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Im creating a Login using a window control to allow a user to login into a WPF application that I am creating.

So far, I have created a method that checks whether the user has entered in the correct credentials for the username and password in a textbox on the login screen, binding two properties.

I have achieved this by creating a bool method, like so;

 public bool CheckLogin()
 {
        var user = context.Users.Where(i => i.Username == this.Username).SingleOrDefault();

        if (user == null)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Unable to Login, incorrect credentials.");
            return false;
        }
        else if (this.Username == user.Username || this.Password.ToString() == user.Password)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Welcome "+ user.Username + ", you have successfully logged in.");

            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Unable to Login, incorrect credentials.");
            return false;
        }
 }

 public ICommand ShowLoginCommand
 {
     get
     {
         if (this.showLoginCommand == null)
         {
             this.showLoginCommand = new RelayCommand(this.LoginExecute, null);
         }
         return this.showLoginCommand;
     }
 }

 private void LoginExecute()
 {
      this.CheckLogin();
 } 

I also have a command that I bind to my button within the xaml like so;

<Button Name="btnLogin" IsDefault="True" Content="Login" Command="{Binding ShowLoginCommand}" />

When I enter in the username and password it executes the appropriated code, whether it being right, or wrong. But how can I close this window from the ViewModel when both username and password are correct?

I have previously tried using a dialog modal but it didn't quite work out. Furthermore, within my app.xaml, I have done something like the following, which loads the login page first, then once true, loads the actual application.

 private void ApplicationStart(object sender, StartupEventArgs e)
    {
        Current.ShutdownMode = ShutdownMode.OnExplicitShutdown;

        var dialog = new UserView();

        if (dialog.ShowDialog() == true)
        {
            var mainWindow = new MainWindow();
            Current.ShutdownMode = ShutdownMode.OnMainWindowClose;
            Current.MainWindow = mainWindow;
            mainWindow.Show();
        }
        else
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Unable to load application.", "Error", MessageBoxButton.OK);
            Current.Shutdown(-1);
        }
    }

So, following onto my question - How can I close the Login Window control from the ViewModel?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of WPF MVVM Newbie - how should the ViewModel close the form? –  poke Apr 23 '13 at 14:51

8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You can simply pass the window to your ViewModel using the CommandParameter. See my Example below:

I've implemented an CloseWindow Method which takes a Windows as parameter and close it. The window is passed to the ViewModel via CommandParameter. Note that you need to define an x:Name for the window which should be close. In my XAML Window i call this method via Command and pass the window itself as a parameter to the ViewModel using CommandParameter.

Command="{Binding CloseWindowCommand, Mode=OneWay}" 
CommandParameter="{Binding ElementName=TestWindow}"

It is a clean and easy solution which is in compliance with the MVVM programming paradigm.

ViewModel

public RelayCommand<Window> CloseWindowCommand { get; private set; }

public MainViewModel()
{
    this.CloseWindowCommand = new RelayCommand<Window>(this.CloseWindow);
}

private void CloseWindow(Window window)
{
    if (window != null)
    {
       window.Close();
    }
}

XAML

<Window x:Class="ClientLibTestTool.ErrorView"
        x:Name="TestWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:localization="clr-namespace:ClientLibTestTool.ViewLanguages"
        DataContext="{Binding Main, Source={StaticResource Locator}}"
        Title="{x:Static localization:localization.HeaderErrorView}" Height="600" Width="800" ResizeMode="NoResize" WindowStartupLocation="CenterScreen">
    <Grid> 
        <Button Content="{x:Static localization:localization.ButtonClose}" 
                Height="30" 
                Width="100" 
                Margin="0,0,10,10" 
                IsCancel="True" 
                VerticalAlignment="Bottom" 
                HorizontalAlignment="Right" 
                Command="{Binding CloseWindowCommand, Mode=OneWay}" 
                CommandParameter="{Binding ElementName=TestWindow}"/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

Note that i'm using the MVVM light framework, but the principal is the same for every wpf application.

EDIT:

Your Login Button (Added CommandParameter):

<Button Name="btnLogin" IsDefault="True" Content="Login" Command="{Binding ShowLoginCommand}" CommandParameter="{Binding ElementName=LoginWindow}"/>

Your code:

 public RelayCommand<Window> CloseWindowCommand { get; private set; } // the <Window> is important for your solution!

 public MainViewModel() 
 {
     //initialize the CloseWindowCommand. Again, mind the <Window>
     //you don't have to do this in your constructor but it is good practice, thought
     this.CloseWindowCommand = new RelayCommand<Window>(this.CloseWindow);
 }

 public bool CheckLogin(Window loginWindow) //Added loginWindow Parameter
 {
    var user = context.Users.Where(i => i.Username == this.Username).SingleOrDefault();

    if (user == null)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Unable to Login, incorrect credentials.");
        return false;
    }
    else if (this.Username == user.Username || this.Password.ToString() == user.Password)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Welcome "+ user.Username + ", you have successfully logged in.");
        this.CloseWindow(loginWindow); //Added call to CloseWindow Method
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Unable to Login, incorrect credentials.");
        return false;
    }
 }

 //Added CloseWindow Method
 private void CloseWindow(Window window)
 {
     if (window != null)
     {
         window.Close();
     }
 }

EDIT2: For those of interest: VS2010 Demoproject(Warning: Quick and Dirty)

share|improve this answer
    
how would I use my current LoginCommand() in conjuction with the one you provided? –  WPFNoob Apr 24 '13 at 15:04
    
pass the window to your LoginCommand method and call the CloseWindow Method out of the LoginCommand() Method if the conditions are fulfilled –  Joel Apr 24 '13 at 15:07
    
see my updated post –  Joel Apr 24 '13 at 15:14
    
Thanks for the update @Joel. One last question, due to the method taking in a parameter of Window, and when I call that method within my command, it expects a parameter, would I create a local Window parameter that is called for the method, eg; private void LoginExecute(){this.CheckLogin();} <- CheckLogin needs to take in a paramter. –  WPFNoob Apr 24 '13 at 15:30
1  
If you don't like naming your windows, you can also bind the parameter like this: CommandParameter="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type Window}}}" –  Jacco Dieleman Apr 29 at 20:06

I usually put an event on the view model when I need to do this and then hook it up to the Window.Close() when binding the view model to the window

public class LoginViewModel
{
    public event EventHandler OnRequestClose;

    private void Login()
    {
        // Login logic here
        OnRequestClose(this, new EventArgs());
    }
}

And when creating the login window

var vm = new LoginViewModel();
var loginWindow = new LoginWindow
{
    DataContext = vm
};
vm.OnRequestClose += (s, e) => loginWindow.Close();

loginWindow.ShowDialog(); 
share|improve this answer
6  
Anonymous delegate is quickly written, but worth noting that the event cannot be unregistered (which may or may not be an issue). Usually better off with a full-fledged event handler. –  retailcoder Apr 23 '13 at 15:43

Well here is something I used in several projects. It may look like a hack, but it works fine.

public class AttachedProperties : DependencyObject //adds a bindable DialogResult to window
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty DialogResultProperty = 
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("DialogResult", typeof(bool?), typeof(AttachedProperties), 
        new PropertyMetaData(default(bool?), OnDialogResultChanged));

    public bool? DialogResult
    {
        get { return (bool?)GetValue(DialogResultProperty); }
        set { SetValue(DialogResultProperty, value); }
    }

    private static void OnDialogResultChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var window = d as Window;
        if (window == null)
            return;

        window.DialogResult = (bool?)e.NewValue;
    }
}

Now you can bind DialogResult to a VM and set its value of a property. The Window will close, when the value is set.

<!-- Assuming that the VM is bound to the DataContext and the bound VM has a property DialogResult -->
<Window someNs:AttachedProperties.DialogResult={Binding DialogResult} />

This is an abstract of what's running in our production environment

<Window x:Class="AC.Frontend.Controls.DialogControl.Dialog"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:DialogControl="clr-namespace:AC.Frontend.Controls.DialogControl" 
        xmlns:hlp="clr-namespace:AC.Frontend.Helper"
        MinHeight="150" MinWidth="300" ResizeMode="NoResize" SizeToContent="WidthAndHeight"
        WindowStartupLocation="CenterScreen" Title="{Binding Title}"
        hlp:AttachedProperties.DialogResult="{Binding DialogResult}" WindowStyle="ToolWindow" ShowInTaskbar="True"
        Language="{Binding UiCulture, Source={StaticResource Strings}}">
        <!-- A lot more stuff here -->
</Window>

As you can see, I'm declaring the namespace xmlns:hlp="clr-namespace:AC.Frontend.Helper" first and afterwards the binding hlp:AttachedProperties.DialogResult="{Binding DialogResult}".

The AttachedProperty looks like this. It's not the same I posted yesterday, but IMHO it shouldn't have any effect.

public class AttachedProperties
{
    #region DialogResult

    public static readonly DependencyProperty DialogResultProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("DialogResult", typeof (bool?), typeof (AttachedProperties), new PropertyMetadata(default(bool?), OnDialogResultChanged));

    private static void OnDialogResultChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var wnd = d as Window;
        if (wnd == null)
            return;

        wnd.DialogResult = (bool?) e.NewValue;
    }

    public static bool? GetDialogResult(DependencyObject dp)
    {
        if (dp == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("dp");

        return (bool?)dp.GetValue(DialogResultProperty);
    }

    public static void SetDialogResult(DependencyObject dp, object value)
    {
        if (dp == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("dp");

        dp.SetValue(DialogResultProperty, value);
    }

    #endregion
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I wrote as I recalled it. I corrected the code. –  DHN Apr 23 '13 at 15:19
    
Thanks, I was just about to mention that! :) –  WPFNoob Apr 23 '13 at 15:19
    
No, it's not a silly question. Just put the declaration of the binding in the <Window /> element as I illustrated in my snipped. I was just too lazy to write the rest (namespace declarations etc), which is usually also declared there. –  DHN Apr 23 '13 at 15:29
1  
Pls refer to my edit. I posted production code, so I'm sure that it's working. It looks a bit different, but the code I posted yesterday should also work. –  DHN Apr 24 '13 at 8:11
1  
Well that's the part, I'm leaving to you. ;o) Think about the DataContext of the Dialog. I would expect, that the VM set as DataContext provides a command, which sets the property DialogResult or whatever you've bound to true or false, so that the Dialog closes. –  DHN Apr 24 '13 at 9:54

Staying MVVM, I think using either Behaviors from the Blend SDK (System.Windows.Interactivity) or a custom interaction request from Prism could work really well for this sort of situation.

If going the Behavior route, here's the general idea:

public class CloseWindowBehavior : Behavior<Window>
{
    public bool CloseTrigger
    {
        get { return (bool)GetValue(CloseTriggerProperty); }
        set { SetValue(CloseTriggerProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty CloseTriggerProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("CloseTrigger", typeof(bool), typeof(CloseWindowBehavior), new PropertyMetadata(false, OnCloseTriggerChanged));

    private static void OnCloseTriggerChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var behavior = d as CloseWindowBehavior;

        if (behavior != null)
        {
            behavior.OnCloseTriggerChanged();
        }
    }

    private void OnCloseTriggerChanged()
    {
        // when closetrigger is true, close the window
        if (this.CloseTrigger)
        {
            this.AssociatedObject.Close();
        }
    }
}

Then in your window, you would just bind the CloseTrigger to a boolean value that would be set when you wanted the window to close.

<Window x:Class="TestApp.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:i="clr-namespace:System.Windows.Interactivity;assembly=System.Windows.Interactivity"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:TestApp"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <i:Interaction.Behaviors>
        <local:CloseWindowBehavior CloseTrigger="{Binding CloseTrigger}" />
    </i:Interaction.Behaviors>

    <Grid>

    </Grid>
</Window>

Finally, your DataContext/ViewModel would have a property that you'd set when you wanted the window to close like this:

public class MainWindowViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private bool closeTrigger;

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or Sets if the main window should be closed
    /// </summary>
    public bool CloseTrigger
    {
        get { return this.closeTrigger; }
        set
        {
            this.closeTrigger = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("CloseTrigger");
        }
    }

    public MainWindowViewModel()
    {
        // just setting for example, close the window
        CloseTrigger = true;
    }

    protected void RaisePropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
}

(set your Window.DataContext = new MainWindowViewModel())

share|improve this answer
    
Also a nice solution... –  DHN Apr 24 '13 at 3:50
    
Thanks for the reply @Steve, you mentioned about binding the CloseTrigger to a boolean value. When you said that, did you mean for me to create a DataTrigger to achieve it? –  WPFNoob Apr 24 '13 at 7:59
    
Sorry, I should have been more explicit--I'd have a property on my viewmodel (in the above example, one called CloseTrigger) that would get set to true, which would end up triggering the behavior. I Updated the answer –  Steve Van Treeck Apr 24 '13 at 13:50
    
This worked, but I had to change the way my application loaded. Because I was using a Window for my main application, it killed all the child windows aswell. Thanks. –  WPFNoob Apr 25 '13 at 9:31

It's simple. You can create your own ViewModel class for Login - LoginViewModel. You can create view var dialog = new UserView(); inside your LoginViewModel. And you can set-up Command LoginCommand into button.

<Button Name="btnLogin" IsDefault="True" Content="Login" Command="{Binding LoginCommand}" />

and

<Button Name="btnCancel" IsDefault="True" Content="Login" Command="{Binding CancelCommand}" />

ViewModel class:

public class LoginViewModel
{
    Window dialog;
    public bool ShowLogin()
    {
       dialog = new UserView();
       dialog.DataContext = this; // set up ViewModel into View
       if (dialog.ShowDialog() == true)
       {
         return true;
       }

       return false;
    }

    ICommand _loginCommand
    public ICommand LoginCommand
    {
        get
        {
            if (_loginCommand == null)
                _loginCommand = new RelayCommand(param => this.Login());

            return _loginCommand;
        }
    }

    public void CloseLoginView()
    {
            if (dialog != null)
          dialog.Close();
    }   

    public void Login()
    {
        if(CheckLogin()==true)
        {
            CloseLoginView();         
        }
        else
        {
          // write error message
        }
    }

    public bool CheckLogin()
    {
      // ... check login code
      return true;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Yes, it's also a valid solution. But if you want to stick to MVVM and the decoupling of VMs and views, you're going to break the pattern. –  DHN Apr 23 '13 at 15:21
    
Hi @misak - having trying to implement your solution(like the other answers), it throws a Object reference not set to an instance of an object. for the CloseLoginView method. Any suggestions how to solve that issue? –  WPFNoob Apr 24 '13 at 10:35
    
@WPFNoob - I tray this solution again. Example works correctly. Do you want to send complete visual studio solution on email? –  misak May 3 '13 at 8:44
    
@WPFNoob - I see the problem. You are creating instance as var dialog = new UserView();. Clear keyword var (local instance) overwrites global instance in LoginViewModel –  misak May 3 '13 at 8:52

You can close the current window just by using the following code:

Application.Current.Windows[0].Close();
share|improve this answer

System.Environment.Exit(0); in view model would work.

share|improve this answer
    
No It wont. It will exit the application, and not close the current window. –  Tilak Jun 26 at 17:11

This is a way I did it pretty simply:

YourWindow.xaml.cs

//In your constructor
public YourWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    DataContext = new YourWindowViewModel(this);
}

YourWindowViewModel.cs

private YourWindow window;//so we can kill the window

//In your constructor
public YourWindowViewModel(YourWindow window)
{
    this.window = window;
}

//to close the window
public void CloseWindow()
{
    window.Close();
}

I don't see anything wrong with the answer you chose, I just thought this might be a more simple way to do it!

share|improve this answer

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