Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have two classes which have almost identical methods both called myMethod(), however, myChild2::myMethod() has a single extra line of code in it which uses a local variable. I would rather not duplicate the code in both child classes. I suppose I could move myMethod to myParent, and then add an if statement to detect which child class is calling the method, but I am guessing this is not right. What is the cleanest way to do this? Thank you

class myParent
{
    //code...
}

class myChild1 extends myParent
{
    public function myMethod()
    {
        // A bunch of code common to both myChild1::myMethod() and myChild2::myMethod() goes here
        // A bunch more code common to both myChild1::myMethod() and myChild2::myMethod() goes here
    }
}

class myChild2 extends myParent
{
    public function myMethod()
    {
        // A bunch of code common to both myChild1::myMethod() and myChild2::myMethod() goes here
        someOtherLineOfCode($someLocalVariable); // A single unique line of code goes here which uses a local variable
        // A bunch more code common to both myChild1::myMethod() and myChild2::myMethod() goes here
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a few options to accomplish your goal. The one you choose will depend on the purpose of the unique line.

Override the Method

First, you can myMethod() in the parent, then override it in myChild2(), including the extra line and then calling the parent. This will work if the extra line of code can be executed independently from the rest of myMethod():

class myChild2 extends myParent
{
     public function myMethod()
     {
          someOtherLineOfCode($someLocalVariable);
          parent::myMethod();
      }
}

Pass a flag parameter

If the order of execution is important, you can detect the need for the extra functionality at runtime:

class Parent
{
     function myMethod($enableExtraFunctionality=false)
     {
          // Common stuff
          if ($enableExtraFunctionality) 
          {
               someOtherLineOfCode($someLocalVariable);
          }
          // More common stuff
      }
 }

then set the variable to be true only in myChild2():

 class myChild2 extends Parent
 {
     function myMethod()
     {
          parent::myMethod(true);
     }
  }

If you wish, you can also pass that flag as a class variable instead of as a function parameter.

Detect the calling class's name

As a variation on the previous method, you can detect the child's class name. Check the comments in the get_class() PHP manual page for details.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Looks like no totally clean solutions. As a forth option, see schlimpf's suggestion. – user1032531 Apr 23 '13 at 16:36
    
Method 1 will not work (for my application) since it cannot executed independently from the rest of myMethod(). Would you recommend passing a flag or detecting the class name? – user1032531 Apr 23 '13 at 16:40
    
Detecting the calling class name will require fewer lines of code because you don't have to override myMethod(), but makes the parent dependent on the existence of a specifically-named child. If it were my code and I was forced to choose between the two, I would go with the flag option. – George Cummins Apr 23 '13 at 16:44
    
I agree, and will use the flag option. Think I should make the flag some private property of the child? – user1032531 Apr 23 '13 at 16:50
    
I don't think I would make it a property. It is only going to be used once and the value is always going to be true. A comment in the myChild2::myMethod() function should be sufficient. – George Cummins Apr 23 '13 at 16:53

You could do it like this:

class myParent
{
    public function myMethod()
    {
        // A bunch of code common to both myChild1::myMethod() and myChild2::myMethod()     goes here
        $this->templateMethod($someLocalVariable);
        // A bunch more code common to both myChild1::myMethod() and     myChild2::myMethod() goes here
    }

    protected function templateMethod($x) {}
}


class myChild2 extends myParent
{
    protected function templateMethod($x) {
        // some extra line
    }
}

Depends on what youre exactly doing, I think this is a clean solution

share|improve this answer
    
I also thought of doing this, but wasn't sure whether it was more intuitive as a IF statement. – user1032531 Apr 23 '13 at 16:37
    
Wouldn't this require an explicit myChild::templateMethod() call on the instance variable? As is, myParent::myMethod() will execute the call to templateMethod() without $someLocalVariable being populated. – George Cummins Apr 23 '13 at 16:41

I would say move it to myParent and add a constructor parameter. Depends a bit on what someOtherLineOfCode is, but you could at least just add a flag to determine whether or not to execute it, like so:

class myParent
{
    public function __construct($shouldExecute) {
        $this->$executeSomeOtherCode = $shouldExecute;
    }

    public function myMethod()
    {
        // A bunch of code common to both myChild1::myMethod() and myChild2::myMethod() goes here

        if($this->$executeSomeOtherCode) {
            someOtherLineOfCode($someLocalVariable); // A single unique line of code goes here which uses a local variable
        }

        // A bunch more code common to both myChild1::myMethod() and myChild2::myMethod() goes here
    }

    //code...
}

class myChild1 extends myParent
{
    public function __construct()(
        parent::__construct(FALSE);
        // Do stuff specific for Bar
    }

    // Other code
}

class myChild2 extends myParent
{
    public function __construct()(
        parent::__construct(TRUE);
        // Do stuff specific for Bar
    }

    // Other code
}
share|improve this answer
    
Novel approach, but probably a little more complicated than I ideally want. – user1032531 Apr 23 '13 at 16:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.