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I have a SQL database that is being queried and needs to be sorted by a calculation based off of user input, then sorted by said calculation, then printed out.

Weird, I know.

So, with the help of the oracle known as Google, I came up with the following code:

$result = mysql_query($query) or die(mysql_error());
$buffer = array();
while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)){
$vars;
$calc1 = [[equation]];
$calc2 = [[equation]];
$calc3 = [[equation]];
$calc4 = [[equation]];

$row['calc1'] = $calc1;
$row['calc2'] = $calc2;
$row['calc3'] = $calc3;
$row['calc4'] = $calc4;

$buffer[] = $row;
}

print "<table border='1px' cellpadding='4px' cellspacing='0'><tr><th>TABLE HEADERS</th></tr>";
foreach($buffer as $row){
    print "<tr><td>";
print $row['rows....'];

print "</tr>";

}
unset($buffer, $row);
print "</table>";
mysql_close();

Obviously a lot more complex, but the code is proprietary at the moment. I will have hundreds of entries, and the calculation is as follows:

round((((($b1 / $b2) * ($bcMix * $pVm)) + (($c1 / $c2) * ((1 - ($bcMix * .01)) * $pVm)) * 12) * 5) + $pP, 2);

I also want to sort the result by two criteria: the calculation itself as well as a numerical database entry - both low to high. usort is causing my site to crash (for whatever reason):

usort($buffer, function($a, $b){
 return $a['tcoy1'] < $b['tcoy1']; 
});

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
3  
array_push expects an array to push to, and what to push. Also, are you sure you can't sort it purely in SQL? –  bfavaretto Apr 24 '13 at 3:26
    
The sorted criteria is based on user input - so it would need to be calculated first, then sorted. Can SQL do good calculations? $row is an array, whenever I do var_dump($row) it prints array(.... –  Christopher Apr 24 '13 at 3:28
    
@Christopher: Show us the calculations. Yes, MySQL can do calculations. Depending on how complex they are and how many records you have, it may or may not be better to do them in SQL vs PHP. –  Mark Apr 24 '13 at 3:55
    
@Mark I hav edited my question for clarification. –  Christopher Apr 24 '13 at 4:47

3 Answers 3

Try fetch to buffer:

$result = mysql_query($query) or die(mysql_error());

$buffer = array();

while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)){
    $vars;

    $calc1 = [[equation]];
    $calc2 = [[equation]];
    $calc3 = [[equation]];
    $calc4 = [[equation]];

    $row['calc1'] = $calc1;
    $row['calc2'] = $calc2;
    $row['calc3'] = $calc3;
    $row['calc4'] = $calc4;

    $buffer[] = $row;
}

// sort $buffer by 'calc1' DESC:
usort($buffer, function($a, $b){ return $a['calc1'] < $b['calc1']; });

print "<table border='1px' cellpadding='4px' cellspacing='0'><tr><th>TABLE HEADERS</th></tr>";

foreach($buffer as $row){
    print "<tr><td>";
    print $row['rows....'];
    print "</td></tr>";
}

unset($buffer, $row);

print "</table>";
mysql_close();

You have inappropirate use of array_push(). Check the manual. Still, I don't think it even needed there.

P.S.: php_mysql extension is deprecated. I suggest to use php_mysqli or php_pdo instead.

share|improve this answer
    
The sorting would be lowest to highest on Calc1 then by a database entry Var1. –  Christopher Apr 24 '13 at 3:33
    
I don't know why, but that usort statement is crashing my site... –  Christopher Apr 24 '13 at 4:37
    
@Christopher , strange... Try it might because of anonimous function. Try apply callback old fashion way. –  HAL9000 Apr 24 '13 at 5:03
    
-- Nevermind -- It worked, now it isn't displaying any results. –  Christopher Apr 24 '13 at 14:23

Use array_multisort() or usort() with a custom comparison function.

share|improve this answer

If you're doing any complex calculations you're better off doing them in PHP and here's why:

  1. There is support for most of the math types in PHP, in MySQL not as many.
  2. In PHP you can handle a failed equation with a response, if you're doing them on a database server you have to pull the error, analyse and determine what happened.
  3. Databases are designed for storing data and PHP is a programming language for running programs (and equations).
  4. You can store the equations in a secure database table and then run them via PHP at will.

Anything with MySQL in the name is for the database only. You're doing a few extra things. I'm assuming that because you're pulling a query(although you don't show the query) that you're storing the equations in the database.

When you use mysqli_fetch_array() you're pulling the result from the database into an array already, so no need to call it twice. Anything pulled in a while() statement is going to live for the life of the while unless it's loaded into an existing var or array.

Storing the queries in the database is the tricky bit because you can store a $ character with single quotes and have it be a literal character you can use later for evaluation.

<?php
//If the vars are set then we're ready for processing
if(!empty($_POST['var1'])&&!empty($_POST['var2'])){

$query = 'select * from equations';
$result = mysqli_query($query) or die(mysqli_error());

//Create the array for storing the equations
$equations = array();
while($row = mysqli_fetch_array($result)){
    $id = $row['id'];
    $equation = $row['id'];
    //store the equations into the array
    $equations[$id]=$equation;
}

//Do some sort of check here... I'm expecting a number
if(is_numeric($_POST['var1'])){
    $var1 = $_POST['var1'];
} else {
//set a default (not 0) 
    $var1 = 1;  
}

//Do some sort of check here... I'm expecting another number
if(is_numeric($_POST['var2'])){
    $var2 = $_POST['var2'];
} else {
//set a default (not 0) 
    $var2 = 1;  
}

//Cool little function for doing equations with 2 vars being passed.
function doEquation($eq,$var1,$var2){
//eg. $eq = '$var1+$var2';
    eval("\$answer=\"$eq\";");
    return $answer;
}

$code = "<!doctype html>\n<html>\n<body>\n";
$code .= "<table style='padding:4px;border:none;'><tr><th>Table Header</th></tr>";

foreach($equations as $id=>$eq){
    $answer = doEquation($eq,$var1,$var2);      
    $code .= "<tr><td>Answer $id = $answer</td></tr>\n";    

}

$code .= "</table>";
$code .= "</body></html>";
} else {
//No vars set we can show them the form for the calculations.

$code = "<!doctype html>\n<html>\n<body>\n";
$code .= "<form method='post'>";
$code .= "Enter Var1<br>";
$code .= "<input type='number' name='var1' value='1' />";
$code .= "Enter Var2<br>";
$code .= "<input type='number' name='var2' value='1' />";
$code .= "<input type='submit' name='submit' value='Calculate' />";
$code .= "</form>"; 
$code .= "</body></html>";
}

print $code;

?>

You'll want to be careful with some of the calculations. You have to type and check all of the incoming variables. For instance you can't divide by 0 because it will throw an error. Also it is possible to load a very complicated equation with enough info to crash a server. Remember anything coming into the server that will be parsed needs to be filtered and checked against what you're expecting. You don't want to use echo commands and have someone start throwing $_SERVER vars to the screen.

Also because in my example we're using eval() you want to make sure this can't perform any additional equations or functions submitted by the user. So strip_tags() and so forth as necessary. Since my example was expecting a number, I'm checking to see if it is_numeric.

share|improve this answer
    
You might have misunderstood... I don't want to put the calculations into the database, I just want to do a calculation based off of user input AND database entries, then use the result to sort the results and also print them out. Hard to show with proprietary code... –  Christopher Apr 24 '13 at 4:25
    
I made 8 proprietary calculators a few weeks ago for calculating welding times on industrial pipes. It was much easier to do them in PHP. –  AbsoluteƵERØ Apr 24 '13 at 4:35
    
Most of the other calculators I make are statistical user tracking apps and usually they can be written in MySQL, although it's roughly the same speed using PHP or MySQL in that regard. –  AbsoluteƵERØ Apr 24 '13 at 4:42
    
Is there a real difference between each method? Both are executed on the server, so it won't effect end user performance either way. –  Christopher Apr 24 '13 at 4:48
1  
@Mark base64_encode would make it so the equations weren't easily text-readable by anyone who glanced at the database (a non-programmer). You could double encode them for that matter. Anyone who has access to the code and the database can see everything because it's all spelled out. He's using die(mysql_error()); Let's hope that's only on the dev server. If he's using it on a production box then bots would be all over it if he's using an open source browser or OpenDNS to get to a remote server. –  AbsoluteƵERØ Apr 24 '13 at 5:07

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