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I have an exercise about ptrace and pipes. The following code is a part from whole program. Pipes are made before main part and this_trace.s_out is 1. Main father create child and this child makes his own child for stdout. When program runs ls then it is print on screen and doesn't write in file. What is wrong?

if(pid == 0)
{
char buf0[BUFFSIZE], buf1[BUFFSIZE], buf2[BUFFSIZE];
int length0, length1, length2;


if(this_trace.s_out == 1)   //For stdout redirection
{
    if((pid1=fork()) == -1)
    {
        perror("fork");
        exit(1); 
    }

    if(pid1 == 0) //child for stdout redirect
    {//sleep(2);
        if(fd1 = open(this_trace.out_name,O_WRONLY | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC, 0666) == -1)
        {
            perror("create stdout file");
            exit(1);
        }


        close(p_out[WRITE]);
        close(p_in[READ]);
        close(p_in[WRITE]);
        close(p_err[READ]);
        close(p_err[WRITE]);

        do{
            if((length1 = read(p_out[READ],buf1,BUFFSIZE)) == -1)
            {
                perror("Read for stdout redirection");
                exit(1);
            }
            write(fd1, buf1, length1);
        }while(length1 > 0);


        close(fd1);
        //close(p_out[READ]);
        return 0;
        //break;

    }
    else if(pid1 > 0)//child from main father
    {
        close(p_out[READ]);
        close(p_in[READ]);
        close(p_in[WRITE]);
        close(p_err[READ]);
        close(p_err[WRITE]);

        dup2(p_out[WRITE], 1);
    }

}




ptrace(PTRACE_TRACEME, 0, NULL, NULL);  


//execv(argv[1],NULL);
execl("/bin/ls","ls",NULL);


}

Sorry for my bad English.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It is not clear why you have so many processes. You have a problem at:

if (fd1 = open(this_trace.out_name,O_WRONLY | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC, 0666) == -1)

This assigns 0 or 1 to fd1, regardless of the file descriptor opened. It should be:

if ((fd1 = open(this_trace.out_name,O_WRONLY | O_CREAT | O_TRUNC, 0666)) == -1)

After you use dup2() (or dup()) to redirect a file descriptor to a standard channel, you should close the original file descriptor. Thus, after dup2(p_out[WRITE], 1); you need close(p_out[WRITE]);.

You should detect failure from execl() and deal with it; if the execl() returns, it failed.

You show unused variables buf0 and buf2 (and corresponding length0 and length2).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. After a lot of time some things are difficult to see them. Some of variables are for other redirection. The reason for so many processes is the professor who give us the exercise –  pagratios Apr 24 '13 at 1:00
    
I have just done your changes and everything works fine. Thank you again –  pagratios Apr 24 '13 at 1:14
    
For stdin I did this but the program never end without ctrl-c do { if((length0 = read(fd0,buf0,BUFFSIZE)) == -1) { perror("Read for stdin redirection"); exit(1); } write(p_in[WRITE], buf0, length0); }while(length0 > 0); –  pagratios Apr 24 '13 at 1:41
    
Well, you should avoid do ... while (...) loops whenever possible. I'd certainly want to write: while ((length0 = read(fd0, buf0, sizeof(buf0))) > 0) write(p_in[WRITE], buf0, length0); possibly checking that the write() was successful. Without your complete program, though, I can only guess what you're up to. The primary thing you need to do is ensure that all processes close all the stray ends of all the pipes. Very often, a never-ending loop like this is because some process in the list has the other end of the input pipe open for writing (that might be the current process). –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 24 '13 at 6:32

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