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I am having a problem with this program which is to print out a list forwards and backwards, however When I print out the list backwards the first number in the list is a random massive number rather than the right number. e.g.

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0
4286398 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

can anyone explain what is wrong with my code please.

Also Can anyone tell me how I could pass the counter from the printList function to a new function called checkList() so that the counter has the same value in checkList() as what it is at the end of printList().

code:

void printList(int array1[]){
int counter = 0;
int x;
ifstream theFile("list.txt");

while(theFile >> x){
    array1[x] = x;
    cout << array1[x] << " ";
    counter = counter + 1;
}
cout << endl << counter << endl;;

int n = counter;

for(int i = n -1; i >= 0; i--){
    cout << array1[i] << " ";
}
share|improve this question
3  
it looks like a garbage number –  Sam I am Apr 23 '13 at 17:47
    
What are the contents of list.txt? –  kotlinski Apr 23 '13 at 17:48
    
it also looks like you're printing your counter. why isn't that part of the output you've posted –  Sam I am Apr 23 '13 at 17:50
1  
@Thomas if you have 0-8 and then 0 again, the problem is the statement array1[x] = x. Your counter will be at 9, but you have never written array[9] and so you get uninitialized garbage. –  Nik Bougalis Apr 23 '13 at 17:55
1  
@NikBougalis that is a more articulate explanation than any of the correct answers posted here –  Sam I am Apr 23 '13 at 17:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have a problem because of the line array1[x]=x;. Your code would actually work if the numbers in your file were 0..9, but the final number is another 0, so you don't set array1[9] to anything.

You should have some variable for indexing the array, something like:

int counter = 0;
while(theFile >> x){
    array1[counter] = x;
    cout << array1[counter] << " ";
    counter = counter + 1;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
If he's outputting what he just read, he should also have cout << array1[counter]. –  James Kanze Apr 23 '13 at 17:53
    
Yeah, sorry, missed that line :) –  Kells1986 Apr 23 '13 at 17:54

Here's the culprit:

array1[x] = x;

If your array input values are 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0, then at the last iteration of your loop you're doing array1[0] = 0. That overwrites the first item in your array, while incrementing the counter. Then, when you reverse it array[9] contains garbage value because you never set it.

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you are doing

array1[0] = 0;
array1[1] = 1;
array1[2] = 2;
array1[3] = 3;
array1[4] = 4;
array1[5] = 5;
array1[6] = 6;
array1[7] = 7;
array1[8] = 8;
array1[0] = 0; // here

array1[9] is uninitialized

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You have some serious issues in the code:

ifstream theFile("list.txt");
while(theFile >> x){
   array1[x] = x;//^^this is evil
   cout << array1[x] << " ";
   counter = counter + 1;
}
cout << endl << counter << endl;;
                             //^^extra colon, though not wrong here but not good practice

You read from file and fill the array, in your special case, you have:

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0

You have 10 elements, but your array1 will end up with 9 since the last read was 0 and array1[0] was written as 0 again. So when you output your array1, you will never get 10 numbers since your array actually stores 9 numbers. that's why you saw garbage value if you try to access array1[9], which value has not been filled, some garbage raw memory value.

Instead, you can try to do the following:

int counter = 0;
int x;
ifstream theFile("list.txt");

while(theFile >> x){
    array1[counter] = x;
    cout << array1[counter] << " ";
    counter = counter + 1;
}
cout << endl << counter << endl;;
share|improve this answer

You are counting wrong upwards and eventually hit uninitialized memory AFTER your array. You should pass the length of your array as a parameter to your function.
As arrays decay to pointers you won't be able to recover its length.

void printList(int array1[], into size){ }

Then thou don't need to figure out its length so complicated.

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2  
Actually, he should just take a std::vector<int>&, and use push_back. Then he can output the reversed array using rbegin() and rend(). –  James Kanze Apr 23 '13 at 17:52
    
True, but if OP wants to use arrays, fine with me :-P –  bash.d Apr 23 '13 at 17:54
    
Given the way the question was stated, I suspect that it is homework, and he has to use C style arrays, even if it is "wrong" in this context. I have the impression that there are a lot of bad teachers out there. –  James Kanze Apr 24 '13 at 8:04
    
Agreed! Maybe they are back from the old days, when PDP-11 was high-end ;) –  bash.d Apr 24 '13 at 8:05

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