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I have a matrix which is made up of 4 columns (i.e. column 1, column 2, column 3 and column 4)

  V1 V2 V3 V4
1  1  1  1  1
2  1  1  1  1
3  1 -1 -1 -1
4  1 -1 -1 -1
5  2  1  1 -1
6  2  1  1 -1
7  2 -1 -1  1
8  2 -1 -1  1
9  3  1 -1  1
10 3  1 -1  1
11 3 -1  1 -1
12 3 -1  1 -1
13 4  1 -1 -1
14 4  1 -1 -1
15 4 -1  1  1
16 4 -1  1  1

My question is: I want to use this 4 columns to get a new matrix which has 15 columns. And these 15 columns are:

1, 2, 3, 4, 12, 13, 14, 23, 24, 34, 123, 124, 134, 234, 1234.

Here I use 12 to represent column 1 * column 2

So 1234 = column 1 * column 2 * column 3 * column 4.

Does anyone have some simple pieces of code to do this? Thanks for everyone's help.

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1  
You only have three columns of data there. The row labels are not a column. Did you leave data out? –  Glen_b Apr 24 '13 at 1:10
    
@Glen_b Thanks for reminding me. –  Stacy Apr 24 '13 at 1:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Although @Glen_b's answer is almost certainly preferable, here's another attempt:

# make some sample data
dat <- data.frame(V1=1:3,V2=2:4,V3=3:5,V4=5:7)

# get all the possible combinations
comps <- Reduce(c,sapply(2:4,function(x) combn(1:4,x,simplify=FALSE)))
#str(comps)
#List of 11
# $ : int [1:2] 1 2
# $ : int [1:2] 1 3
# $ : int [1:2] 1 4
# $ : int [1:2] 2 3
# $ : int [1:2] 2 4
# $ : int [1:2] 3 4
# $ : int [1:3] 1 2 3
# $ : int [1:3] 1 2 4
# $ : int [1:3] 1 3 4
# $ : int [1:3] 2 3 4
# $ : int [1:4] 1 2 3 4

# multiply out the combinations    
data.frame(dat,sapply(comps,function(x) Reduce("*",dat[x]) ))

#  V1 V2 V3 V4 X1 X2 X3 X4 X5 X6 X7 X8  X9 X10 X11
#1  1  2  3  5  2  3  5  6 10 15  6 10  15  30  30
#2  2  3  4  6  6  8 12 12 18 24 24 36  48  72 144
#3  3  4  5  7 12 15 21 20 28 35 60 84 105 140 420

As @mnel points out below in the comments, you can also pass a function to combn that will be applied to each combination, so this will work a treat in one step:

do.call(
        cbind,
          sapply(
          seq_along(dat),
          function(m) combn(m=m, x = dat, FUN = function(xx) Reduce('*',xx ))
                )
       )
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3  
You can pass a function to combn, as well as the data.frame, so do.call(cbind,sapply(seq_along(dat), function(m) combn(m=m, x = dat, FUN = function(xx) Reduce('*',xx )))) will get the job done. –  mnel Apr 24 '13 at 1:44
    
@mnel - impressive, it's functions all the way down. –  thelatemail Apr 24 '13 at 3:50

With the three columns you have, you can do this:

 model.matrix(~ V1*V2*V3, data=x)

or this:

 model.matrix(~ 0 + V1*V2*V3, data=x)

(Edit: there were originally three columns. The solution extends to 4 columns in the obvious way)

This idea easily extends to more columns.

But if you're trying to do this in order to fit a model, you're wasting your time - there's no need to calculate them directly.

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1  
Thanks for your helpful solution. Step by step, I have 4 subroutines, and this is the third one. I'm now considering your method to this, and just wonder if I can efficiently combine these 4 subroutines into a loop (or anything else) that I can have 220 distinct outputs without calculating them directly for 220 times. Is there efficient ways to do this? (A) Yes!→ Use the language with highly cooperated logic and get the desired results easily. :) (B) No! → Well, just face it! I have to do this job 220 times before i have all these done. A little bit tedious, but...still acceptable. (lol) –  Stacy Apr 24 '13 at 3:26
    
Its not sufficiently clear to me what you're trying to achieve there, but it's very likely you can do it in fairly concise ways. Perhaps you could post a new question to clarify the details of what you're trying to do. –  Glen_b Apr 24 '13 at 3:40

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