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array =
[ {
        :keyword => "A", 
        :total_value => "10"
    },
    {
        :keyword => "B", 
        :total_value => "5"
    },
    {
        :keyword => "C", 
        :total_value => "15"
    },
    {
        :keyword => "B", 
        :total_value => "6"
    },
    {
        :keyword => "A", 
        :total_value => "50"
    },
    {
        :keyword => "D", 
        :total_value => "40"
    },
    {
        :keyword => "A", 
        :total_value => "30"
    }]

I'm trying to consolidate the hashes with an identical :keyword value. By consolidate, I mean combine :total_value. For example, after consolidation...

new_array =
[ {
        :keyword => "A", 
        :total_value => "90"
    },
    {
        :keyword => "B", 
        :total_value => "11"
    },
    {
        :keyword => "C", 
        :total_value => "15"
    },
    {
        :keyword => "D", 
        :total_value => "40"
    }]
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marked as duplicate by mu is too short, squiguy, sawa, eugen, Frank N. Stein Mar 6 at 12:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
You keep asking the same question over and over again in slightly different forms. Why don't the answers to the other variations work here? –  mu is too short Apr 23 '13 at 17:10
1  
The original answer was correct for the data I supplied. However, I worded the question incorrectly and the solutions did not fix the issue for my actual data. I'm new to ruby, so I don't quite understand how to customize their solutions for my data. –  mnort9 Apr 23 '13 at 17:17
    
To avoid confusion, it might be worthwhile to mention your previous question and explain how this one is different. This may not be obvious at first glance. An easy way to do this would be to put the desired output first, and give the input data second. –  tadman Apr 23 '13 at 18:58
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

inject is your friend:

combined_keywords = array.inject(Hash.new(0)){|acc, oh| acc[oh[:keyword]] += oh[:total_value].to_i ; acc }

Alternatively, the each_with_object method may be more readable in this case:

combined_keywords = array.each_with_object(Hash.new(0)){|oh, newh| newh[oh[:keyword]] += oh[:total_value].to_i }

The two methods above are functionally equivalent.

Last, if you really want this to be in the array-of-hashes style, this will get you there:

combined_keywords.collect{|(k,v)| {:keyword => k,  :total_value => v}}
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1  
each_with_object is sometimes less messy than an inject chain, but is nearly the same structurally. –  tadman Apr 23 '13 at 17:03
    
Thanks, I always forget about each_with_object. I've expanded the answer to include your suggestion. –  Dave S. Apr 23 '13 at 17:08
    
The inject and each_with_object solutions should return a single hash with combined keywords as keys? For me, it's outputting a empty hash. –  mnort9 Apr 23 '13 at 17:10
    
Yes, combined_keywords contains: {"A"=>90, "B"=>11, "C"=>15, "D"=>40}. I'm on 1.9.3 here (it should work in 2.0 as well). I copied/pasted your first block into irb, and this solution works against that. –  Dave S. Apr 23 '13 at 17:19
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I think it could be something like this

new_array = {}
array.each do |hsh|
  new_array[hsh[:keyword]] ||= 0
  new_array[hsh[:keyword]] += hsh[:total_value].to_i
end
share|improve this answer
    
The output from that is going to look more like { "A" => 90, "B" => 11, "C" => 15, "D" => 40 }, isn't it? Maybe you'd need another line on the end to iterate over keys and values in new_array to generate the desired array of hashes. –  pjmorse Apr 23 '13 at 16:55
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