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File1:

hello
- dictionary definitions:
hi
hello
hallo
greetings
salutations
no more hello for you
-
world
- dictionary definitions:
universe
everything
the globe
the biggest tree
planet
cess pool of organic life
-

I need to format this (for a huge list of words) into a term to definition format (one line per term). How can one achieve this? None of the words are the same, only the structure seen above is. The resultant file would look something like this:

hello    - dictionary definitions:    hi    hello    hallo    greetings    salutations    no more hello for you    -
world    - dictionary definitions:    universe    everything    the globe    the biggest tree    planet    cess pool of organic life    -

Awk/Sed/Grep/Cat are the usual contenders.

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Changed question to be more scripting language/command specific. –  user191960 Oct 24 '09 at 10:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
awk 'BEGIN {FS="\n"; RS="-\n"}{for(i=1;i<=NF;i++) printf("%s   ",$i); if($1)print"-";}' dict.txt

outputs:

hello   - dictionary definitions:   hi   hello   hallo   greetings   salutations   no more hello for you   -
world   - dictionary definitions:   universe   everything   the globe   the biggest tree   planet   cess pool of organic life   -
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I love you man! That is a friggin' huge command - and it works perfectly. –  user191960 Oct 24 '09 at 11:12
    
Note if you need to handles empty line at the end of the file you will need to add an if: awk 'BEGIN {FS="\n"; RS="-\n"}{if(NF>2){for(i=1;i<=NF;i++)printf("%s ",$i);print("-");}}' dict.txt –  RC. Oct 24 '09 at 11:15
    
Thanks for the tip RC. –  user191960 Oct 24 '09 at 11:16

and who says only Perl can do it elegantly ? :)

$ gawk -vRS="-\n" '{gsub(/\n/," ")}1' file
hello - dictionary definitions: hi hello hallo greetings salutations no more hello for you
world - dictionary definitions: universe everything the globe the biggest tree planet cess pool of organic life

OR

# gawk 'BEGIN{RS="-\n";FS="\n";OFS=" "}{$1=$1}1'  file
hello - dictionary definitions: hi hello hallo greetings salutations no more hello for you
world - dictionary definitions: universe everything the globe the biggest tree planet cess pool of organic life
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You have to be careful of lines that end in - with RS set like that... –  ephemient Oct 24 '09 at 18:08
    
don't understand. is it <start><space>bar<space>? or just <bar><space>? –  ghostdog74 Oct 24 '09 at 23:37

A perl one-liner:

perl -pe 'chomp;s/^-$/\n/;print " "' File1

gives

 hello - dictionary definitions: hi hello hallo greetings salutations no more hello for you
 world - dictionary definitions: universe everything the globe the biggest tree planet cess pool of organic life

This is 'something like' your required output.

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Nice! More elegant then the one above. I've heard that perl is awesome for its text manipulation abilities. –  user191960 Oct 24 '09 at 11:22
    
Perl is awesome, so is awk, its grand-daddy :) –  ghostdog74 Oct 24 '09 at 11:57
    
Yes, Larry Wall certainly gave credit to awk, no doubt about that. –  pavium Oct 24 '09 at 12:15

Not sure the scripting language you will be using, pseudo code here:

for each line
 if line is "-"
  create new line
 else
  append separator to previous line
  append line to previous line
 end if
end for loop
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Try this one liner works on a conditions that theer will always be 6 lines for a word

sed 'N;N;N;N;N;N;N;N;s/\n/ /g' test_3
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not flexible enough. you will never know how many definitions there are –  ghostdog74 Oct 24 '09 at 11:56
sed -ne'1{x;d};/^-$/{g;s/\n/ /g;p;n;x;d};H'
awk -v'RS=\n-\n' '{gsub(/\n/," ")}1'
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