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I have been searching for several hours, but still can't seem to wrap my head around this. I don't understand how I'm meant to populate these in a normalized fashion.

Problem 1-

+----+------+------------+-------------+----------+------+------------+--------------+-----------------+-----+-------+----------+-------------+--------+--------+------------+-----------------+---------------+---------+----------+----------+--------+----------+---------+--------+-------+------+--------+---------+
| id | year | wholesaler | design_line | style_no | size | size_range | retail_price | wholesale_price | hue | color | illusion | iridescence | fabric | length | silhouette | bodice_cut_outs | back_cut_outs | closing | neckline | shoulder | sleeve | feathers | sequins | stones | beads | lace | ruches | updated |

^gown

I have created separate tables for many of these columns. Such as,

+----+--------+
| id | type   |
+----+--------+
|  1 | no     |
|  2 | zipper |
|  3 | corset |
+----+--------+

^closing_flag

I want the only possible options for gown.closing to be the values of closing_flag.type. Is it improper to use a separate table for normalization if it only has two columns?


Problem 2- I have other columns, such as hue, for which I want to be able to populate with multiple values -- for a gown with multiple hues on it, not for a gown style that is available in multiple hues. So, I created

+----+---------+
| id | hue     |
+----+---------+
|  1 | yellow  |
|  2 | green   |
|  3 | blue    |
|  4 | violet  |
|  5 | fuschia |
|  6 | red     |
|  7 | orange  |
|  8 | brown   |
|  9 | black   |
| 10 | grey    |
| 11 | white   |
| 12 | print   |
+----+---------+

^hue_flag

But, how can I INSERT multiple values from hue_flag into gown?


Problem 3- I have multiple columns in gown that should have the same possible values. feathers, sequins, stones, beads, lace, and ruches are all columns that should contain a value describing their amount of coverage. So, I created

+----+---------+
| id | amount  |
+----+---------+
|  1 | no      |
|  2 | few     |
|  3 | some    |
|  4 | many    |
|  5 | totally |
+----+---------+

^coverage_flag

How can I use the same value possibilities for multiple columns in another table? And again, is it weird to have a table with only two columns? Have I missed the point for normalization? I'm trying to be as conventional as possible, but it seems like I'll end up using more space this way than by simply having the values stored two tables, user and gown.

Of course, I don't expect someone to hit all of the points I've brought up. I just want to be thorough in explaining my problems. Believe me there are others, but they all fall into one of these three types. I've poured over [enter link description here][this] and other similar articles, but can make heads nor tails of how to practically apply the concepts.

Edited for readability.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Re problem 1: I would use a closing_type_id column in your gown table. That way, you can tell the database to ensure that there are no gowns with a non-existent closing_type, and, when renaming a closing_type, you only need to change it in one place.

I don't think there's anything wrong with a table having only two columns, either.

Also -- does it make sense to have a closing_type of none? Maybe if a gown doesn't have a closing_type, it would make more sense to give it a closing_type_id of 0?

Re problem 2: You should use another table, perhaps gown_hues, having columns gown_id and hue_id. Then you can have one row in that table for each colour for each gown. Set it up so that you can then retrieve all the hues associated with a particular gown by doing SELECT * FROM gown_hues WHERE gown_id = $gown_id. A rule of thumb: There's nearly always a better way of doing it than trying to have a single field contain more than one value.

Problem 3: That seems reasonable. Do the columns in your gown table contain a string, or a coverage_flag's id? I would opt for the latter (since there's no duplicated information). Then just do the same in other tables -- any other entities which can be covered by stuff in varying degrees can contain a foreign key to your coverage_flag table.

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P1: Shouldn't the values be as readable as possible, though? To prevent confusion. Good point on "none." I was thinking of leaving 0 open as a check if something hadn't been filled in. But, if I use drop-down boxes my thinking is moot. Thanks. P2: Oh! I get it! Showdev said the same above, but I was stuck in the mindset that id needs to AUTO_INCREMENT. But, not in this case. But, this will lead to a huge table. If gowns has 5000, gown_hues will have 5000 +. Will I just have to accept this? –  Ken Hikage Apr 24 '13 at 2:23
    
P3:Currently they hold the same VARCHAR as coverage_flag. I did this to make it understandable. So, coverage_flag.id TINYINT is okay? –  Ken Hikage Apr 24 '13 at 2:26
    
"If gowns has 5000, gown_hues will have 5000+" -- you will just have to accept this. I wouldn't regard this as problem, though; if it's disk space you're worried about, bear in mind that each gown_hue row is very small. –  hdgarrood Apr 24 '13 at 9:20
    
"Shouldn't the values be as readable as possible, though? To prevent confusion." I would argue that doing a JOIN isn't very difficult, and that the benefit of not having these data duplicated everywhere outweighs the extra work in adding a JOIN clause to SQL statements. –  hdgarrood Apr 24 '13 at 9:25
    
Well, I'm less worried about disk space than I am bandwidth and processing time. But, I see your points. Okay, I'll try to implement this today. We'll see if W3 Schools can help me with the JOIN thing. Oh, one last quick question. I do this via php, right? Or is this something that should be done in the command window ahead of time? –  Ken Hikage Apr 24 '13 at 15:39

To answer your questions in order:

1) No, it's not a problem. Make gown.closing a Foreign Key dependant on closing.id

2) there are two ways off the top of my head. You can make a hue table with an Id, and a Gown_Hue link table that links Gown Id and Hue Id. or you can add GownId to the Hue table and make sure that it's not got a unique constraint. That way you're not inserting multiple values into Gown. If I was doing this, I'd use the first approach with the Link table.

3) Essentially this is the same answer as question two.

To give an example in psuedo-code, you would have 3 tables

table Gown
{
   id UniqueIdentifier primary Key
}

table Hue
{
   id UnqiueIdentifier primary key
   hueDescription ntext
}

table Gown_Hue_Link 
{
   gownId UniqueIdentifier foreignKey => Gown.id
   hueId UniqueIdentifier foreignKey => Hue.id
}

So to get the Hue for your gown:

SELECT g.Id, h.hueDescription
FROM Gown g
 INNER JOIN Gown_Hue_Link ghl on ghl.gownId = g.id
 INNER JOIN Hue h on ghl.hueId = h.Id
WHERE G.id = <gown id>

I prefer the above approach as it means you only need to have 1 hue which can be associated with many Gowns, but you can do this with two tables too:

table Gown
{
   id UniqueIdentifier primary Key
}

table Hue
{
   id UnqiueIdentifier primary key
   gownId UniqueIdentifier foreignKey => Gown.id
   hueDescription ntext
}

And:

SELECT g.Id, h.hueDescription
    FROM Gown g
     INNER JOIN Hue h on h.gownId = g.Id
    WHERE G.id = <gown id>
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Sounds like you're on the right track.

Problem 1: No, there's nothing wrong with using a table with only two columns.

Problem 2: You'll need an intermediate table to associate hues with gowns. Something like gown_hues with columns "gown_id" and "hue_id".

Problem 3: Yes, you can associate "coverages" in multiple tables using the same coverage table for values. Each table should contain a coverage_id that relates to a value in the coverage table.

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P1: Okay, thanks. And it's good form? P2: Wouldn't gown_hue require something like hue_id_1, hue_id_2, hue_id_3, which breaks from normalization? P3: So, do I JOIN these? Or would this be a PHP thing? –  Ken Hikage Apr 24 '13 at 0:57
    
1) Yes. 2) No, you would add a new row for every "gown to hue" reference. So, if a gown has two hues, it will have two rows in the gown_hues table. 3) You can join them in your query, similar to joining hues to gowns. Join the coverage table to any column that contains a coverage id. –  showdev Apr 24 '13 at 16:30

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