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I have two IIS server machines, A and B. They are both serving an identical ASP.NET Web Forms site.

On A, when I experience an error, I get the detailed error page that shows the source code that generated the exception.

On B, when I experience an error, I get the message...

The source code that generated this unhandled exception can only be shown when compiled in debug mode. To enable this, please follow one of the below steps, then request the URL:

I want server B to also give me the source code and line numbers when I experience an exception. I have ensured that the web page generating the error has the Debug="true" directive, and that the I have the web.config configured for debug (remember, both sites are using identical files).

Error Page from A:

Server Error in '/' Application.
________________________________________
Test error 
Description: An unhandled exception occurred during the execution of the current web request. Please review the stack trace for more information about the error and where it originated in the code. 

Exception Details: System.ApplicationException: Test error

Source Error: 


Line 10:    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
Line 11:        {
Line 12:        throw new ApplicationException("Test error");
Line 13:        }
Line 14:    }

Source File: d:\CallLogsSite\Admin\GenerateError.aspx.cs    Line: 12 

Stack Trace: 


[ApplicationException: Test error]
   Admin_GenerateError.Page_Load(Object sender, EventArgs e) in d:\CallLogsSite\Admin\GenerateError.aspx.cs:12
   System.Web.Util.CalliHelper.EventArgFunctionCaller(IntPtr fp, Object o, Object t, EventArgs e) +14
   System.Web.Util.CalliEventHandlerDelegateProxy.Callback(Object sender, EventArgs e) +35
   System.Web.UI.Control.OnLoad(EventArgs e) +91
   System.Web.UI.Control.LoadRecursive() +74
   System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequestMain(Boolean includeStagesBeforeAsyncPoint, Boolean includeStagesAfterAsyncPoint) +2207

Error Page from B:

Server Error in '/' Application.
________________________________________
Test error 
Description: An unhandled exception occurred during the execution of the current web request. Please review the stack trace for more information about the error and where it originated in the code. 

Exception Details: System.ApplicationException: Test error

Source Error: 
The source code that generated this unhandled exception can only be shown when compiled in debug mode. To enable this, please follow one of the below steps, then request the URL:

1. Add a "Debug=true" directive at the top of the file that generated the error. Example:

  <%@ Page Language="C#" Debug="true" %>

or:

2) Add the following section to the configuration file of your application:

<configuration>
   <system.web>
       <compilation debug="true"/>
   </system.web>
</configuration>

Note that this second technique will cause all files within a given application to be compiled in debug mode. The first technique will cause only that particular file to be compiled in debug mode.

Important: Running applications in debug mode does incur a memory/performance overhead. You should make sure that an application has debugging disabled before deploying into production scenario. 

Stack Trace: 


[ApplicationException: Test error]
   Admin_GenerateError.Page_Load(Object sender, EventArgs e) +46
   System.Web.Util.CalliHelper.EventArgFunctionCaller(IntPtr fp, Object o, Object t, EventArgs e) +14
   System.Web.Util.CalliEventHandlerDelegateProxy.Callback(Object sender, EventArgs e) +35
   System.Web.UI.Control.OnLoad(EventArgs e) +91
   System.Web.UI.Control.LoadRecursive() +74
   System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequestMain(Boolean includeStagesBeforeAsyncPoint, Boolean includeStagesAfterAsyncPoint) +2207

My guess is that for some reason, server B isn't compiling as Debug despite the settings that I have in place.

I think there must be something at the machine level preventing it from giving my source, but I feel like I've checked all the obvious locations in IIS and the machine.config file. Where else should I check to make sure B behaves like A?

Selected portion of my web.config file:

<configuration>
    <system.web>
        <compilation debug="true" targetFramework="4.0">
        </compilation>
    </system.web>
</configuration>

Web Forms code behind file that generates my sample error:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

public partial class Admin_GenerateError : System.Web.UI.Page
    {
    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
        throw new ApplicationException("Test error");
        }
    }

ASPX page for the above code behind:

<%@ Page Title="" Language="C#" MasterPageFile="~/Admin/admin.master" AutoEventWireup="true" CodeFile="GenerateError.aspx.cs" Inherits="Admin_GenerateError" Debug="true" %>

<asp:Content ID="Content1" ContentPlaceHolderID="head" Runat="Server">
</asp:Content>
<asp:Content ID="Content2" ContentPlaceHolderID="body" Runat="Server">
</asp:Content>
share|improve this question
    
On server B, are you accessing the page locally or remotely? –  pinoy_ISF Apr 23 '13 at 17:15
    
Remove the targetFramework="4.0" –  Ramesh Rajendran Apr 23 '13 at 17:24
    
@pinoy_ISF On A and B, whether I access locally or remotely, the output is as I have shown in the original post. –  mason Apr 23 '13 at 21:00
    
@RameshRajendran removing targetFramework="4.0" did not change anything. I have left it removed though, since it doesn't appear to be essential and I think Visual Studio originally inserted that anyway. –  mason Apr 23 '13 at 21:05
    
What is the version of IIS? –  pinoy_ISF Apr 24 '13 at 12:06

2 Answers 2

I will suggest to not open the debug mode to view the actually file and line but to open the trace. The trace is give that informations, the debug give more code to been able to debug the code with a debugger, but on server you do not need that, you only need to know the file and the line.

To open the trace on web.config add it on compiler option as:

<system.codedom>
    <compilers>
        <compiler compilerOptions="/D:RELEASE,TRACE">
        </compiler>
    </compilers>
</system.codedom>

I have here state the RELEASE, you can only keep the trace flag, and open close the debug, from the debug flag.

share|improve this answer
    
No, this does not work. I put this in my web.config and deployed it to A and B. Both A and B then generated the same output as B in my original post. I do not think the solution lies within the web.config, since both sites web.config is the same yet the output is different. –  mason Apr 23 '13 at 21:18
    
@msm8bball Yes, this is the solution. Probably some commands above your web.config not let it work, or you have miss something, but this is the way. –  Aristos Apr 25 '13 at 12:37
    
No, this is not the solution. Adding the xml exactly as you provided underneath the <configuration> node resulted in errors. I googled it and ended up adding the below code. <system.codedom> <compilers> <compiler compilerOptions="/D:RELEASE,TRACE" language="c#;cs;csharp" extension=".cs" > </compiler> </compilers> </system.codedom> Deploying this to A and B results in the same exact output as B in my original post. That is a regression, not progress. –  mason Apr 25 '13 at 15:53

I just had a similar problem, the only difference i could see is that in one server i published the debug version and in the other (the one not showing the error details) i published the release version. When i changed the second one to debug it showed the details again.

share|improve this answer
    
That's good advice for a web application project (so you should leave this answer up in case others come here) but unfortunately doesn't apply to my question which was for a web site project (those largely ignore debug vs release). –  mason Aug 12 at 16:14

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