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Im not very good wit JS and I just dont get why this wont work! The code uses jquery to apply the pulsate efect to one of my divs and run forever unless I stop it with another function, but I cannot figure our why my first piece of code wont run!

function animate(var x){
    // Do pulsate animation
    $(x).effect("pulsate", { times:4 }, 5000);
    // set timeout and recall after 10secs
    setTimeout(animate, 10000);
}
  $(document).ready(animate("#mydiv"));

Only way to get it working is for me to do this

function animate(){
    // Do pulsate animation
    $("#mydiv").effect("pulsate", { times:4 }, 5000);
    // set timeout and recall after 10secs
    setTimeout(animate, 10000);
}
  $(document).ready(animate);

Note that in the first snippet the code uses variables to be more useful and the second piece has the selectors name hardcoded

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your code has two issues:

omit the var:

function animate(x){

modify your event handler:

$(document).ready(function(){
   animate("#mydiv");
});

You need to hand over a function reference (either animate or function(){}), not run the code right away which you are doing if you pass animate().

Now to not lose the reference to your x you have to modify the animate call in the timeout too:

setTimeout(function () {
        animate(x);
    }, 10000);
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Oooooooh so I need to pass a reference always then. Cool thx a lot! –  Termiux Apr 23 '13 at 15:16
    
@Termiux sure, this is a callback. If you do not pass it ad reference, you are executing your callback right away and pass the returnvalue of it to the DOMready. –  Christoph Apr 23 '13 at 15:17
1  
@Christoph: Would $(document).ready(animate.bind(this, "#mydiv")); work? –  François Wahl Apr 23 '13 at 15:18
    
@FrançoisWahl No, that sets the value of this in the animate function. So technically, it could work if the function started using this instead of x. –  Ian Apr 23 '13 at 15:20
    
@Ian: Sorry, I noticed that and updated the comment to pass this, argument instead. Would that work? –  François Wahl Apr 23 '13 at 15:20
show 8 more comments

Don't use var in your function declaration. Just use:

function animate(x){

Also, you probably want something like this for your first example:

function animate(x){
    return function () {
        function animateInner() {
            $(x).effect("pulsate", { times:4 }, 5000);
            setTimeout(animateInner, 10000);
        }
        animateInner();
    };
}
$(document).ready(animate("#mydiv"));

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/XHKbC/

Otherwise, the original animate("#mydiv") call executes immediately (and $(x) probably won't find anything since the DOM isn't ready yet). $(document).ready() expects a reference to a function. You called a function instead. But that's all a little overkill. Just use:

$(document).ready(function () {
    animate("#mydiv");
});

but you'll have to change your function so the setTimeout passes the value of x as well:

function animate(x){
    // Do pulsate animation
    $(x).effect("pulsate", { times:4 }, 5000);
    // set timeout and recall after 10secs
    setTimeout(function () {
        animate(x);
    }, 10000);
}

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/XHKbC/2/

Although it's a little more code/complex, my first example doesn't suffer the problem in my second (having to pass x in the setTimeout) by using a closure.

UPDATE:

Being shown how you are using this code, I'd set it up like this:

function Animater(target) {
    var self = this;
    var animateTO;
    var animateElement = target;

    function animate() {
        animateElement.effect("pulsate", { times:4 }, 5000);
        animateTO = setTimeout(animate, 10000);
    }

    self.start = function () {
        animate();
    };

    self.stop = function () {
        animateElement.finish();
        clearTimeout(animateTO);
    };
}

And create a new one like:

var mydivAnimater = new Animater($("#mydiv"));

You can then call .start() and .stop() on it, and you create any number of these Animater objects on different elements as you want.

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/K7bQC/3/

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Hehe, you wanna beat me hard, do you? ^_^ –  Christoph Apr 23 '13 at 15:19
    
@Christoph Haha I'm not trying to go against you. The first thing I noticed was the var, so I posted. Then I realized the function was messy in the first place, so I tried to refactor, and did too much, so I just wanted to include the options I thought of :) –  Ian Apr 23 '13 at 15:20
    
+1 great answer. Explanations and Demos are always usefull to future users looking for similar solutions. –  François Wahl Apr 23 '13 at 15:25
    
Thx both of u guys –  Termiux Apr 23 '13 at 15:27
    
@FrançoisWahl Thank you very much, that's what I look to do :) –  Ian Apr 23 '13 at 15:35
show 3 more comments

You dont need to type var when specifying a function parameter.

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