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Have the following table structure

table structure

I need the count of transcriptions by statuses where the records do not have a workflow folder. This does the trick:

from p in Transcriptions
where p.WorkflowfolderID == null
group p by p.TranscriptionStatus.Description into grouped
select new 
{
   xp=grouped.Key,
   xp1= grouped.Count(),
}

Now I need to add the number of records where the Dueon date is in the past as in it is past the due by date.Something like

EntityFunctions.DiffHours(p.DueOn,DateTime.Today)>0

How do I include this in the resultset without firing 2 SQL queries? I am happy to get it as a third column with the same value in every row. Also is there anyway to get the percentage into the mix as in:

Status | Count | % |
------------------------------
Status1 | 20 | 20%
Status2 | 30 | 30%
Status3 | 30 | 30%
Overdue |20 | 20%

I have added Overdue as a row but perfectly happy to get it as a column with the same values.

Edited Content

Well this is the best I could come up with. Its not a single query but there is only one SQL trip. The result is:

Status | Count
----------------
Status1 | 20
Status2 | 30
Status3 | 30
Overdue |20

var q1= from p in Transcriptions
    where p.WorkflowfolderID == null
    group p by p.TranscriptionStatus.Description into grouped
    select new 
    {
       status= (string)grouped.Key,
       count= grouped.Count()
    };

    var q2 =(
      from p in Transcriptions select new {status = "Overdue", 
        count = (from x in Transcriptions 
        where x.DueOn.Value < DateTime.Now.AddHours(-24) 
        group x by x.TranscriptionID into 
        grouped select 1).Count() }).Distinct();
    q1.Union(q2)

It is a Union clause with the % calculation to be done once the results are returned. The weird thing is that I couldn't figure out any clean way to represent the following SQL in a LINQ statement which has resulted in the rather messy LINQ in the var q2.

SELECT COUNT(*) , 'test' FROM [Transcription]
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can add a condition to Count:

from p in Transcriptions
where p.WorkflowfolderID == null
group p by p.TranscriptionStatus.Description into grouped
select new 
{
    xp=grouped.Key,
    xp1= grouped.Count(),
    xp2= grouped
         .Count(p => EntityFunctions.DiffHours(p.DueOn, DateTime.Today) > 0)
}

By the way, with entity framework you can also use p.DueOn < DateTime.Today.

share|improve this answer
    
Count(predicate) is not supported by LINQ to Entities. –  MarcinJuraszek Apr 24 '13 at 8:09
    
@MarcinJuraszek. It is (maybe not pre 5.0?). –  Gert Arnold Apr 24 '13 at 8:21

@Gert Arnold

  from p in Transcriptions
        where p.WorkflowfolderID == null
        group p by p.TranscriptionStatus.Description into grouped
        select new 
        {

        status= (string)grouped.Key,
        count= grouped.Count(),
           overdue= grouped.Count(p => p.DueOn < EntityFunctions.AddHours(DateTime.Today, -24)),


        }

The above query does work as I wanted it to . It produces the outcome in the format

Status| Count | Overdue
----------------------
status1|2|0
status2|1|1

The only downside is the generated SQL is running 2 queries BOTH with inner joins . My original idea with the Union may be a better idea performance wise but you answered my query and for that I am grateful.

Can this query be represented in some other cleaner manner than my above attempt -

SELECT COUNT(*) , 'test' FROM [Transcription]
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, you're welcome. However, you are in the answers section here. I think what you write here is not an answer, you better add it to your original post by editing it. You may want to mark my answer as accepted if it helped you. You better post your last question as a new StackOverflow question. –  Gert Arnold Apr 24 '13 at 14:07
    
By the way, I don't understand what yo mean by "2 queries BOTH with inner joins". I think you mean 2 subqueries in 1 larger query. The database engine's query compiler should be able to optimize that. –  Gert Arnold Apr 24 '13 at 14:08
    
I meant that the resulting query and subquery both have inner joins.Anyways have marked your answer as accepted. Thanks –  shai Apr 25 '13 at 1:50

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