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Overly simplified, contrived question

I have an enumerable instance which can contain a series of contiguous elements, and the some other elements interdispersed with them. A simple example

var items = new[]
            {"1","1","1","1","1","varX","1","1","1","1","varY","1","1"};

As you can see, the string 1 is repeated and then every now and again there is something else (very recognisable). Lets say that I want to aggregate in a way that forms the enumerable

var aggregated = new[]
          { "11111", "varX", "1111", "varY","11"};

Which is obviously just "all the 1's concatenated" followed by the "var" followed by the next set of 1's concatenated. etc.

Dont get too hung up on the string details; Think of the "1" as instances of object Word and "var" as instances of object Variable. Now I want to concatenate the Word's together (to make a sentence) and deal with the Variable's differently

How would I go about writing that aggregation, using LINQ, or just plain ol' fashioned foreach?

Slightly simplified, same question

I have an enumerable list of "Tokens". There is only 2 types of token, both inherit from a base Token:

public abstract class Token{}
public class WordToken : Token {}
public class VariableToken : Token {}

The string:

Hello world {varX} how are you {varY} bye

Would be Tokenized by my code to the following enumerable

  var tokens = new[]
    { 
       WordToken, 
       WordToken, 
       VariableToken,  
       WordToken,  
       WordToken,  
       WordToken,  
       VariableToken,  
       WordToken
    };

I wish to turn that to

var newList = new [] 
    {
       FragmentToken, 
       VariableToken,  
       FragmentToken,  
       VariableToken,  
       FragmentToken
     };

Where FragmentToken is all the Words just concatenated together

An obvious first step is to aggregate the original list to make

var step = new[]
    { 
          new[]{WordToken, WordToken}, 
          new[]{VariableToken},
          new[]{ WordToken, WordToken, WordToken}, 
          new[]{VariableToken}, 
          new[]{WordToken}
    };

I could then do the next step easily, but I cant fathom how to get to this first step.

share|improve this question
    
looks like a strange form of zipping operation to me. Will all the repeated characters ALWAYS be a single character, or are we also looking to block together larger sets. Example would varX varX varX ever be something present in the set, needing to be shrunk down to a single entry? If so, that will complicate things... –  Nevyn Apr 23 '13 at 20:54
    
@Nevyn - Aha, you've hit upon what I thought might happen with this simplified example:so ive updated the question to indicate why you shouldnt get caught up with the details of "strings" –  Jamiec Apr 23 '13 at 20:58
    
makes sense. So we are looking at types, which may be anything, and need to be replaced with collections of those types? All of which still needs to be bound by a larger collection into a single instance? –  Nevyn Apr 23 '13 at 21:07
    
A collection of those types would be fine, yes. At the end of the day, im quite lierally concatenating the Words with a space to make a sentence! –  Jamiec Apr 23 '13 at 21:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is this close to the solution you want?

public abstract class Token : IComparable
{
    public int CompareTo(object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null)
        {
            return -1;
        }
        return GetType().FullName.CompareTo(obj.GetType().FullName);
    }
}
public class WordToken : Token { }
public class VariableToken : Token { }

public static class ListExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<TEntity>> JoinRepeatedValues<TEntity>(this IEnumerable<TEntity> collection)
        where TEntity : IComparable
    {
        var joinedRepeatedValuesCollection = new List<List<TEntity>>();
        var lastValue = default(TEntity);
        foreach (var item in collection)
        {
            if (item.CompareTo(lastValue) != 0)
            {
                joinedRepeatedValuesCollection.Add(new List<TEntity> { item });
            }
            else
            {
                var lastAddedValue = joinedRepeatedValuesCollection.Last();
                lastAddedValue.Add(item);
            }
            lastValue = item;
        }
        return joinedRepeatedValuesCollection;
    }

}
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var tokens = new Token[]
                            {
                                new WordToken(),
                                new WordToken(),
                                new VariableToken(),
                                new WordToken(),
                                new WordToken(),
                                new WordToken(),
                                new VariableToken(),
                                new WordToken()
                            };

        var joinedValues = tokens.JoinRepeatedValues();
        var items = new[] { "1", "1", "1", "1", "1", "varX", "1", "1", "1", "1", "varY", "1", "1" }.JoinRepeatedValues();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think that pretty much pointed me in the right direction for now. Thanks –  Jamiec Apr 23 '13 at 22:28
    
pretty much the same algorithm I came up with, but a much prettier use of Linq and Extensions, also, more specific to the solution...but that's what having more information to design with gets you :-). I like it :-) –  Nevyn Apr 24 '13 at 15:11

Well, here's an attempt at it based on my understanding of the issue

var initialList;//whatever this contains...

List<List<Object>> retList = new List<List<Object>>();

Type storedType = null;

foreach(Object thing in initialList)
{//we treat this like a simple array of objects, because we DONT know what's in it.
    if(storedType != null)
    {
        if(storedType.Equals(thing.GetType())
            instanceList.Add(thing);
        else
        {//add instanceList to the master return, then re-set stored type and the 
         //list and add the current thing to the new list
            retList.Add(instanceList);
            storedType = thing.GetType();
            instanceList = new List<Object>();
            instanceList.Add(thing);
        }
    }
    else
    {//should be First run only
        storedType = thing.GetType();
        instanceList.Add(thing);
    }
}
return retList;

Added note:

If all the objects are supposed to be the same Type then instead of checking type, check and store the value, but the basic algorithm remains the same. Also, you can use the exact type of the contents instead of Object, which is rather necessary if you are checking values anyway..

===========================================

Dont know how to do this with linq while still maintaining the current item order. if that's not important, Linq's OfType<> method would be the way to go, filter the list based on types. Unfortunately, you can't use variables in the type specification for that, so you would need to know ahead of time a strict list of all the types that MIGHT be in the initialList.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, but see the update - there is only ever 2 types of object in the list; concatenates and dont-concatenates. Word and Variable. –  Jamiec Apr 23 '13 at 21:32
    
Well, there's proof that more information gets you a more specific and informative answer :-). Glad I could help at least, even if it wasn't the end product you were looking for. –  Nevyn Apr 24 '13 at 15:08

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