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After copping much abuse for the first time I asked this question I have calmed down and I am trying again and trying to be more specific.

I have done an assignment for Uni and this was the following prompt for one of the questions:

Write Create Table SQL statements for the relational schema that you have created
Place the text in the specified location in the file: ASS1_SQL.TXT
• All tables must have primary keys.
• All tables must have appropriate foreign key constraints.
• Each foreign key column must have identical column name, datatype and size of the primary key
that it refers to
• Add any NOT NULL constraints as dictated by the ERD
• The following columns data types and sizes must be used
suppid, stkid                 number(2)
suppname, stkname             varchar2(30)
sellprice, purchaseprice      number(6,2)

MY response to this was:

CREATE Table SUPPLIER(
suppid Number(2) NOT NULL,
suppname varchar2(30),
stkid Number(2) NOT NULL,
citycode Number(2) NOT NULL,
Primary Key (suppid),
Foreign Key (citycode) references CITY
)

CREATE Table STOCKITEM( 
stkid Number(2) NOT NULL, 
stkname varchar2(30) , 
sellprice Number(6,2) , 
purchaseprice Number(6,2) , 
suppid Number(2) , 
Primary Key (stkid) , 
whid Number(2) NOT NULL, 
suppid Number(2) Foreign Key references SUPPLIER , 
whid Number(4) Foreign Key references WAREHOUSE 
)

Before you say that I am pointing to tables that I haven't created (and mark my Question down), Please note that the WAREHOUSE and CITY tables have been created in the Database that I am using already.

This code works and creates the tables. However, I received 0 marks out of 10 with no explanation. The above code is slightly improved from initially as (I believe) I have fixed up the NOT NULL attributes.

Do my NOT NULL and FOREIGN KEY Constraints seem to have the right syntax?

The ERD can be found in a pdf at https://www.dropbox.com/sh/eohlj5h073kwp4u/Ot08kbdY7Q

Before voting this question down please consult me first and I can adjust it. I am new to this website so give me a chance please

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closed as off-topic by bluefeet, APC, Sean Vieira, Ramesh Rajendran, Ted Hopp Mar 2 at 16:33

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because it lacks sufficient information to diagnose the problem. Describe your problem in more detail or include a minimal example in the question itself." – APC, Sean Vieira, Ramesh Rajendran, Ted Hopp
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Why is this tagged for both MySQL and Oracle? Which database are you using? –  Gordon Linoff Apr 24 '13 at 1:45
    
The Number() types imply Oracle... Please remove the MySQL tag if that's correct... –  Michael Berkowski Apr 24 '13 at 1:45
    
Sorry, I meant SQL. Is that better? –  Danny Mahoney Apr 24 '13 at 1:48
1  
I know, I have actually spent quite some time researching this and I was told that this was where to go if you are really stuck on something and there is a lot writing on me getting my head around SQL in the next 5 days, My Bachelor's Degree to be precise. I can code JavaScript, PHP, HTML etc. but for some reason SQL throws me and people just act like dicks about it. Starting to doubt the usefulness of this site –  Danny Mahoney Apr 24 '13 at 1:54
1  
"0 marks out of 10 with no explanation" This is not a programming question. This is a "how to I speak to my tutor" question. –  APC Mar 2 at 15:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your foreign key syntax is incorrect.

Try this:

CONSTRAINT fk1 FOREIGN KEY (suppid)
    REFERENCES STOCKITEM(suppid)

Change your syntax to resemble the above.

Also, your primary key should be declared before any of your variables.

Lastly, the Primary key syntax in oracle looks like this:

CONSTRAINT pk PRIMARY KEY (suppid));

Complete Code:

CREATE Table SUPPLIER(
suppid Number(2) NOT NULL,
suppname varchar2(30),
stkid Number(2) NOT NULL,
citycode Number(2) NOT NULL,
CONSTRAINT pk1 PRIMARY KEY (suppid),
CONSTRAINT fk1 FOREIGN KEY (citycode) References ParentTable(primary_key_column)
)

CREATE Table STOCKITEM( 
stkid Number(2) NOT NULL, 
stkname varchar2(30) , 
sellprice Number(6,2) , 
purchaseprice Number(6,2) , 
suppid Number(2) , 
whid Number(2) NOT NULL, 
CONSTRAINT pk2 PRIMARY KEY (stkid),
CONSTRAINT fk2 FOREIGN KEY (suppid) References SUPPLIER(primary_key_column),
CONSTRAINT fk3 FOREIGN KEY (whid) References WAREHOUSE (primary_key_column)
)

Note:

You will, of course, need to change *primary_key_column* in the above example to your column name.

share|improve this answer
    
would they all be fk1 or would it be fk1, fk2... etc. ? –  Danny Mahoney Apr 24 '13 at 2:03
    
@DannyMahoney see my latest update. In short, you should make them unique names. –  What have you tried Apr 24 '13 at 2:04
    
    
Constraint names must be unique. In my opinion, they should also be somewhat meaningful, at least to the extent that they should include the table name. –  Dan Bracuk Apr 24 '13 at 2:08
    
Now that you marked this as the answer, I'm curious about your comment about your code running without error. –  Dan Bracuk Apr 24 '13 at 2:09

This is wrong:

Foreign Key (citycode) references CITY

because it doesn't reference a field in that table.

Also, these appear to be in the wrong order:

Primary Key (stkid) , 
whid Number(2) NOT NULL,

I always declare all my fields before my keys.

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