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I am able to read and slice pandas dataframe using python datetime objects, however I am forced to use only existing dates in index. For example, this works:

>>> data
<class 'pandas.core.frame.DataFrame'>
DatetimeIndex: 252 entries, 2010-12-31 00:00:00 to 2010-04-01 00:00:00
Data columns:
Adj Close    252  non-null values
dtypes: float64(1)

>>> st = datetime.datetime(2010, 12, 31, 0, 0)
>>> en = datetime.datetime(2010, 12, 28, 0, 0)

>>> data[st:en]
            Adj Close
Date                 
2010-12-31     593.97
2010-12-30     598.86
2010-12-29     601.00
2010-12-28     598.92

However if I use a start or end date that is not present in the DF, I get python KeyError.

My Question : How do I query the dataframe object for a date range; even when the start and end dates are not present in the DataFrame. Does pandas allow for range based slicing?

I am using pandas version 0.10.1

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2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Use searchsorted to find the nearest times first, and then use it to slice.

In [15]: df = pd.DataFrame([1, 2, 3], index=[dt.datetime(2013, 1, 1), dt.datetime(2013, 1, 3), dt.datetime(2013, 1, 5)])

In [16]: df
Out[16]: 
            0
2013-01-01  1
2013-01-03  2
2013-01-05  3

In [22]: start = df.index.searchsorted(dt.datetime(2013, 1, 2))

In [23]: end = df.index.searchsorted(dt.datetime(2013, 1, 4))

In [24]: df.ix[start:end]
Out[24]: 
            0
2013-01-03  2
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If I copy paste your example, it works fine. But the start and end variables in my program, always default to the length of the dataframe! what am I doing wrong? - pastebin.com/raw.php?i=hfpHqF7s –  Rishabh Sagar Apr 23 '13 at 22:21
    
Seems you should sort your DataFrame in ascending order. –  waitingkuo Apr 24 '13 at 1:28
    
Thanks, it worked when the data was in sorted in ascending order. –  Rishabh Sagar Apr 24 '13 at 6:21
    
Note that searchsorted is no longer defined on DataFrame or Series, see this question. –  Wilfred Hughes Jan 15 at 17:23

Short answer: Sort your data (data.sort()) and then I think everything will work the way you are expecting.

Yes, you can slice using datetimes not present in the DataFrame. For example:

In [12]: df
Out[12]: 
                   0
2013-04-20  1.120024
2013-04-21 -0.721101
2013-04-22  0.379392
2013-04-23  0.924535
2013-04-24  0.531902
2013-04-25 -0.957936

In [13]: df['20130419':'20130422']
Out[13]: 
                   0
2013-04-20  1.120024
2013-04-21 -0.721101
2013-04-22  0.379392

As you can see, you don't even have to build datetime objects; strings work.

Because the datetimes in your index are not sequential, the behavior is weird. If we shuffle the index of my example here...

In [17]: df
Out[17]: 
                   0
2013-04-22  1.120024
2013-04-20 -0.721101
2013-04-24  0.379392
2013-04-23  0.924535
2013-04-21  0.531902
2013-04-25 -0.957936

...and take the same slice, we get a different result. It returns the first element inside the range and stops at the first element outside the range.

In [18]: df['20130419':'20130422']
Out[18]: 
                   0
2013-04-22  1.120024
2013-04-20 -0.721101
2013-04-24  0.379392

This is probably not useful behavior. If you want to select ranges of dates, would it make sense to sort it by date first?

df.sort()
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When I try to do this, I get an python exception: TimeSeriesError: Partial indexing only valid for ordered time series. –  Rishabh Sagar Apr 23 '13 at 22:27
    
The exception was self explanatory - I had missed sorting the data, :( - Thanks, text based slicing as you've shown above works as expected. But I used the searchsorted function since the dates in program were already datetime objects. –  Rishabh Sagar Apr 24 '13 at 6:25
    
df['20130419':'20130422'] is exceptional! Even works with sparse data (e.g. specifying a date that doesn't exist in the index). Thank you! –  fantabolous Jun 26 '14 at 4:10

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