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The following code converts an std::string to int and the problem lies with the fact that it cannot discern from a true integer or just a random string. Is there a systematic method for dealing with such a problem?

#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

int main()
{
    std::string str =  "H";

    int int_value;
    std::istringstream ss(str);
    ss >> int_value;

    std::cout<<int_value<<std::endl;

    return 0;
}

EDIT: This is the solution that I liked because it is very minimal and elegant! It doesn't work for negative numbers but I only needed positive ones anyways.

#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

int main()
{
    std::string str =  "2147483647";

    int int_value;
    std::istringstream ss(str);

    if (ss >> int_value)
        std::cout << "Hooray!" << std::endl;

    std::cout<<int_value<<std::endl;


    str =  "-2147483648";
    std::istringstream negative_ss(str);

    if (ss >> int_value)
        std::cout << "Hooray!" << std::endl;

    std::cout<<int_value<<std::endl;

    return 0;
}
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3  
if (ss >> int_value) might be a good start. –  WhozCraig Apr 24 '13 at 0:56
    
@WhozCraig not sure what you mean, can you please elaborate? –  lost_with_coding Apr 24 '13 at 0:56
1  
Try it. Replace your current bare ss >> int_value; with if (ss >> int_value) std::cout << "Hooray!" << std::endl; –  WhozCraig Apr 24 '13 at 0:58
    
Oh ok, you should at least answer the question then. –  lost_with_coding Apr 24 '13 at 1:00
1  
hmm, sounds familiar, you may want to see stackoverflow.com/questions/16156881/…, and my solution stackoverflow.com/questions/16156881/… –  Arun Apr 24 '13 at 1:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

WhozCraig's approach is much nicer and I wanted to expand on it using the approach that the C++ FAQ uses which is as follows:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <stdexcept>

class BadConversion : public std::runtime_error {
public:
  BadConversion(std::string const& s)
    : std::runtime_error(s)
    { }
};



inline int convertToInt(std::string const& s,
                              bool failIfLeftoverChars = true)
{
  std::istringstream i(s);
  int x;
  char c;
  if (!(i >> x) || (failIfLeftoverChars && i.get(c)))
    throw BadConversion("convertToInt(\"" + s + "\")");
  return x;
}


int main()
{
    std::cout << convertToInt( "100" ) << std::endl ;
    std::cout << convertToInt( "-100" ) << std::endl ;
    std::cout << convertToInt( "  -100" ) << std::endl ;
    std::cout << convertToInt( "  -100  ", false ) << std::endl ;

    // The next two will fail
    std::cout << convertToInt( "  -100  ", true ) << std::endl ;
    std::cout << convertToInt( "H" ) << std::endl ;
}

This is robust and will know if the conversion fails, you also can optionally choose to fail on left over characters.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for nice customized function –  taocp Apr 24 '13 at 1:14
    
I think I made something like this at one point, though a bit more general, and offered something specific that std::stoi and boost::lexical_cast did not. It was something like if (SafeInput::Input("Enter an integer: ", someInt, SafeInput::Options::NoLeftovers)) {...} :p –  chris Apr 24 '13 at 2:16

You may try to use Boost lexical_cast, it will throw an exception if the cast failed.

int number;
try
{
     number = boost::lexical_cast<int>(str);
}
catch(boost::bad_lexical_cast& e)
{
    std::cout << str << "isn't an integer number" << std::endl;
}

EDIT Accorinding to @chris, You may also try to use std::stoi since C++11. It will throw std::invalid_argument exception if no conversion could be performed. You may find more information here: std::stoi

share|improve this answer
    
Out of curiosity, how does this work on "-10" –  WhozCraig Apr 24 '13 at 1:02
    
thats nice of you tacp but WhozCraig answered it in a very simple way. thanks though. –  lost_with_coding Apr 24 '13 at 1:05
    
+1 for the boost answer. I like it! –  WhozCraig Apr 24 '13 at 1:06
1  
The concept is correct. The loop, to me, does not look like idiomatic C++ –  Arun Apr 24 '13 at 1:19
1  
By the way, there's a similar function for this purpose in the standard library, std::stoi, but it is slightly less strict, and throws two or three different exceptions. –  chris Apr 24 '13 at 2:11
/* isdigit example */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>
int main ()
{
  char str[]="1776ad";
  int year;
  if (isdigit(str[0]))
  {
    year = atoi (str);
    printf ("The year that followed %d was %d.\n",year,year+1);
  }
  return 0;
}
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