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Where do I get the trailing 0 or 9 from ? I checked at each step that no rounding issues appear and I got the correct results. However, when I add this numbers to the graph, rounding problems arise.

My full code is the following:

from __future__ import division
from math import sqrt
import networkx as nx
import numpy as np
from decimal import Decimal

n=4   #n is the nummber of steps in the graph.
a = np.array([ 1.1656,  1.0125,  0.8594])

g=nx.DiGraph() #I initiate the graph

#f2 checks for equal nodes and removes them
def f2(seq): 
    checked = []
    for e in seq:
        if (e not in checked):
            checked.append(e)
    return np.asarray(checked)

root = np.array([1])
existing_nodes = np.array([1])
previous_step_nodes = np.array([1])
nodes_to_add =np.empty(0)
clean = np.array([1])

for step in range(1,n):
    nodes_to_add=np.empty(0)
    for values in previous_step_nodes:
        nodes_to_add = np.append(nodes_to_add,values*a)

    print "--------"
    print "*****nodes to add ****" + str(f2(np.round(nodes_to_add,4)))
    print "clean = " + str(clean) + "\n"
    #Up to here, the code generates the nodes I will need 

    # This for loop makes the edges and adds the nodes.
    for node in clean:
        for next_node in np.round(node*a,4):
            print str(node ) + "     "  + str( next_node)
            g.add_edge(np.round(node,4), np.round(next_node,4))
#            g.add_edge(Decimal(np.round(node,4)).quantize(Decimal('1.0000')), Decimal(np.round(next_node,4)).quantize(Decimal('1.0000')))

    previous_step_nodes = f2(nodes_to_add)
    clean = f2(np.round(previous_step_nodes,4))
#    g.add_nodes_from(clean)

    print "\n step" + str(step) + " \n"
    print " Current Step :" + "Number of nodes = " + str(len(f2(np.round(previous_step_nodes,4))))
    print clean

print "How many nodes are there ? " +str(len(g.nodes()))

This code works and prints out a very neat description of the graph, which is exactly what I want. However, when I print the list of nodes, to check that the graph cointains only the number of nodes that I need to have, I get:

How many nodes are there ? 22
[1, 0.88109999999999999, 1.0143, 1.038, 0.74780000000000002, 
1.1801999999999999, 1.3755999999999999, 1.0142, 0.8609, 
0.88100000000000001, 0.85940000000000005, 1.1656,
1.1950000000000001, 1.0125, 1.5835999999999999, 1.0017, 
0.87009999999999998, 1.1676,
0.63480000000000003, 0.73860000000000003, 1.3586, 1.0251999999999999]

This is clearly a problem which is making my program useless. 0.88109999999999999 and 0.88100000000000001 are the same node.

So after checking stackoverflow for days, I came up with the conclusion that the only way around the problem was to use Decimal(). So, I replaced :

g.add_edge(np.round(node,4), np.round(next_node,4))

with

g.add_edge(Decimal(np.round(node,4)).quantize(Decimal('1.0000')), 
           Decimal(np.round(next_node,4)).quantize(Decimal('1.0000')))

However, the result was not what I expected: because

0.88109999999999999 = 0.8811
0.88100000000000001 =0.8810, 

so Python still thinks of them as different numbers.

Ideally, I would prefer to not complicate the code using Decimal() and would like to cut off the decimals so that 0.88109999999999999 = 0.88100000000000001 = 0.8810 but I have no clue how to solve this problem.

Thanks to your replies, I have updated my code. I took the suggestion to use f2 as:

def f2(seq): 
    near_equal = lambda x, y: abs(x - y) < 1.e-5
    checked = []
    for e in seq:
        if all([not near_equal(e, x) for x in checked]):
            checked.append(e)
    return np.asarray(checked)

and I deleted all the numpy.round() because if I can remove nodes that are "similar" then I don't need any rounding at all.

However, python still cannot distinguish the nodes:

g.nodes() prints out 23 nodes, when there should only be 20: (Note: I tried it while changing the tolerance level 1.e-5, but did not get something different)

How many nodes are there ? 23

[0.63474091729864457, 0.73858020442900385, 0.74781245698436638,
 0.85940689107605128, 0.86088399667008808, 0.86088399667008819,
 0.87014947721450187, 0.88102634567968308, 0.88102634567968319,
 1, 1.00171875, 1.0125, 1.0142402343749999, 1.02515625,
 1.0379707031249998, 1.1655931089239486, 1.1675964720799117,
 1.180163022785498, 1.1949150605703167, 1.358607295570996,
 1.3755898867656333, 1.3755898867656335, 1.5835833014513552]

This is because: 0.86088399667008808, 0.86088399667008819; 0.88102634567968308, 0.88102634567968319 and 1.3755898867656333, 1.3755898867656335 are still being treated as different nodes.

Full code:

from __future__ import division
from math import sqrt
import networkx as nx
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

mu1 = 0.05; sigma1= 0.25
n=4

a0=1
a1 = 1 + mu1/n + sigma1*sqrt(3)/sqrt(2*n)
a2 = 1 + mu1/n
a3 = 1 + mu1 /n - sigma1*sqrt(3)/sqrt(2*n)
a = np.array([a1,a2,a3])

print " a = " + str(a)

g=nx.DiGraph() #I initiate the graph

def f2(seq): 
    near_equal = lambda x, y: abs(x - y) < 1.e-5
    checked = []
    for e in seq:
        if all([not near_equal(e, x) for x in checked]):
            checked.append(e)
    return np.asarray(checked)

root = np.array([1])
existing_nodes = np.array([1])
previous_step_nodes = np.array([1])
nodes_to_add =np.empty(0)
clean = np.array([1])

print "________________This Makes the Nodes____________________________________"
for step in range(1,n):
    nodes_to_add=np.empty(0)
    for values in previous_step_nodes:
        nodes_to_add = np.append(nodes_to_add,values*a)
    print "--------"    
    print "*****nodes to add ****" + str(f2(nodes_to_add))
    print "clean = " + str(clean) + "\n"
    #Up to here, the code generates the nodes I will need 

    # This for loop makes the edges and adds the nodes.
    for node in clean:
        for next_node in node*a:
            print str(node ) + "     "  + str( next_node)
            g.add_edge(node, next_node)

    previous_step_nodes = f2(nodes_to_add)
    clean = f2(previous_step_nodes)
#    g.add_nodes_from(clean)

    print "\n step" + str(step) + " \n"
    print " Current Step :" + "Number of nodes = " + str(len(f2(previous_step_nodes)))
    print clean

print "______________End of the Nodes_________________________________"
print "How many nodes are there ? " +str(len(g.nodes()))
print sorted(g.nodes())

Result:

How many nodes are there ? 23 [0.63474091729864457, 0.73858020442900385, 0.74781245698436638, 0.85940689107605128, 0.86088399667008808, 0.86088399667008819, 0.87014947721450187, 0.88102634567968308, 0.88102634567968319, 1, 1.00171875, 1.0125, 1.0142402343749999, 1.02515625, 1.0379707031249998, 1.1655931089239486, 1.1675964720799117, 1.180163022785498, 1.1949150605703167, 1.358607295570996, 1.3755898867656333, 1.3755898867656335, 1.5835833014513552]

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is usually not a good idea to depend on exact equality between floating point numbers because the same set of inputs used to generate the numbers can produce different result due to differing floating point representations, order of mathematical operations, etc.

Unless you are dealing with extremely close nodes, you can modify your f2 function with something like the following (you may want to make the tolerance a variable):

def f2(seq): 
    near_equal = lambda x, y: abs(x - y) < 1.e-8
    checked = []
    for e in seq:
        if all([not near_equal(e, x) for x in checked]):
            checked.append(e)
    return np.asarray(checked)

Note that if the floating point numbers were exactly equal, an easier way to get a list with duplicates removed would be

nodes_without_dupes = list(set(nodes_to_add)) 
share|improve this answer
    
I'm confused. I took your suggestion and changed my f2 function. Adding your f2 doesn't seem to change anything. My program still treats those nodes as different. I varied the tolerance to be sure the problem wasn't there. –  Miguel Herschberg Apr 23 '13 at 17:12
    
On top of that, I deleted all the numpy.round() because from what I understood, if f2 removes "similar" nodes, then there is no point rounding the values. right? However, I still get the same solution as before. –  Miguel Herschberg Apr 23 '13 at 17:14
    
Yes, the round calls should be removed. It is hard to say what is happening because I don't see the modified version of the code you are running but when I apply the f2 I suggested (as copied from your code above) to the list of 23 items, it returns 20 items, as expected. Did you remove all the calls to round? –  bogatron Apr 23 '13 at 17:36
    
I posted the full code. Am I crazy? I still get 23 nodes. Thank you sooo much! –  Miguel Herschberg Apr 23 '13 at 17:53
    
Again, the f2 function works so I think your original question is answered. It looks like you are dealing with another issue here. It may be due to the fact that the first value of clean (in your first iteration) is being set independently of nodes_to_add and those values are being added to g without being filtered first. –  bogatron Apr 23 '13 at 18:04

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