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I'm running windows 7 64-bit and VS2012. When including windows.h I'm getting around 130 errors or so. and of course can't compile the project.

Did a short google research and I saw some people recommending installing the SDK again. I reinstalled but to no avail.

Then I tried to replace the windows.h file with the same file from my friend's pc where it works, but still I get the errors.

Then I tried to replace the whole include folder :D, still get the same 130 errors.

I also made sure that the "allow language extension" option is enabled in the project settings.

Any ideas?


So, I've done some more researching. If I start a new project and compile:

#include <windows.h>

void main()
{

}

It compiles well. Then I included my 2 .h files and then the errors appear (I'll mention again: while not including windows.h my project compiles flawlessly).

My two .h files contain 2 classes.

NumSet.h:

#pragma once

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
#include <algorithm>

#define SIZE 5

using namespace std;

class NumSet
{
    private:
        int _arr[SIZE];
        int _numOfNumbers;

    public:
        NumSet(void);
        ~NumSet(void);

        int max();                      //returns a player's max number.

        bool insert(int newNum);
        int freeCells();
        bool replace(int index, int newNum);

        int min();

        float average();

        int biggerThan(int num);

        int smallerThan(int num);

        NumSet& operator+=(int num);

        NumSet& operator++();

        NumSet& operator--();

        bool operator==(const NumSet& src)const;

        NumSet operator=(const int * src);

        NumSet& operator=(const NumSet& src);

        bool del(int num);

        friend ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, NumSet& numset);

        friend istream& operator>>(istream& out, NumSet& numset);
};

NumSet.cpp:

#include "NumSet.h"

NumSet::NumSet(void)
{

    for (int i=0;i<SIZE;i++)            //generating 5 random numbers between 1-10 and storing them in the array.
    {

        _arr[i] = (rand()%10) +1;
    }

    std::sort(&_arr[0],&_arr[5]);     //sorting the numbers.

    _numOfNumbers = 5;
}

NumSet::~NumSet(void)
{
}

int NumSet::max()
{
    int max = 0;

    for (int i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        if (_arr[i]>max)
        {
            max = _arr[i];
        }
    }

    return max;
}

bool NumSet::insert(int newNum)
{
    if (freeCells()==0)
        return false;

    _arr[_numOfNumbers-1] = newNum;

    std::sort(&_arr[0],&_arr[5]);
}

int NumSet::freeCells()
{
    if (_numOfNumbers==SIZE)
        return 0;

    return (SIZE-_numOfNumbers);
}

bool NumSet::replace(int index, int newNum)
{
    if ((index<0 || index>SIZE) || (newNum<1 || newNum > 10))
        return false;

    _arr[index] = newNum;

    std::sort(&_arr[0],&_arr[5]);
}

int NumSet::min()
{
    int min = 11;

    for (int i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        if (_arr[i]<min)
        {
            min = _arr[i];
        }
    }

    return min;
}

float NumSet::average()
{
    int sum = 0;

    for (int i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        sum += _arr[i];
    }

    return ((float)sum/SIZE);
}

int NumSet::biggerThan(int num)
{
    int count = 0;

    for (int i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        if (_arr[i]>=num)
            count++;
    }

    return count;
}

int NumSet::smallerThan(int num)
{
    int count = 0;

    for (int i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        if (_arr[i]<num)
            count++;
    }

    return count;
}

NumSet& NumSet::operator+=(int num)
{
    this->insert(num);

    return *this;
}



NumSet& NumSet::operator++()
{
    for (int i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        _arr[i]++;

        if (_arr[i]==11)
        {
            _arr[i]= 1;
        }
    }

    return *this;
}

NumSet& NumSet::operator--()
{
    for (int i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        _arr[i]--;

        if (_arr[i]==0)
        {
            _arr[i]= 10;
        }
    }

    return *this;
}

bool NumSet::operator==(const NumSet& src)const
{
    if (_numOfNumbers != src._numOfNumbers)
        return false;

    for (int i =0;i<_numOfNumbers;i++)
    {
        if (_arr[i] == src._arr[i])
            continue;

        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    return true;
}

NumSet NumSet::operator=(const int *src)
{
    if (sizeof(src)>(sizeof(int)*SIZE))
        return *this;

    NumSet newSet;

    for (int i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        newSet._arr[i]= src[i];
    }

    return newSet;
}

NumSet& NumSet::operator=(const NumSet& src)
{
    for (int i=0;i<SIZE;i++)
    {
        _arr[i]=src._arr[i];
    }

    _numOfNumbers=5;

    return *this;
}

bool NumSet::del(int num)
{
    if (num>SIZE)
        return false;

    _arr[num]=11;                           //setting the number to be deleted to 11 (there's no another way that 11 can be present in the array).

    std::sort(&_arr[0],&_arr[5]);           //sorting the array so the number to be deleted is in the end.

    _numOfNumbers--;                        //reducing the number of numbers in the array by 1, so the number to be deleted (the last in the array) will be ignored.
}

ostream& operator<<(ostream& out, NumSet& numset)
{
    if (numset._numOfNumbers==0)
        cout << "\n\nEmpty NumSet." << endl;

    else
    {
        for (int i=0;i<numset._numOfNumbers;i++)
        {
            cout << numset._arr[i] << " ";
        }
    }

    return out;
}

istream& operator>>(istream& in, NumSet& numset)
{

    for (int i=0;i<numset._numOfNumbers;i++)
    {
        cout << "\n\nEnter your #" << i+1 << " number:" << endl;
        int newnum;
        cin >> newnum;
        numset.replace(i, newnum);
    }

    return in;
}

game.h:

#pragma once

#include "NumSet.h"


using namespace std;

class Game
{
    private:
        NumSet *player1, *player2;

        void humanVShuman();

        void humanVSpc();

        void pcVSpc();

    public:
        Game(void);
        ~Game(void);

        void game(int gameType);


};

game.cpp:

#include "Game.h"


Game::Game(void)
{
    player1 = new NumSet;
    srand(time(0));
    player2 = new NumSet;
}


Game::~Game(void)
{
}

void Game::game(int gameType)
{
    if (gameType==1)
        humanVShuman();

    else if (gameType==2)
        humanVSpc();

    else if (gameType==3)
        pcVSpc();
}   

void Game::humanVShuman()
{
    system("cls");
    cout << *player1 << endl;
    //Sleep(200);
    cout << *player2 << endl;
    system("PAUSE");
}

void Game::humanVSpc()
{

}

void Game::pcVSpc()
{

}

And now for the interesting part:

In main.cpp. As long as I'm doing

#include "NumSet.h"
#include "Game.h"
#include <windows.h>

I'm getting a lot of errors in different h files such as wingdi.h and winuser.h.

If I'm not including my two h files NumSet and Game, and just including windows.h, it compiles with no errors.

If I'm including only my 2 h files, it compiles with errors.

So something in my 2 h files interrupts with windows.h. But what?

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by WhozCraig, user93353, duDE, Cody Gray, kapa Apr 24 '13 at 22:58

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
What kind of errors? –  Petr Budnik Apr 24 '13 at 0:02
8  
Well, since you said 130 errors rather than 132 or 127 it is clearly the fact that you need more fiber in your diet that is causing your troubles. –  Crazy Eddie Apr 24 '13 at 0:05
4  
Oh, geez, I just now noticed that you not only replaced windows.h but the entire include folder. Dude, VS is not broken. Your code is broken. Quit f-ing with VS. Uninstall the whole mess (and that won't be easy), reinstall it with default choices, leave it the heck alone, and figure out what's wrong with your code. –  Carey Gregory Apr 24 '13 at 0:08
4  
If you can restore it to the state it was in when you installed it then yes, do so. Then recompile. Post the file that includes windows.h and the first 10 error messages you get. –  Carey Gregory Apr 24 '13 at 0:11
4  
"Any ideas?" Yes. Quit replacing files without having any idea of what you're doing. :-) –  Ken White Apr 24 '13 at 0:47

2 Answers 2

SIZE is already defined in windef.h. You don't want to redefine it. Change it to MY_SIZE or something else in your NumSet.h. Then It compiles on my machine (vs2012 on Win7).

And also, you have some function names like max and min in your NumSet. Better avoid those. We already have that kind of macros defined in standard headers. Try some other names. Or it will give you some pains.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't including the OP's header file after windows.h also solve this problem? Granted that SIZE is redefined, but this happens after the windows.h stuff that gets included. –  Bhargav Bhat Apr 24 '13 at 3:09
    
@BhargavBhat No. According to my VS2012, include the header after windows.h will give you tons of errors :) –  gongzhitaao Apr 24 '13 at 3:48
    
Interesting, thanks for the input though. Isn't as straightforward as I thought it would be. –  Bhargav Bhat Apr 24 '13 at 3:50
    
@BhargavBhat That's because the OP define something like max and min in his class, which are already defined in standard headers :P Bad naming. –  gongzhitaao Apr 24 '13 at 3:51
2  
The fact that min and max are defined as macros in windows.h is terrible and causes lots of problems when trying to use 3rd-party code. For instance, see qt-project.org/forums/viewthread/22133. Fortunately, you can use NOMINMAX to prevent windows.h from defining them. –  Kyle Strand Apr 24 '13 at 4:14

First, I'd recommend making windows.h the first thing you include. That way, any errors you get will be seen as errors in your code rather than errors in windows.h, and that way you can fix them.

Second, try using #define NOMINNMAX before you include windows.h. This will prevent windows.h from generating the macros min and max (the names of which are frankly incredibly terrible, and MS should feel bad for choosing those names). That way, you can still use your functions min and max (or, as gongzhitaao suggested, you can rename them anyway).

(Gongzhitaao's suggestion of using something other than SIZE is probably also correct.)

EDIT: More information on NOMINMAX: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/143208

share|improve this answer
    
Note that some MS code does use the min and max macros, so this solution won't always work. I think that this is only true of MFC code, though I could be wrong. –  Kyle Strand Apr 24 '13 at 4:32
    
The gdiplus*.h headers use them. Best to just #undef them after the #include. –  Hans Passant Apr 26 '13 at 0:04

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