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I have the following code:

//update it in the map
      std::map<std::string, std::string>::iterator it;
      for(it = spreadsheets.at(i).cells.begin(); it != spreadsheets.at(i).cells.end(); ++it)
      {
        if(it->first == change.first)
        {
          if(change.second == "")
          {
            spreadsheets.at(i).cells.erase(change.first);
          }
          else
          {
          it->second = change.second;
          }
        }
      }

The code above runs perfectly on my mac however when I run in on a linux computer it throws a seg fault on spreadsheets.at(i).cells.erase(change.first);

Any idea whats causing this error? Ive tried changing erase(change.first) to erase(it) and I am still getting the seg fault.

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@zeta yes it is –  Deekor Apr 23 '13 at 20:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From the documentation of std::map::erase:

References and iterators to the erased elements are invalidated. Other references and iterators are not affected.

Still your loop goes on and you increment your (now invalid) iterator.

Fix: increment your iterator another way, eg.:

std::map<std::string, std::string>::iterator it;
for (it = spreadsheets.at(i).cells.begin(); it != spreadsheets.at(i).cells.end();/*NOTE: no increment here*/)
{
  if (it->first == change.first)
  {
    if (change.second == "")
    {
      it = spreadsheets.at(i).cells.erase(it); // C++11 only
      // in both C++03 and C++11:  spreadsheets.at(i).cells.erase(it++);
    }
    else
    {
      it->second = change.second;
      ++it;
    }
  }
  else
    ++it;
}

Or to avoid confusion because of the numerous execution paths (the very same confusion that made me forget the last else on my first try): just copy the iterator, increment the original one, and then use the copy. This may look overkill in your case but for more complex loops this is sometimes the only way to stay sane. ;)

std::map<std::string, std::string>::iterator it;
for (it = spreadsheets.at(i).cells.begin(); it != spreadsheets.at(i).cells.end();/*NOTE: no increment here*/)
{
  std::map<std::string, std::string>::iterator this_it = it++;
  if (this_it->first == change.first)
  {
    if (change.second == "")
    {
      spreadsheets.at(i).cells.erase(this_it);
    }
    else
    {
      this_it->second = change.second;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That fixed it, why was it working on the mac then? –  Deekor Apr 23 '13 at 20:56
1  
@Deekor: incrementing an invalidated iterator is Undefined Behaviour, which means basically "anything could happen" (it could even have the appearance of working, which is what happens on your Mac). –  syam Apr 23 '13 at 20:58
    
@Deekor: I updated my code, there was a path where I forgot to increment the iterator (the last else). Be sure to double-check it or you will have a bug. –  syam Apr 23 '13 at 21:01
    
@syam, in C++03 it's enough to simply put spreadsheets.at(i).cells.erase(it++); as post increment returns a copy of the iterator. –  W.B. Apr 23 '13 at 21:02
    
@W.B. Right, I'll fix that. Thanks! –  syam Apr 23 '13 at 21:04

Because when you erase from the container, your iterator is no longer valid, yet your loop continues.

You could change your loop to:

std::map<std::string, std::string>::iterator it = spreadsheets.at(i).cells.begin();
while (it != spreadsheets.at(i).cells.end())
{
  if(it->first == change.first)
  {
    if(change.second == "")
    {
      spreadsheets.at(i).cells.erase(it++);  //Post increment returns a copy pointing at the current element, while it already points to the next element and thus stays valid after erase
    }
    else
    {
      it->second = change.second;
      ++it;
    }
  }
  else
    ++it;
}

Now that I think of it, why do you erase with first element of the pair the iterator is pointing to, ie:

spreadsheets.at(i).cells.erase(change.first);

instead of

spreadsheets.at(i).cells.erase(it);

It's less efficient, as another lookup has to be made.

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After element being erased from map pointing to this element will become invalidated. Thus spreadsheets.at(i).cells.erase(change.first); renders it invalid. See Iterator Invalidation Rules

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At the moment you do spreadsheets.at(i).cells.erase(change.first); the iterator in the std::map (at the current change.first key) is invalidated. So, when you do it++, it is undefined behaviour.

cf Rules for Iterator Invalidation for rules about invalidation of iterators in standard containers

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Increment the iterator before you erase it. Why didn't it happen on the Mac? Who knows.. different OS, different behaviour.

SO

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