

Not the answer to your question but a useful recommendation (I hope): convert your query into a view by using the visual designer of SQL Server Management Studio, and examine the generated SQL code. You don't have to actually keep and use the generated view, but it is a good way of learning by example. I do that whenever I'm struggled with a complex query.

EDIT. Shame on me, I hand't read the tags: the question is MS-Access related, not SQL Server related. Anyway I think that my advice is still valid as far as concept-learning is the concern, since the SQL syntax is similar.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I'm really new at this but how do I go about doing that? – Jordan M. Oct 24 '09 at 7:02
    
You need to install SQL Server Express (make sure you install SQL Server Management Studio as well), then create a new database, create the tables you need, and finally create the view. Take a look here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb934498.aspx – Konamiman Oct 24 '09 at 7:05

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