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I have a datatype I would like to serialize to JSON. The datatype contains a set of integers. It will be a pain to work with anything other than JSON (e.g., YAML) because of other constraints in the project, and I really want O(1) lookups.

It has occurred to me that I could perform a filthy little hack here and just use a JSON object, with dummies for the values in each key/value pair:

{"1": null, "45": null, "-93": null}

But I see no precedent for this in a brief online search. Okay, it's hideous, and yes it's wasting memory, but it seems to give what I want without having to write some silly wrapper. The fact that I don't immediately don't encounter this when I search makes me suspicious that I am missing something.

And so, other than the hideousness and memory stupidity I mention above, are there other reasons to avoid this? (I am, of course, taking it for granted that the underlying implementation for the object type in the target language(s) has an O(1) check for keys).

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Can't you just copy back and forth to an array on serialize/deserialize? Presumably your set (you don't say what language) can produce an array of entries, and you can create a new set from an array. – Hot Licks Apr 23 '13 at 21:38
    
I absolutely can do this, but it requires some wrapper code, which I'd like to avoid. I am aware of the pros of this approach. I'm wondering about cons of the approach I mention above (other than the ones I mention above). – charleslparker Apr 24 '13 at 15:21
up vote 1 down vote accepted

JSON is a "lightweight data-interchange format" not a query data structure. If you are transferring a lot of data, a simple array of numbers would take up a lot less space that the JSON you mentioned above. Then you can transform it into whatever data structure you need afterwards and it doesn't need to conform to the JSON spec. The time to transfer a larger file using your key/value pair format is probably much more than the time to convert the structure afterwards.

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Good answer. The O(n) transfer speed penalty is something I'm not considering above. – charleslparker Apr 26 '13 at 15:35

Using an object as a set seems completely reasonable given the lack of another set datatype. Were I you I would use the object method you propose without guilt.

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A fair opinion. Thank you. – charleslparker May 20 '13 at 21:01

You could put them in a sorted array and use this underscore.js function to do binary search: http://underscorejs.org/#indexOf

Example:

var array = [1, 45, -93, 20, 17];
var sorted = array.sort();

alert(_.indexOf(sorted, 17, true) >= 0)
alert(_.indexOf(sorted, 18, true) >= 0)

You can also do your original idea, but you don't need to write it as JSON. You don't need to use strings as keys, you can just use the numbers as keys. I don't know which way is faster.

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This is probably an appropriate solution for a lot of people in my situation, but what I'm wondering about is the cons of the approach I describe above. The correct answer might be "The only downside of the approach above is that which you've already mentioned", but I don't know. Incidentally, the current JSON spec doesn't allow numbers as keys in objects: json.org. – charleslparker Apr 24 '13 at 15:23
1  
JSON is a "lightweight data-interchange format" not a query data structure. If you are transferring a lot of data, a simple array of numbers would take up a lot less space that the JSON you mentioned above. Then you can transform it into whatever data structure you need afterwards and it doesn't need to conform to the JSON spec. The time to transfer larger file using your key/value pair format is probably much more than the time to convert the structure afterwards. – Rn222 Apr 25 '13 at 17:30
    
Ah ha. That is an excellent point. Let me rephrase: If I'm using JSON to transfer the data over a network (and I am), then I'm incurring an extra O(n) transmission cost with the dummy values. This is probably a huge extra cost compared to the pass over an array to create a set. It's not just memory stupidity, it's speed stupidity as well. I am convinced. If you want to make your comment above a standalone answer, I'll mark it as correct. – charleslparker Apr 26 '13 at 15:01

One thing I hadn't thought of while writing this question is the expense of converting the number to a string and probably hashing it at lookup time. This is still O(1) in the size of the set, of course, but I think that n will have to be fairly large before all of those string operations add up to some thing less than an O(log(n)) binary search over an integer array.

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