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I have a piece of code that Resharper tells me has unused variables, but the variables are definitely used. The variables are used in a Databind() and the fields to bind are specified as strings. Since the field names are accessed using the string variable, Resharper doesn't think they are being used.

In the following code sample Resharper tells me to change the public variable to private. After doing that it tells me that the variable is unused and can be removed. Both of these suggestions are wrong as the variable is used and must be public.

I don't like that Resharper warns me about this and is yellow. I would like to check in my code green. I know I can ignore this using the option to suppress with a comment but in the past I have never had to use this option and was able to find other solutions to get my code green. In this case I have not been able to find another way. Does anyone know how I can get Resharper to recognize that this variable is being used?

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

public partial class TestCode_General_ResharperTest : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    private class TestClass
    {
        public TestClass(string name, string id)
        {
            ID = id;
            Name = name;
        }

        public string ID;  /*Resharper says this can be made private*/
        public string Name; /*Resharper says this can be made private*/
    }

    protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (!Page.IsPostBack)
        {
            DropDownList testList = new DropDownList();
            ArrayList groups = getTestList();
            testList.DataSource = groups;
            testList.DataValueField = "ID";
            testList.DataTextField = "Name";
            testList.DataBind();    /* Databind causes the public variables to be accessed.*/
        }
    }

    private static ArrayList getTestList()
    {
        ArrayList groupInfo = new ArrayList();
        string[] pairs = new[] { "Test:1", "Test 2:2", "Test 3:3" };
        foreach (string pair in pairs)
        {
            string[] values = pair.Split(new[] { ':' });
            groupInfo.Add(new TestClass(values[0], values[1]));
        }
        return groupInfo;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I would suggest using List<TestClass> instead of the deprecated ArrayList class. That way, ReSharper will at least have some home of knowing what you're trying to do. –  John Saunders Apr 23 '13 at 23:32
    
I mention the comment option in the question and may have to resort to that as my last option. I modified my code to use the List<TestClass> and it had no affect on the Resharper warnings. –  RacerNerd Apr 23 '13 at 23:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you have 3 options:

  1. Use an anonymous class, as you are not using strong typing here anyway.
  2. Suppress warning with comment, and add comment explaining why.
  3. Add ReSharper's [UsedImplicitly] attribute, and add comment explaining why (not sure if this one works with fields though).

Example with option 1:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

public partial class TestCode_General_ResharperTest : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    protected override void OnLoad(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnLoad(e);
        if (Page.IsPostBack)
            return;

        var testList = new DropDownList();
        testList.DataSource = GetTestListData();
        testList.DataValueField = "ID";
        testList.DataTextField = "Name";
        testList.DataBind();    /* Databind causes the public variables to be accessed.*/
    }

    private static IEnumerable<object> GetTestListData()
    {
        var groups = new List<object>();
        var pairs = new[] { "Test:1", "Test 2:2", "Test 3:3" };
        foreach (var pair in pairs)
        {
            var values = pair.Split(new[] { ':' });
            groups.Add(new { ID = values[0], Name = values[1] });
        }
        return groups;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I second [UsedImplicitly] advice –  Dmitry Osinovskiy Apr 24 '13 at 12:26
    
My opinion is that anonymous type is best and least verbose in this context — it will be only read through reflection anyway. ArrayList gives a hint as well (could have been List<object>) — items are never downcast. –  Andrey Shchekin Apr 24 '13 at 23:35
    
Good work Andrey. The anonymous type allowed me to get rid of both the Resharper suggestion and extra code. This is a nice solution. Thanks. –  RacerNerd Apr 26 '13 at 18:32

Resharper can't know that the DataBind method on the DropDownList will need to access those fields/properties. If you want to remove the warning, you can make them properties and then create your TestClass as others have mentioned or you can suppress them with a comment.

I see this day in, day out in my job. Developers are hell bent on making Resharper happy and get OCD over the little squiggly lines and warnings when they should be realising that Resharper is there to make suggestions that they can review and then choose to ignore if their code makes sense.

share|improve this answer

Try making them properties

private class TestClass
{
    public TestClass(string name, string id)
    {
        ID = id;
        Name = name;
    }

    public string ID { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
My code started out looking exactly like this but I simplified it for the purpose of the example. When I do this Resharper tells me that the get; accessor is not used and that the public string can be made private. –  RacerNerd Apr 23 '13 at 23:25

ReSharper can't know that some fields are used only via reflection.

Consider making them properties instead of public fields.

share|improve this answer
2  
In fact, making them properties won't help. ReSharper simply doesn't know about things accessed through reflection. I'm pretty sure it doesn't understand databinding expressions, either. –  John Saunders Apr 23 '13 at 23:34

Make them properties as shown below

private class TestClass
    {
        public TestClass()
        {

        }

        public string ID{get;set;}
        public string Name{get;set;}
    }

and use it like

 groupInfo.Add(new TestClass{ID=values[0], Name= values[1]});
share|improve this answer
    
This is a very good suggestion as it forces Resharper to see that the variables are assigned. It still complains about the get; accessor not being used even though it is used in the Databind(). So this gets me pretty close, but not to that green box. –  RacerNerd Apr 23 '13 at 23:31
2  
So why do you care about Resharper? If you want, tell to the resharper guys that. But what you are doing is not wrong. :). I mean you are not trying to make resharper happy. Resharper does other craps too like change for loop to foreach and when you change it ,it will ask you to change it back to for . Dont worry man –  Dan Hunex Apr 23 '13 at 23:34
    
I like that thought Dan. I can't explain why I care about it if I know the code is okay. Green just makes me happy for some silly reason. You have keyed in on a little bit of crazy. I need to go simmer on that for awhile. –  RacerNerd Apr 23 '13 at 23:41

I don't see where you're using ID or Name anywhere in the class. Assigning it in the constructor doesn't count, btw which is probably why it's complaining.

Resharper is Erring to the side of caution by recommending that the variable be private because you don't use it anywhere else; Since you didn't define any getters or setters, it is probably assuming that you are using those variables to internally track state.

share|improve this answer

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