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I have this simple class

class foo {
public:
  void func() const;
  void func2();
};

void foo::func() const {}
void foo::func2() {}

int main() {
  const foo f;
  f.func();
  f.func2();
}

When I attempt to compile I get this message:

error: passing ‘const foo’ as ‘this’ argument of ‘void foo::func2()’ discards qualifiers [-fpermissive]

I understand the use of a non-const member of a const object, my question is how is the 'this' pointer used as an argument to func2?

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Change const foo f; to foo f, and "f.func2()" should compile fine. Otherwise, changing func2() to "const" should also resolve the problem. Either way, any time you call an object's method, you're passing a "this" pointer. Since you declared object f "const", and since func2() is non-const ... the compiler is complaining. –  paulsm4 Apr 23 '13 at 20:02

7 Answers 7

void foo::func2() is non const, which means that it may change the object. Thus the compiler doesn't allow you to call it for a const object. Even if you don't actually change anything in func2's implementation. this is implicit argument for any non static member function. That is how it knows what exact object it was called for.

9.3.2 The this pointer [class.this]

1 In the body of a non-static (9.3) member function, the keyword this is a prvalue expression whose value is the address of the object for which the function is called.

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Yeah, I got that part. What interests me is that the compiler message refers to the 'this' pointer as an argument to func2. I'm trying to figure out what it means by that. Is 'this' an implicit argument to a member function? –  Richard Johnson Apr 23 '13 at 20:02
    
@RichardJohnson this is implicit argument for any non static member function. That is how it knows what exact object it was called for –  alexrider Apr 23 '13 at 20:03

You're seeing an artifact of the way C++ is defined. Member functions automatically add a hidden this parameter to every function. If the object is const then the pointer is const as well, and a non-const member function must receive a non-const this pointer.

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1  
Minor clarification just for the record - non-static member functions get a hidden this - static member functions don't. –  twalberg Apr 23 '13 at 20:06
    
@twalberg, of course - I should have mentioned that. Thanks. –  Mark Ransom Apr 23 '13 at 20:08

The instance argument for member functions is implicit. That is, it is never part of the function declaration, but it is nonetheless there.

Remember that (non-static) member functions are not functions. You cannot just call them. Instead, you must always invoke them on an instance object. This instance object is implicitly an argument of the member function, but never spelled out. It is available inside the function via the this expression.

If the implicit instance argument binds to a constant object, then the type of this is T const *, and only member functions which are qualified as const may be called. Similarly for volatile, and there is also a similar rule for binding the implicit instance argument to an rvalue reference.

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You cannot call non-const function func2 on a const object f.

Since your question is:

how is the this pointer used as an argument to func2

here is some information quoted from IBM C++ documentation: this pointer:

The keyword this identifies a special type of pointer. Suppose that you create an object named x of class A, and class A has a nonstatic member function f(). If you call the function x.f(), the keyword this in the body of f() stores the address of x. You cannot declare the this pointer or make assignments to it.

A static member function does not have a this pointer.

The type of the this pointer for a member function of a class type X, is X* const. If the member function is declared with the const qualifier, the type of the this pointer for that member function for class X, is const X* const.

A const this pointer can by used only with const member functions. Data members of the class will be constant within that function. The function is still able to change the value, but requires a const_cast to do so:

void foo::p() const{    
    member = 1;                       // illegal    
    const_cast <int&> (member) = 1;   // a bad practice but legal 
} 

A better technique would be to declare member mutable

.

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In OOP (generally), all instance methods are silently converted to static functions by the compiler, and a pointer to a struct that constaints instance-state (i.e. this) is added as a hidden first parameter.

So this:

class Foo
{
    private:
        Int32 _bar;

    public:
        void Add(Int32 x)
        {
            this->_bar += x;
        }
};

void Main()
{
    Foo foo;
    foo.Add(3);
}

Is actually implemented like this:

struct Foo {
    Int32 _bar;
}

static void Foo_Add(Foo *thisPtr, Int32 x)
{
    thisPtr->_bar += x;
}

void Main()
{
    Foo foo;
    Foo_Add( &foo, 3 );
}
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So the error is really just a simple type mismatch because its not allowed to implicitly convert a const object to a non-const object. –  Richard Johnson Apr 23 '13 at 20:32

your member function func2() should be const. see here.

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In the actual code as run on the computer, the code for func2 needs to know which instance of foo to look at/do things to. So it is passed a pointer (this) to the instance.

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