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I want to insert some fields and records into a file I created using a struct. I'm not sure if I asking the question in a right way but here is the code I wrote:

 struct Student
 {
    public string Name;
    public int Age;
    public int ID;
    public string Email;
    public string Country;
    public void ClearStudentInfo()
    {
        Name = "";
        Age = 0;
        ID = 0;
        Email = "";
        Country = "";
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        FileStream fsw = new FileStream("SomeFile.txt", FileMode.Append, FileAccess.Write);
        StreamWriter Sw = new StreamWriter(fsw);
        Sw.WriteLine("John", 22, 3254, "John123@yahoo.com", "United States");

        Sw.Close();
        fsw.Close();
    }
}

When I open the file SomeFile.txt, it shows John only and not the rest of records.

Is there anyway to insert it in much more organized way? To appear in tables or in the file like this:

Name: John
Age: 22
ID: 3254
E-mail: John123@yahoo.com
Country: United States

And if I will insert more than Student info, would this code be applicable to do so or not?!

Any answers would be appreciated.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
WriteLine("Name: " + student.Name); and do that for each record? or if you want to make something more generic, use reflection to print the name of the field and then its value and then. CSV format is also a very good alternative. –  Mr Universe Apr 24 '13 at 0:11
    
Is the purpose of this text file to be human-readable, machine-readable, or both? If machine-readable is one of the requirements, you should look into some existing serialization implementation, e.g. JSON or XML serialization. –  Tim S. Apr 24 '13 at 0:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
  1. Why are you using a Struct? Read these? I know you tagged struct but I don't see any reason to use it here.

  2. StreamWriter.WriteLine is not doing what you think it does. You were trying to use this which does not write out each item for you.

  3. As mentioned by Mr Universe you're better off with formatting your output in a conventional matter. However, see below for getting your output how you want. If you get randy and want dynamic output you could do a lookup table or reflection.

    class Student
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public int Age { get; set; }
        public int ID { get; set; }
        public string Email { get; set; }
        public string Country { get; set; }
    
        public void ClearStudentInfo()
        {
            Name = "";
            Age = 0;
            ID = 0;
            Email = "";
            Country = "";
        }
    
        public string FormatForOutput()
        {
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            sb.Append("Name: ");
            sb.Append(Name);
            sb.Append("\nAge: ");
            sb.Append(Age);
            sb.Append("\nID: ");
            sb.Append(ID);
            sb.Append("\nE-Mail: ");
            sb.Append(Email);
            sb.Append("\nCountry: ");
            sb.Append(Country);
            return sb.ToString();
        }
    }
    

    Used StringBuilder for efficiency of 4+ concatenations. Reference

Then you can do

    var student = new Student() { Name = "John", Age = 22, ID = 3254, Email = "John123@yahoo.com", Country = "United StateS" };
    using (FileStream fsw = new FileStream("SomeFile.txt", FileMode.Append, FileAccess.Write))
    {
        using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(fsw))
        {
            sw.WriteLine(student.FormatForOutput());
        }
    }

The "using" statement takes care of the close of the streams for you so you don't have to worry about it. See here though I hate that the example doesn't use a stream.

share|improve this answer
    
It's unclear whether the original poster's intention is for the type to represent a student, or a set of variables bound together with duct tape that might hold information about a student. The existence of a ClearStudentInfo method suggests the latter, in which case a struct or immutable class would seem a better fit than a mutable class. The ClearStudentInfo instance method should be replaced by either a static GetBlankStudent method that returns a struct, or a static Clear method which takes a struct-type ref param, but structs encapsulate values better than do mutable classes. –  supercat Apr 24 '13 at 15:33
    
@supercat If OP is unable to format data in this simple format he is better off using classes and getting some OOP knowledge, whether it is the best for his current case or not - he doesn't know. Or maybe he knows what he is doing just doesn't know C# enough in which case he can correctly ignore the change to a Class. –  bland Apr 24 '13 at 20:40
    
What will the effect of var myStudent = dataSource.GetStudent(whatever); myStudent.Age += 1; be on the student stored in dataSource? Knowing that the type is a struct with a public int field Age would suffice to define the behavior. How about if it's a mutable class? What would one have to know to determine what entities might be affected by writing to myStudent.Age? While using mutable class types as value holders may be more performant than using immutable class types, it poses many more pitfalls than either immutable class types or exposed-field structs. –  supercat Apr 24 '13 at 20:58

You are wildly confusing what the meaning of the parameters to WriteLine are. You have this line:

Sw.WriteLine("John", 22, 3254, "John123@yahoo.com", "United States");

It is unclear why you think this line will result in the output you seek, but this invocation passes the string "John" and passes as extra arguments (to string.Format(...)) the values 22, 3254, "John123@yahoo.com", and "United States" to that method. Since you do not use any string replacement tokens (such as {0}) your extra arguments are completely thrown away.

Therefore, it is no surprise that you are only printing out "John".

You say you want this output:

Name: John
Age: 22
ID: 3254
E-mail: John123@yahoo.com
Country: United States

But how could that be outputted when you never output the strings "Name:", "Age:", "ID:", etc.?

share|improve this answer

The most organised way to output the kind of information you wish is to use CSV.

WriteLine("Name,Age,ID,E-Mail,Contry");
WriteLine("John,22,3254,John123@yahoo.com,United States");
....

The it can be easily read by a program and viewed as a table using Excel or a similar spreadsheet software.

share|improve this answer

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