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I'm having a bit of trouble with a short assignment I'm working on in C. I have a 2 dimensional array that looks like this:

0 5 5 5
0 0 5 5
0 0 0 5
0 0 0 0

and I want to reflect the 5's across the diagonal so it looks like this:

0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0
5 5 0 0
5 5 5 0

This is what I have:

//reflect the 5's
for(i = 0; i < arraySize; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < arraySize; j++) {
        int temp = array[i][j];
        array[i][j] = array[j][i];
        array[j][i] = temp;
    }
}

It's not reflecting the 5's, when I print out the array after this happens, it looks the same as my initialized array. I feel like this is how I'm supposed to do it, but am I going about this wrong? Appreciate the help.

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1  
Well you are reflecting but then you are reflecting back when you iterate below the diagonal –  Shafik Yaghmour Apr 24 '13 at 1:52
    
I know the OP is a neophyte but he/she should really avoid the term: reflect. Perhaps "mirror". IIRC that was the term I heard when I was taking Linear algebra. –  Adam Gent Apr 24 '13 at 1:57
    
@AdamGent I think reflect is a proper term en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transpose –  Shafik Yaghmour Apr 24 '13 at 2:02
    
Damn it. I hate English and I hate math. Oh well. –  Adam Gent Apr 24 '13 at 2:50
    
In linear algebra this is called Transposition –  Matt McNabb Jul 7 '14 at 3:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have to stop half-way through your loop when swapping the values, otherwise you'll swap them right back to where you started!

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Well, I added an if condition in my nested for loops that fixed it. I didn't realize I was reflecting them right back where they were lol. Thanks a lot. –  mrowland Apr 24 '13 at 1:56

As I mentioned in my comment, since you are iterating over the whole matrix you are indeed reflecting but when you go below the diagonal you are then reflecting the 5s back into their original positions. The inner loop should start at i+1 and this will keep you above the diagonal:

for (j = i+1; j < arraySize; j++) {
         ^^^
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and thanks to you. –  mrowland Apr 24 '13 at 1:59

As a commenter points out, you're reflecting back when you iterate below the diagonal line, undoing the swap that you've just made.

Are your arrays always square? If so, this should work for you:

for(i = 0; i < arraySize; i++) {
    for (j = i+1; j < arraySize; j++) {

This works because i also tells us how far along the diagonal should start. We add +1, because we don't need to swap the middle values of the diagonal.

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Thank you as well. –  mrowland Apr 24 '13 at 1:59

Generally: swap(a[i][j], a[j][i]) for j=i+1..arrSize

//reflect the 5's
for(i = 0; i < arraySize; i++) {
    for (j = i+1; j < arraySize; j++) {
        int temp = array[i][j];
        array[i][j] = array[j][i];
        array[j][i] = temp;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I appreciate it. –  mrowland Apr 24 '13 at 1:58

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