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Preface: I'm attemping to use the repository pattern in a MVC architecture with relational databases.

I've recently started learning TDD in PHP, and I'm realizing that my database is coupled much too closely with the rest of my application. I've read about repositories, and using an IoC container to "inject" it into my controllers. Very cool stuff. But now have some practical questions about repository design. Consider the follow example.

<?php

class DbUserRepository implements UserRepositoryInterface
{
    protected $db;

    public function __construct($db)
    {
        $this->db = $db;
    }

    public function findAll()
    {
    }

    public function findById($id)
    {
    }

    public function findByName($name)
    {
    }

    public function create($user)
    {
    }

    public function remove($user)
    {
    }

    public function update($user)
    {
    }
}

Issue #1: Too many fields

All of these find methods use a select all fields (SELECT *) approach. However, in my apps I'm always trying to limit the number of fields I get, as this often adds overhead and slows things down. For those using this pattern, how do you deal with this?

Issue #2: Too many methods

While this class looks nice right now, I know that in a real world app I need a lot more methods. For example:

  • findAllByNameAndStatus
  • findAllInCountry
  • findAllWithEmailAddressSet
  • findAllByAgeAndGender
  • findAllByAgeAndGenderOrderByAge
  • Etc.

As you can see, there could be very, very long list of possible methods. And then if you add in the field selection issue above, the problem worsens. In the past I'd normally just put all this logic right in my controller:

<?php

class MyController
{
    public function users()
    {
        $users = User::select('name, email, status')->byCountry('Canada')->orderBy('name')->rows()

        return View::make('users', array('users' => $users))
    }

}

With my repository approach, I don't want to end up with this:

<?php

class MyController
{
    public function users()
    {
        $users = $this->repo->get_first_name_last_name_email_username_status_by_country_order_by_name('Canada');

        return View::make('users', array('users' => $users))
    }

}

Issue #3: Impossible to match an interface

I see the benefit in using interfaces for repositories, so I can swap out my implementation (for testing purposes or other). My understanding of interfaces is that they define a contract that an implementation must follow. This is great until you start adding additional methods to your repositories like findAllInCountry(). Now I need to update my interface to also have this method, otherwise other implementations may not have it, and that could break my application. By this feels insane...a case of the tail wagging the dog.

Specification Pattern?

This leads me to believe that repository should only have a fixed number of methods (like save(), remove(), find(), findAll(), etc). But then how do I run specific lookups? I've heard of the Specification Pattern, but it seems to me that this only reduces an entire set of records (via IsSatisfiedBy()), which clearly has major performance issues if you're pulling from a database.

Help?

Clearly I need to rethink things a little when working with repositories. Can anyone enlighten on how this is best handled?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 41 down vote accepted

I thought I'd take a crack at answering my own question. What follows is just one way of solving the issues 1-3 in my original question.

Disclaimer: I may not always use the right terms when describing patterns or techniques. Sorry for that.

The Goals:

  • Create a complete example of a basic controller for viewing and editing Users.
  • All code must be fully testable and mockable.
  • The controller should have no idea where the data is stored (meaning it can be changed).
  • Example to show a SQL implementation (most common).
  • For maximum performance, controllers should only receive the data they need—no extra fields.
  • Implementation should leverage some type of data mapper for ease of development.
  • Implementation should have the ability to perform complex data lookups.

The Solution

I'm splitting my persistent storage (database) interaction into two categories: R (Read) and CUD (Create, Update, Delete). My experience has been that reads are really what causes an application to slow down. And while data manipulation (CUD) is actually slower, it happens much less frequently, and is therefore much less of a concern.

CUD (Create, Update, Delete) is easy. This will involve working with actual models, which are then passed to my Repositories for persistence. Note, my repositories will still provide a Read method, but simply for object creation, not display. More on that later.

R (Read) is not so easy. No models here, just value objects. Use arrays if you prefer. These objects may represent a single model or a blend of many models, anything really. These are not very interesting on their own, but how they are generated is. I'm using what I'm calling Query Objects.

The Code:

User Model

Let's start simple with our basic user model. Note that there is no ORM extending or database stuff at all. Just pure model glory. Add your getters, setters, validation, whatever.

class User
{
    public $id;
    public $first_name;
    public $last_name;
    public $gender;
    public $email;
    public $password;
}

Repository Interface

Before I create my user repository, I want to create my repository interface. This will define the "contract" that repositories must follow in order to be used by my controller. Remember, my controller will not know where the data is actually stored.

Note that my repositories will only every contain these three methods. The save() method is responsible for both creating and updating users, simply depending on whether or not the user object has an id set.

interface UserRepositoryInterface
{
    public function find($id);
    public function save(User $user);
    public function remove(User $user);
}

SQL Repository Implementation

Now to create my implementation of the interface. As mentioned, my example was going to be with an SQL database. Note the use of a data mapper to prevent having to write repetitive SQL queries.

class SQLUserRepository implements UserRepositoryInterface
{
    protected $db;

    public function __construct(Database $db)
    {
        $this->db = $db;
    }

    public function find($id)
    {
        // Find a record with the id = $id
        // from the 'users' table
        // and return it as a User object
        return $this->db->find($id, 'users', 'User');
    }

    public function save(User $user)
    {
        // Insert or update the $user
        // in the 'users' table
        $this->db->save($user, 'users');
    }

    public function remove(User $user)
    {
        // Remove the $user
        // from the 'users' table
        $this->db->remove($user, 'users');
    }
}

Query Object Interface

Now with CUD (Create, Update, Delete) taken care of by our repository, we can focus on the R (Read). Query objects are simply an encapsulation of some type of data lookup logic. They are not query builders. By abstracting it like our repository we can change it's implementation and test it easier. An example of a Query Object might be an AllUsersQuery or AllActiveUsersQuery, or even MostCommonUserFirstNames.

You may be thinking "can't I just create methods in my repositories for those queries?" Yes, but here is why I'm not doing this:

  • My repositories are meant for working with model objects. In a real world app, why would I ever need to get the password field if I'm looking to list all my users?
  • Repositories are often model specific, yet queries often involve more than one model. So what repository do you put your method in?
  • This keeps my repositories very simple—not an bloated class of methods.
  • All queries are now organized into their own classes.
  • Really, at this point, repositories exist simply to abstract my database layer.

For my example I'll create a query object to lookup "AllUsers". Here is the interface:

interface AllUsersQueryInterface
{
    public function fetch($fields);
}

Query Object Implementation

This is where we can use a data mapper again to help speed up development. Notice that I am allowing one tweak to the returned dataset—the fields. This is about as far as I want to go with manipulating the performed query. Remember, my query objects are not query builders. They simply perform a specific query. However, since I know that I'll probably be using this one a lot, in a number of different situations, I'm giving myself the ability to specify the fields. I never want to return fields I don't need!

class AllUsersQuery implements AllUsersQueryInterface
{
    protected $db;

    public function __construct(Database $db)
    {
        $this->db = $db;
    }

    public function fetch($fields)
    {
        return $this->db->select($fields)->from('users')->orderBy('last_name, first_name')->rows();
    }
}

Before moving on to the controller, I want to show another example to illustrate how powerful this is. Maybe I have a reporting engine and need to create a report for AllOverdueAccounts. This could be tricky with my data mapper, and I may want to write some actual SQL in this situation. No problem, here is what this query object could look like:

class AllOverdueAccountsQuery implements AllOverdueAccountsQueryInterface
{
    protected $db;

    public function __construct(Database $db)
    {
        $this->db = $db;
    }

    public function fetch()
    {
        return $this->db->query($this->sql())->rows();
    }

    public function sql()
    {
        return "SELECT...";
    }
}

This nicely keeps all my logic for this report in one class, and it's easy to test. I can mock it to my hearts content, or even use a different implementation entirely.

The Controller

Now the fun part—bringing all the pieces together. Note that I am using dependency injection. Typically dependencies are injected into the constructor, but I actually prefer to inject them right into my controller methods (routes). This minimizes the controller's object graph, and I actually find it more legible. Note, if you don't like this approach, just use the traditional constructor method.

class UsersController
{
    public function index(AllUsersQueryInterface $query)
    {
        // Fetch user data
        $users = $query->fetch(['first_name', 'last_name', 'email']);

        // Return view
        return Response::view('all_users.php', ['users' => $users]);
    }

    public function add()
    {
        return Response::view('add_user.php');
    }

    public function insert(UserRepositoryInterface $repository)
    {
        // Create new user model
        $user = new User;
        $user->first_name = $_POST['first_name'];
        $user->last_name = $_POST['last_name'];
        $user->gender = $_POST['gender'];
        $user->email = $_POST['email'];

        // Save the new user
        $repository->save($user);

        // Return the id
        return Response::json(['id' => $user->id]);
    }

    public function view(SpecificUserQueryInterface $query, $id)
    {
        // Load user data
        if (!$user = $query->fetch($id, ['first_name', 'last_name', 'gender', 'email'])) {
            return Response::notFound();
        }

        // Return view
        return Response::view('view_user.php', ['user' => $user]);
    }

    public function edit(SpecificUserQueryInterface $query, $id)
    {
        // Load user data
        if (!$user = $query->fetch($id, ['first_name', 'last_name', 'gender', 'email'])) {
            return Response::notFound();
        }

        // Return view
        return Response::view('edit_user.php', ['user' => $user]);
    }

    public function update(UserRepositoryInterface $repository)
    {
        // Load user model
        if (!$user = $repository->find($id)) {
            return Response::notFound();
        }

        // Update the user
        $user->first_name = $_POST['first_name'];
        $user->last_name = $_POST['last_name'];
        $user->gender = $_POST['gender'];
        $user->email = $_POST['email'];

        // Save the user
        $repository->save($user);

        // Return success
        return true;
    }

    public function delete(UserRepositoryInterface $repository)
    {
        // Load user model
        if (!$user = $repository->find($id)) {
            return Response::notFound();
        }

        // Delete the user
        $repository->delete($user);

        // Return success
        return true;
    }
}

Final Thoughts:

The important things to note here are that when I'm modifying (creating, updating or deleting) entities, I'm working with real model objects, and performing the persistance through my repositories.

However, when I'm displaying (selecting data and sending it to the views) I'm not working with model objects, but rather plain old value objects. I only select the fields I need, and it's designed so I can maximum my data lookup performance.

My repositories stay very clean, and instead this "mess" is organized into my model queries.

I use a data mapper to help with development, as it's just ridiculous to write repetitive SQL for common tasks. However, you absolutely can write SQL where needed (complicated queries, reporting, etc.). And when you do, it's nicely tucked away into a properly named class.

I'd love to hear your take on my approach!

share|improve this answer
    
Why are you still tightly coupling Response with your controller? –  PeeHaa Apr 24 at 15:43
1  
@PeeHaa Again, it was to keep the examples simple. It's very common to leave pieces of code out of an example if they don't pertain specifically to the topic at hand. In reality, I would pass in my dependencies. –  Jonathan Apr 24 at 18:38
2  
Interesting that you split up your Create, Update and Delete from your Read. Thought it would be worth mentioning Command Query Responsibility Segregation (CQRS) which formally does just that. martinfowler.com/bliki/CQRS.html –  Adam Jun 26 at 8:54
1  
@Jonathan It's been one and a half year since you answered your own question. I was wondering if you are still happy with your answer and if this is your main solution now for most of your projects? The last few weeks I've been reading allot on repositories and I've seen allot of people have their own interpretation of how it should be implemented. Your calling it query objects, but this an existing pattern right? I think I've seen it being used in other languages. –  Boedy Oct 13 at 12:06
1  
@Jonathan: How you handle queries that should fina a user not be "ID" but e.g. by "username" or even more complicated queries with more than one condition? –  Gizzmo Oct 28 at 8:09

Based on my experience, here are some answers to your questions:

Q: How do we deal with bringing back fields we don't need?

A: From my experience this really boils down to dealing with complete entities versus ad-hoc queries.

A complete entity is something like a User object. It has properties and methods, etc. It's a first class citizen in your codebase.

An ad-hoc query returns some data, but we don't know anything beyond that. As the data gets passed around the application, it is done so without context. Is it a User? A User with some Order information attached? We don't really know.

I prefer working with full entities.

You are right that you will often bring back data you won't use, but you can address this in various ways:

  1. Aggressively cache the entities so you only pay the read price once from the database.
  2. Spend more time modeling your entities so they have good distinctions between them. (Consider splitting a large entity into two smaller entities, etc.)
  3. Consider having multiple versions of entities. You can have a User for the back end and maybe a UserSmall for AJAX calls. One might have 10 properties and one has 3 properties.

The downsides of working with ad-hoc queries:

  1. You end up with essentially the same data across many queries. For example, with a User, you'll end up writing essentially the same select * for many calls. One call will get 8 of 10 fields, one will get 5 of 10, one will get 7 of 10. Why not replace all with one call that gets 10 out of 10? The reason this is bad is that it is murder to re-factor/test/mock.
  2. It becomes very hard to reason at a high level about your code over time. Instead of statements like "Why is the User so slow?" you end up tracking down one-off queries and so bug fixes tend to be small and localized.
  3. It's really hard to replace the underlying technology. If you store everything in MySQL now and want to move to MongoDB, it's a lot harder to replace 100 ad-hoc calls than it is a handful of entities.

Q: I will have too many methods in my repository.

A: I haven't really seen any way around this other than consolidating calls. The method calls in your repository really map to features in your application. The more features, the more data specific calls. You can push back on features and try to merge similar calls into one.

The complexity at the end of the day has to exist somewhere. With a repository pattern we've pushed it into the repository interface instead of maybe making a bunch of stored procedures.

Sometimes I have to tell myself, "Well it had to give somewhere! There are no silver bullets."

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the very thorough answer. You've got me thinking now. My big concern here is that everything I read says don't SELECT *, rather only select the fields you require. For example, see this question. As for all those ad-hock queries you speak of, I certainly understand where you're coming from. I have a very large app right now that has many of them. That was my "Well it had to give somewhere!" moment, I opted for maximum performance. However, now I'm dealing with LOTS of different queries. –  Jonathan Apr 23 '13 at 22:50
1  
One follow up thought. I've seen a recommendation to use a R—CUD approach. Since reads are often where performance issues arise, you could use a more custom query approach for them, that don't translate into real business objects. Then, for create, update and delete, use an ORM, which works with whole objects. Any thoughts on that approach? –  Jonathan Apr 23 '13 at 22:54
    
As a note for using "select *". I've done it in the past and it worked ok - until we hit varchar(max) fields. Those killed our queries. So if you have tables with ints, small text fields, etc. it's not that bad. Feels unnatural, but software goes that way. What was bad is suddenly good and vice versa. –  ryan1234 Apr 23 '13 at 23:03
    
I haven't heard about the R-CUD approach, but it sounds good! Makes sense to me. I would do some work investigating how you could cache reads with more "full" objects before going down the R-CUD road. I'm curious to see if you have success with it though. There are pros and cons to the various approaches and I've seen the full entity thing work pretty well and I've seen the ad-hoc read stuff work. The real pain with the ad-hoc reads is re-factoring/changing the underlying data store. That's where it has bitten me in the past. –  ryan1234 Apr 23 '13 at 23:05
    
The R-CUD approach is actually CQRS –  MikeSW Apr 29 '13 at 11:39

I can only comment on the way we (at my company) deal with this. First of all performance is not too much of an issue for us, but having clean/proper code is.

First of all we define Models such as a UserModel that uses an ORM to create UserEntity objects. When a UserEntity is loaded from a model all fields are loaded. For fields referencing foreign entities we use the appropriate foreign model to create the respective entities. For those entities the data will be loaded ondemand. Now your initial reaction might be ...???...!!! let me give you an example a bit of an example:

class UserEntity extends PersistentEntity
{
    public function getOrders()
    {
        $this->getField('orders'); //OrderModel creates OrderEntities with only the ID's set
    }
}

class UserModel {
    protected $orm;

    public function findUsers(IGetOptions $options = null)
    {
        return $orm->getAllEntities(/*...*/); // Orm creates a list of UserEntities
    }
}

class OrderEntity extends PersistentEntity {} // user your imagination
class OrderModel
{
    public function findOrdersById(array $ids, IGetOptions $options = null)
    {
        //...
    }
}

In our case $db is an ORM that is able to load entities. The model instructs the ORM to load a set of entities of a specific type. The ORM contains a mapping and uses that to inject all the fields for that entity in to the entity. For foreign fields however only the id's of those objects are loaded. In this case the OrderModel creates OrderEntitys with only the id's of the referenced orders. When PersistentEntity::getField gets called by the OrderEntity the entity instructs it's model to lazy load all the fields into the OrderEntitys. All the OrderEntitys associated with one UserEntity are treated as one result-set and will be loaded at once.

The magic here is that our model and ORM inject all data into the entities and that entities merely provide wrapper functions for the generic getField method supplied by PersistentEntity. To summarize we always load all the fields, but fields referencing a foreign entity are loaded when necessary. Just loading a bunch of fields is not really a performance issue. Load all possible foreign entities however would be a HUGE performance decrease.

Now on to loading a specific set of users, based on a where clause. We provide an object oriented package of classes that allow you to specify simple expression that can be glued together. In the example code I named it GetOptions. It's a wrapper for all possible options for a select query. It contains a collection of where clauses, a group by clause and everything else. Our where clauses are quite complicated but you could obviously make a simpler version easily.

$objOptions->getConditionHolder()->addConditionBind(
    new ConditionBind(
        new Condition('orderProduct.product', ICondition::OPERATOR_IS, $argObjProduct)
    )
);

A simplest version of this system would be to pass the WHERE part of the query as a string directly to the model.

I'm sorry for this quite complicated response. I tried to summarize our framework as quickly and clear as possible. If you have any additional questions feel free to ask them and I'll update my answer.

EDIT: Additionally if you really don't want to load some fields right away you could specify a lazy loading option in your ORM mapping. Because all fields are eventually loaded through the getField method you could load some fields last minute when that method is called. This is not a very big problem in PHP, but I would not recommend for other systems.

share|improve this answer

These are some different solutions I've seen. There are pros and cons to each of them, but it is for you to decide.

Issue #1: Too many fields

This is an important aspect especially when you take in to account Index-Only Scans. I see two solutions to dealing with this problem. You can update your functions to take in an optional array parameter that would contain a list of a columns to return. If this parameter is empty you'd return all of the columns in the query. This can be a little weird; based off the parameter you could retrieve an object or an array. You could also duplicate all of your functions so that you have two distinct functions that run the same query, but one returns an array of columns and the other returns an object.

public function findColumnsById($id, array $columns = array()){
    if (empty($columns)) {
        // use *
    }
}

public function findById($id) {
    $data = $this->findColumnsById($id);
}

Issue #2: Too many methods

I briefly worked with Propel ORM a year ago and this is based off what I can remember from that experience. Propel has the option to generate its class structure based off the existing database schema. It creates two objects for each table. The first object is a long list of access function similar to what you have currently listed; findByAttribute($attribute_value). The next object inherits from this first object. You can update this child object to build in your more complex getter functions.

Another solution would be using __call() to map non defined functions to something actionable. Your __call method would be would be able to parse the findById and findByName into different queries.

public function __call($function, $arguments) {
    if (strpos($function, 'findBy') === 0) {
        $parameter = substr($function, 6, strlen($function));
        // SELECT * FROM $this->table_name WHERE $parameter = $arguments[0]
    }
}

I hope this helps at least some what.

share|improve this answer

I'll add a bit on this as I am currently trying to grasp all of this myself.

#1 and 2

This is a perfect place for your ORM to do the heavy lifting. If you are using a model that implements some kind of ORM, you can just use it's methods to take care of these things. Make your own orderBy functions that implement the Eloquent methods if you need to. Using Eloquent for instance:

class DbUserRepository implements UserRepositoryInterface
{
    public function findAll()
    {
        return User::all();
    }

    public function get(Array $columns)
    {
       return User::select($columns);
    }

What you seem to be looking for is an ORM. No reason your Repository can't be based around one. This would require User extend eloquent, but I personally don't see that as a problem.

If you do however want to avoid an ORM, you would then have to "roll your own" to get what you're looking for.

#3

Interfaces aren't supposed be hard and fast requirements. Something can implement an interface and add to it. What it can't do is fail to implement a required function of that interface. You can also extend interfaces like classes to keep things DRY.

That said, I'm just starting to get a grasp, but these realizations have helped me.

share|improve this answer
    
What I dislike about this method is that if you had a MongoUserRepository, that and your DbUserRepository would return different objects. Db returning an Eloquent\Model, and Mongo something of its own. Surely a better implementation is to have both repositories return instances/collections of a separate Entity\User class. This way you aren't mistakingly rely on Eloquent\Model's DB methods when you switch to using the MongoRepository –  danharper Apr 26 '13 at 10:12
    
I'd definitely agree with you on that one. What I would probably do to avoid that is never use those methods outside of the Eloquent requiring class. So the get function probably should be private and only used within the class as it, as you pointed out, would return something that other repositories couldn't. –  WMeldon Apr 26 '13 at 13:18

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