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I'm new to Ruby and I want to know how to define a constant whose scope is limited to a function.

def foo(number)
   # I want this to be a constant defined only inside foo
   ABC = 123 
   return number * 123
end
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2  
IIRC constants don't work like that. What's the purpose? –  Dave Newton Apr 24 '13 at 0:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's no way to do this. The code above will give a dynamic constant assignment error, because there's nothing to ensure that foo() is only called once. Ruby constants aren't really constant anyway; you can reassign them, and it'll just generate a warning and happily change the value.

Ruby is a dynamic language, duck-typed language; you generally should not rely on the parser/interpreter to guarantee things like constantness for you. There's no real benefit to scoping a constant, other than keeping your declaration near its use. You could just move it up to a higher scope. Another alternative that might make sense is to wrap your constants in a class/module to namespace them. It's not exactly the same as a local constant, but it may clarify the code; it's hard to tell from your small example.

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You can't do it and it really doesn't make any sense. Your script seems functional programming oriented, in the sense that you declare a constant inside a function (which is really a method of the main object).

Thinking in a more object oriented way you could define that constant in the Object class (which will be inherited by main) making it accessible everywhere after that class extension:

class Object
    ABC = 123
    def foo( number ); return number * ABC; end
end

Or even better, if that particular constant only make sense in a specific class or module:

module/class Bar
    ABC = 123
    def foo( number ); return number * ABC; end
end
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