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Why do I have to explicitly cast command to C in the following code? Commands implements both Runnable and Describable.

@Test
public <C extends Runnable & Describable> void testMapOfCommands() throws Exception
{
    Map<String, C> commands = Maps.newHashMap();
    for(Commands command : Commands.values())
    {
        commands.put(command.name(), (C) command);
    }
    //Use commands here (not relevant to my question):
    //CommandLineParser.withCommands(commands).parse("commit");
}

private enum Commands implements Runnable, Describable
{
    commit
    {
        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            System.out.println("COMMIT");
        }

        @Override
        public String description()
        {
            return "Commits something";
        }
    };
}

One workaround I have in mind is to introduce ICommand that extends both Runnable and Describable:

public interface ICommand extends Runnable, Describable{}

but I'm trying to avoid having to introduce a new type when there already is two types readily available and I already have a Command class that's a bit more complex. Am I grasping for straws here?

share|improve this question
    
They are interfaces – jontejj Apr 23 '13 at 22:03
    
First, please post the entire class. Second, you need to use implements, not extends, for interfaces like Runnable. – Antimony Apr 23 '13 at 22:04
    
Updated the code a bit, I think all relevant code is posted. What parts are you missing? – jontejj Apr 23 '13 at 22:07
2  
@Antimony: nope. In generic types, extends is used. Not implements. Even with interfaces. – JB Nizet Apr 23 '13 at 22:07
2  
Given your code, you'll get a ClassCastException if you ever invoke the generic method with any generic type other than Commands. If I create a class Foo that implements both interfaces, and call yourObject.<Foo>testMapOfCommands(), it won't work. I don't understand why your method is generic, especially if it's a unit test method. – JB Nizet Apr 23 '13 at 22:11
up vote 6 down vote accepted

What you have is a command object that is of type Commands. But because of your generic type declaration <C extends Runnable & Describable>, Java expects C to be both Describable and Runnable, but C is not necessariy a Commands.

This particular test method isn't meant to work with anything but Commands, so it should not be generic. This should work:

public void testMapOfCommands() throws Exception
{
    Map<String, Commands> commands = new HashMap<String, Commands>();
    for(Commands command : Commands.values())
    {
        commands.put(command.name(), command);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Exactly my comment :-) – JB Nizet Apr 23 '13 at 22:12
    
this worked! thanks. I would however appreciate it if I could understand why the compiler can't cast Commands to a Runnable & Describable. My code worked as well, just that it was a bit weird with the (C)command cast. – jontejj Apr 23 '13 at 22:17
    
The Java compiler thinks that C could be anything that implements both Runnable and Describable, even if it's a Commands2, that happens to be both Describable and Runnable too. So it disallows the parameter of type Commands, because you shouldn't be able to put a Commands into something that could be a HashMap<String, Commands2> (even if we know it really isn't). – rgettman Apr 23 '13 at 22:20
    
Aah, so it's because the compiler can't figure out that I only want the Runnable & Describable part of Commands. – jontejj Apr 23 '13 at 22:23
2  
Java's type system really isn't strong enough to do much messing around with "intersection types" like that. – Louis Wasserman Apr 23 '13 at 23:46

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