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How would I find the size in bytes of an array like this?

    double dArray[2][5][3][4];

I've tried this method but it returns "2". Maybe because the array is only declared and not filled with anything?

     #include <iostream>
     #define ARRAY_SIZE(array) (sizeof((array))/sizeof((array[0])))
     using namespace std;

      int main() {
        double dArray[2][5][3][4];
        cout << ARRAY_SIZE(dArray) << endl;
       }
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do you want the size in terms of bytes or the size in terms of how many elements are in the entire array? –  Boumbles Apr 23 '13 at 17:26
    
To get the total number of elements in an array (here: 2*5*3*4), you can use something like template<class T> constexpr std::size_t get_element_count(T const& a) { return sizeof(T)/sizeof(typename std::remove_all_extents<T>::type); } –  dyp Apr 23 '13 at 17:41

2 Answers 2

How would I find the size in bytes

This tells you how many elements are present in an array. And it gives the expected answer of 2 for dArray.

#define ARRAY_SIZE(array) (sizeof((array))/sizeof((array[0])))

If what you want it the byte count, this will do it.

#define ARRAY_SIZE(array) (sizeof(array))

Maybe because the array is only declared and not filled with anything?

That won't affect the behavior of sizeof. An array has no concept of filled or not filled.

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1  
Is there a reason for the double brackets in the first macro ((array))? –  dyp Apr 23 '13 at 17:26
    
@DyP No functional reason that I'm aware of. It's the code presented in the question. :) –  Drew Dormann Apr 23 '13 at 17:27
    
Pretty sure OP is having more trouble getting 2*5*3*4 than converting from elem to bytes. –  djechlin Apr 23 '13 at 17:33
    
One could argue the name of the first macro would be clearer if it was ARRAY_LENGTH (or ARRAY_EXTENT). Also, there's the C++11 approach using std::extent, like template<class T> constexpr std::size_t get_extent(T const& a) { return std::extent<T>::value; } –  dyp Apr 23 '13 at 17:34
    
OIC. Nevermind, this is right - problem is array[0] was giant so OP should have been dividing by sizeof array[0][0][0][0] to get elem count. –  djechlin Apr 23 '13 at 17:35

array[0] contains 5 * 3 * 4 elements so sizeof(array) / sizeof(array[0]) will give you 2 when the first dimension of your array is 2

Rewrite your macro as:

#define ARRAY_SIZE(array, type) (sizeof((array))/sizeof((type)))

to get the number of elements,

or simply sizeof(array) to get the number of bytes.

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