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I wrote some code which allows me to disable/enable checkboxes when I right-click them. It works in IE but not in Chrome or Firefox.

rightClickFunc: function (e) 
{
    var obj;
    if ($.browser.msie) obj = event.srcElement;
    else obj = e.target;
    stuff.disableEnableObject(obj);
    return false;
},

disableEnableObject: function (o)
{
    if (o.getAttribute("disabled") == null)                
          $('#'+o.id).attr("disabled", "disabled");
    else  $('#'+o.id).removeAttr("disabled");
}

How can I get the same functionality in Chrome as IE? The problem seems to be that right clicking on a disabled item in chrome does open the context menu (right click menu).

I made a sample of the code - see http://jsfiddle.net/e72M6/. Run it in IE and chrome to see the difference. (IE can enable the boxes, Chrome cannot).

I want the other browser to have the same functionally as IE. So the boxes can be enabled.

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2  
It would be a lot of work, but technically when you disable the element, you could stack a transparent element on top of it (so the user can't see it), same size/shape, and listen for that click event. When it's enabled, hide/remove that stacked element –  Ian Apr 23 '13 at 16:34
2  
+1 for good-formulated question with fiddle and initial research! –  Alex Shesterov Apr 23 '13 at 16:34
    
@Ian I think you mean "transparent element"? –  Ben McCormick Apr 23 '13 at 16:37
    
Also note that this code disables context menus on every item on the page. –  Ben McCormick Apr 23 '13 at 16:38
    
@ben336 Yeah I guess so. Haha I changed it, thanks –  Ian Apr 23 '13 at 16:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It would be a lot of work, but technically when you disable the element, you could stack a transparent element on top of it (so the user can't see it), same size/shape, and listen for that click event. When it's enabled, hide that stacked element.

Here's something to get you started: http://jsfiddle.net/8dYXd/2/

It uses this structure:

<span>
    <input id='a' type='checkbox' disabled="disabled" />
    <span class="disabled-detector"></span>
</span>

And this CSS:

span {
    position: relative;
}

span.disabled-detector {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    opacity: 0;
}

input+span.disabled-detector {
    display: none;
}

input[disabled]+span.disabled-detector {
    display: inline;
}

Notice how you can still "click" on disabled elements.

You'll have to update it to make sure the click (or contextmenu) event targets both the input and the transparent element. Technically, you could just use the parent <span> - give it a special class, and listen for click events on that. The events will bubble up from its descendants, so that should be fine.

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1  
Thanks for all your help and hard work :) –  Crushinator Apr 23 '13 at 17:03

According to the spec disabled elements should not respond to click events.

What you want to do is overlay an invisible (opacity: 0) element on top of this and use it as a proxy for your events. Just bear in mind that some old browsers don't understand opacity.

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2  
+1 i was about to write this... :) –  PSL Apr 23 '13 at 16:37
1  
When you say "According to spec" what spec are you referring to? –  Crushinator Apr 23 '13 at 16:43
    
This: disabled When set for a form control, this boolean attribute disables the control for user input –  MMM Apr 23 '13 at 16:47
    
Thanks this is a good doc for me to look at –  Crushinator Apr 23 '13 at 17:04

It works to disable the element, but not to re-enable it. This is because disabled elements do not fire mouse events. I do not think that there is a way for you to get this to work in all browsers.

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