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not sure this is the right place for the question, but the people on the forum have been helpful in the past...

I am having trouble with the following question:

what is the cardinality of the following set:

M = {(x,y) ∈ RxR | 2x+y ∈ N AND x-2y ∈ N} R= real numbers, N= Natural numbers.

I am pretty confident the answer is that M is a countable set, but I need to prove that. thats where I am stumped. The hint was to mark 2x+y=n, and x-2y=m, and then solve those two equations. Any help would be appreciated.

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closed as off topic by DSM, Paul R, templatetypedef, Alfabravo, arshajii Apr 23 '13 at 22:34

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I think the people at math.stackexchange.com would be even more helpful. :^) –  DSM Apr 23 '13 at 21:51
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The question is highly off-topic here, but I'll try...

Let:

n := 2x+y
m := x-2y

Then (solve the equations):

x = (m+2n)/5
y = (n-2m)/5

The definition of the set can thus be rewritten as follows:

M = {(  (m+2n)/5, (n-2m)/5  )  |  n ∈ ℕ AND m ∈ ℕ} 

This set is obviously isomorphic to ℕ². ℕ² is countable (I assume you've had this in your class), so the set M is also countable (actually, M is countably infinite).
q.e.d.


P.S. you can bring some effort and provide the definition of the isomorphism between M and ℕ² (that's now really easy).

P.P.S. try out http://math.stackexchange.com as suggested by DSM.

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