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My title isn't exactly the best but I'm not sure how to name what I am trying to do. Either way, I have a case-switch...

    switch (input) {
        case "A":
            Item item = new Item();
            System.out.print("Enter a barcode: ");
            barCode = scan.nextLine();
            item.setBarCode(barCode);

            if (store.addItem(barCode)) {
                System.out.println(store.stockedItems.get(barCode).getProductName()
                        + " has been added to the store's inventory");
            }

            else {
                item.setQuantity(1);
                System.out.print("Enter the item's name: ");
                productName = scan.nextLine();
                productName = productName.toLowerCase();
                item.setProductName(productName);
                store.stockedItems.put(barCode, item);

                System.out.println(store.stockedItems.get(barCode).getProductName()
                        + " has been added to the store's inventory");
            }
            break;
    }

This is just one case. What this does is when the user picks A to add an object to my data structure, it finds out if the barcode mentioned is already in use.

If it is, it just increments the quantity of the object in my data structure.

If the barcode is not in use and after checking its validity. It will prompt the user for the name of the object and then proceed to add it to my data structure.

Now the problem is after I input the barcode string and call the setter function in its respective object class:

public void setBarCode(String code) {
    if (!code.matches("[0-9]+") || code.length() != 12) {
        System.out.println("The barcode entered is not in valid format.  Entry ignored.");
    } else {
        barcode = code;
    }
}

This function just makes sure it is numeric and 12 characters long. If it's not, I want to ignore the entry and start over from the menu. The problem I have is that the program moves on to asking for the items name even if the barcode is invalid and not set.

How do I skip all that and just print the menu out again?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The setter setBarCode() should either (a) succeed, or (b) indicate failure (probably using an IllegalArgumentException since we're in Java) rather than fail silently. If you were to use an IllegalArgumentException, this code would work nicely:

boolean acceptable;
try {
    item.setBarCode(barCode);
    acceptable = true;
}
catch(IllegalArgumentException e) {
    acceptable = false;
}

if(acceptable) {
        if(store.addItem(barCode)){
            System.out.println(store.stockedItems.get(barCode).getProductName() + " has been added to the store's inventory");
        }
        else {
            item.setQuantity(1);
            System.out.print("Enter the item's name: ");
            productName = scan.nextLine();
            productName = productName.toLowerCase();
            item.setProductName(productName);
            store.stockedItems.put(barCode, item);

            System.out.println(store.stockedItems.get(barCode).getProductName() + " has been added to the store's inventory");
        }
}

break;

However, I'd recommend you not rely on the failure of a setter for correctness. Stylistically, it "smells funny." Rather, I'd put the test in another (probably static) method, test before you call the setter and react accordingly, and then put an assert in the setter. So, more like this:

// Somewhere up in your code -- Sorry, fixed up your regex
private static final Pattern BARCODE=Pattern.compile("^\\d{12}$");
public static boolean isValidBarcode(String candidate) {
    return BARCODE.matcher(candidate).matches();
}

// Now your "real" code
case "A":

    Item item = new Item();
    System.out.print("Enter a barcode: ");
    barCode = scan.nextLine();
    if(isValidBarCode(barCode)) {
        item.setBarCode(barCode);
        if(store.addItem(barCode)) {
            System.out.println(store.stockedItems.get(barCode).getProductName() + " has been added to the store's inventory");
        }
        else {
            item.setQuantity(1);
            System.out.print("Enter the item's name: ");
            productName = scan.nextLine();
            productName = productName.toLowerCase();
            item.setProductName(productName);
            store.stockedItems.put(barCode, item);

            System.out.println(store.stockedItems.get(barCode).getProductName() + " has been added to the store's inventory");
        }
    }
    else {
        System.out.println("That's not a valid bar code.");
    }
    break;

// And, finally, your setBarCode() method
public void setBarCode(String code) {
    assert isValidBarCode(code);
    barcode = code;
}
share|improve this answer

Two strategies can work for this:

  1. move the check for barcode validity outside the setBarCode method and do that test first (or modify setBarCode to return a boolean indicating whether the bar code was valid).
  2. modify addItem to return something more informative than a boolean so that you can distinguish three cases: bad bar code; succeeded; failed because it needs more info.
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