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I am very "noob" when it comes to PL/SQL, but I have to specifically write some PL/SQL code (DECLARE/BEGIN/etc.), not just a query.

I'm really trying to find one good example that will hopefully let me grasp the rest of the problems. Here's the one I'm currently trying to figure out:

Write a PL/SQL program to calculate the total number of credits for each student. NOTE: Courses in which a student gets an F do not count toward credit. If a student retakes a class in which he/she got a low grade, it only counts toward credit one time. Output should include the studentnum and total credits.

Student-schema =(studentnum, name, standing, gpa, major)
Class-schema = (schedulenum, semester, department, classnum, days, time, place, enrollment)
Instructor-schema = (name, department, office)
Teaches-schema = (name, schedulenum, semester)
Taking-schema = (studentnum, schedulenum, semester, grade)

Here's one of my pathetic attempts:

DECLARE
    stud_id student.studentnum%TYPE;
    total number(10);
BEGIN
    FOR count IN (SELECT* FROM taking)
    LOOP
        SELECT studentnum, count(*) total
    INTO stud_id, total
    WHERE grade >= 1;
    END LOOP;
END; 
/

In the one above, idk what I'm doing wrong or right. I get an error "exact fetch returns more than requested number of rows" at line 1. I had this error before, and thought that the for loop would solve it. Obviously I was wrong. I don't even know how this would successfully output the results even if it did query it correctly. I'm so lost, and a little direction WILL go a long way.

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What is the total number of credits in your case? Which table/field represents credits? SELECT studentnum, count(*) total INTO stud_id, total FROM??? You always have to include from clause in your select. –  Art Apr 23 '13 at 18:04
    
The total credits are just the total classes the students have taken. So, each class that didn't receive a failing grade counts as a credit. If the same class was taken twice by the same student, it only counts as one credit. –  The Rationalist Apr 23 '13 at 18:16
    
You need to create sample data, e.g. add create table scripts and populate tables with some fake data. In general you need to join Student and Taking (if Taking is total classes student have taken) on studentnum and count takings per student as you are trying to do, but incorrectly. See collapsar example. It calcs totals of takings by student. You need to add a filter to exclude failing grades, smth like and grade <> 'F' or grade > 0... Also, you need to add class to the query and group by studentnum and class. This is how you'd get distinct class/student count... –  Art Apr 23 '13 at 18:30

3 Answers 3

the code below iterates over the result set of students and the count of their grades, not counting 'F' grades. the snippet doesn't implement the restriction that no class may contribute more than one grade; however, it should get you started so you can complement the missing pieces.

DECLARE
    stud_id student.studentnum%TYPE;
    total number(10);
BEGIN
    FOR i IN (
        SELECT s.studentnum  stud
             , COUNT(*)      cnt
          FROM student  s
          JOIN taking   t   on ( t.studentnum   = s.studentnum  )
          JOIN class    c   on ( c.schedulenum  = t.schedulenum )
         WHERE t.grade > 0
      GROUP BY s.studentnum
    ) LOOP
        NULL; -- whatever
    END LOOP;
END; 
/
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Please forgive my ignorance, but where are the s, t, and c values coming from? Are you just renaming each relation? If so, is that necessary? Also, are the joins necessary since taking has the studentnum and grade attributes? I don't see any reason to join them if all the info is in one relation. Thank you very much for your help. I will be practicing using your advice and see how it goes. When I ultimately figure it out, I will mark as answered. –  The Rationalist Apr 23 '13 at 17:15
    
s, t and c are table aliases needed in the joins to refer to columns unambiguously; eg, studentnum is defined in student and taking. the join would indeed be unnecesaary if all information was in a single relation, but i doubt that. the only candidate would be class (because you need the grades) and there is no field id-ing students in this relation (btw, if there was, you would still miss on all students who did not take any classes at all when limiting yourself to this relation). –  collapsar Apr 23 '13 at 17:28

I think select * from taking doesn't return a number, it returns a bunch of rows. If you want the number of rows you need to make it like SELECT count(*) FROM taking

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I tried this, but the exact same error occurs. I must be doing something drastically wrong. –  The Rationalist Apr 23 '13 at 16:36

I do believe I found a proper solution. None of the answers really worked, so I ended up just making a cursor to go through the data. Because of the joins I'm doing, I believe it will filter out duplicate classes taken by the same student:

DECLARE
    CURSOR c IS
        SELECT taking.studentnum, count(*) total
        FROM student, taking, class
        WHERE grade > 0
    AND student.studentnum = taking.studentnum
    AND taking.schedulenum = class.schedulenum
    AND taking.semester = class.semester
    GROUP BY taking.studentnum;
    credits c%ROWTYPE;
BEGIN
    OPEN c;
    LOOP
    FETCH c INTO credits;
        EXIT WHEN c%NOTFOUND;
    dbms_output.put_line('Student#: ' || credits.studentnum || 
        '  Credits: ' || credits.total);
    END LOOP;
END;
/
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