Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have four bool variables:

bool option1, option2,option3,option4;

I have a string list, it may contain "1" or "2" or "3" or "4". What I want is if the list contains "1", then

option1 = true;

if it contains "2" and "4", then

option2 = true;
option4 = true;

The question is that I want to use substring "option" concatenate the digit then apply the bool value. I don't want

if(list.Contain("1"))
  option1 = true;

Thanks for advice

share|improve this question
    
You can use the List<T>.Contains method: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bhkz42b3.aspx, you can also write a for loop with an array to prevent redundant code. –  Matthew Apr 23 '13 at 20:50
    
Are you asking if you can do something like "option" + list[0] = true;? –  Esoteric Screen Name Apr 23 '13 at 20:51
2  
Only way I can think of is to use Reflection and find the boolean Property that has "option" + list[0] as a name. –  Bob. Apr 23 '13 at 20:51
    
Why are you not using an Enum? –  Romoku Apr 23 '13 at 20:51
1  
you can also just use the contains method in the firstplace and forgo the variables –  Sam I am Apr 23 '13 at 20:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since the OP wants with Reflection, I'll provide a Reflection answer, personally I like keyboardP's answer best.

// Property
public bool Option1 { get; set; }

// Below is inside Main, or a method
// Set Option to true, for value to retrieve
Option1 = true;
// List of values
List<string> MyList = new List<string>() { "1", "2" };

foreach(string optionValue in MyList) {
    // Attempt to retrieve PropertyInfo with the given option and value
    PropertyInfo newPI = this.GetType().GetProperty("Option" + optionValue);
    if(newPI != null) {
        object value = newPI.GetValue(this, null);
        newPI.SetValue(this, false);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You could do something like this if you really want to take the approach you're asking (although there may be better alternatives if you can accept other methods).

Dictionary<string, bool> dict = new Dictionary<string, bool>();
//assuming you've initialized options 1 - 4 bools
dict.Add("option1", option1);
dict.Add("option2", option2);
dict.Add("option3", option3);
dict.Add("option4", option4);

string num = "1";
if(list.Contains(num))
{
   if(dict.ContainsKey("option" + num))
      dict["option" + num] = true;
}
share|improve this answer

I would use a bool array for this:

var myList = new List<string>() { "1", "3" };   // example list of strings

bool[] options = new bool[4];
foreach (var i in myList.Select(n => int.Parse(n)))
{
    options[i-1] = true;
}
share|improve this answer

This looks more like Flags.

See enums in C# - assignment and Enum Flags Attribute

[Flags]
public enum Values
{
    None = 0,
    Option1 = 1 << 0, // 1
    Option2 = 1 << 1, // 2
    Option3 = 1 << 2, // 4
    Option4 = 1 << 3 // 8
}

var values = Values.Option3 | Values.Option2;

bool option1Set = (values & Values.Option1) == Values.Option1; // false
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. I like Orion Edwards' bit-shifting Flags personally - don't have to calculate yourself (and thus should allow for easier consistency). –  zimdanen Apr 23 '13 at 21:07
    
I haven't seen that one before. Nice. –  Romoku Apr 23 '13 at 21:08

Alternative suggestion:

bool[] options = new bool[4];

.. and ...

options[optionNumber - 1] = list.Contains(optionNumber)
share|improve this answer

Start with the notation you want to use and work backwards from there. How about something like

class MySettings
{
  private List<string> backingStore ;

  public bool Option1 { get { return backingStore.Contains("1") ; } }
  public bool Option2 { get { return backingStore.Contains("2") ; } }
  public bool Option3 { get { return backingStore.Contains("3") ; } }
  public bool Option4 { get { return backingStore.Contains("4") ; } }

  public MySettings( List<string> settings )
  {
      this.backingStore = settings ;
  }

}

Alternatively, use a dictionary, something like:

List<string> settings = GetSettings() ;
Dictionary<int,bool> = Enumerable
                       .Range(1,4)
                       .ToDictionary(
                          x => x ,
                          x => settings.Contains(x.ToString())
                          ) ;

More idiomatic, more amenable to later extension.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.